Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
Media presentation Anna McCarthy
Media presentation Anna McCarthy
Media presentation Anna McCarthy
Media presentation Anna McCarthy
Media presentation Anna McCarthy
Media presentation Anna McCarthy
Media presentation Anna McCarthy
Media presentation Anna McCarthy
Media presentation Anna McCarthy
Media presentation Anna McCarthy
Media presentation Anna McCarthy
Media presentation Anna McCarthy
Media presentation Anna McCarthy
Media presentation Anna McCarthy
Media presentation Anna McCarthy
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Media presentation Anna McCarthy

110

Published on

Published in: Business
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
110
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
1
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Gender Communication in Media
  • 2. In our society today, media surrounds us everywhere that we go. There are several different forms of media that display similar messages. “Media provides myths, or recurrent story structures, through which human beings understand who they are and where they fit in a social order.” (DeFrancisco & Palczewski, 237)
  • 3. Television Revolu,on  By the late 1980’s more than 80% of all U.S.   homes had at least one television.   “The ubiquity of mediated images  from television, movies and music  videos are perhaps the most powerful  Familiarizing influences shaping   Our contemporary society.”  (DeFrancisco & Palczewski, 237)  Television is among the most popular leisure   ac,vi,es in the United States, making it a key media outlet.  
  • 4. Media as a Social Ins,tu,on  “Media share conven,ons regarding  construc,on of content and   construc,on of audience.”  (DeFrancisco & Palczewski, 237)  Media work together to capture  our focus and aWen,on on several   different outlets portraying   similar messages.   “How can television signals, movie projectors, or radio waves be an  ins,tu,on?” (DeFrancisco & Palczewski, 237)  
  • 5. Media Economics  Economic processes and ins,tu,onal paWerns govern media messages.   “Ads that sell commodi,es… to audiences  are part of a system in which media  corpora,ons sell audiences as  commodi,es to adver,sers.”   (DeFrancisco & Palczewski, (238)  Much media is cra_ed to appeal   to a specific market.  
  • 6. Media and Power  Media forms influence social norms  about gender and other factors   that cons,tute iden,ty.   “Ins,tu,ons are organized in  accord with and permeated  by power.”   (DeFrancisco & Palczewski, 238)  “Simultaneously, a commodity, an art form, and an important ideological  forum for public discourse about social issues and social change.”  (DeFrancisco & Palczewski, 239) 
  • 7. Media and Hegemony  Although it is becoming more common to see  masculine females or feminine males on television,   They o_en s,ll meet feminine or masculine standards  of aWrac,veness.   “Media, as an ins,tu,on of civil society,   shape the cogni,ve structures through  which people perceive and evaluate  social iden,ty.”   (DeFrancisco & Palczewski, 239) 
  • 8. Above the Influence  Like many other strong influences, it is possible to rise above the influence of  media. The authors suggest three ways:  1) “Examine how powerful or effec,ve opposi,onal responses are, compared to  the power of hegemonic messages.”  2) “Try to discern the roles media play in   facilita,ng opposi,onal readings.”  3) “Explore what we, as textbook authors,   and you, as students, can do to facilitate   cri,cal abili,es.”   (DeFrancisco & Palczewski, 240) 
  • 9. Media Polyvalence and Opposi,onal  Readings  There can be many different interpreta,ons  made about media texts. The interpreta,on  depends on each person and their   previous experiences.   “Polyvalence occurs when audience  members share understandings  of the denota,ons of a text but  disagree when the valua,on  of these denota,ons to such a degree  that they produce notably different  Interpreta,ons.” (DeFrancisco & Palczewski, 240) 
  • 10. Interlocking Ins,tu,ons  “Of all the ins,tu,ons that   intersect, media may be the  most interconnected.”  (DeFrancisco & Palczewski, 240)  Media are, “resources which   individuals use to think through  their sense of self and modes of  expression.”   (DeFrancisco & Palczewski, 240)  Media is a puzzle of informa,on with each outlet being its own piece.  
  • 11. It’s Not About Sex Difference  Differences Among Women:  • Pictures that depict unobtainable expecta,ons are inescapable.   • The degree to which images are interpreted depends on several demographics.   Similari3es Between Men and Women:  • Both are influenced by body image aspira,ons.   • Both sexes have body norms that have changed with ,me.   “Even though images may be understood as unobtainable and hence are less  powerful, they s,ll influence self‐percep,on.”   (DeFrancisco & Palczewski, 242) 
  • 12. Media Content and Media Effects  The main goal of analysis of media content is  to quan,fy what is in mediated products. Some   examples of this are the amount of women versus  men that is visible in television programming, or   the amount of violence in children’s programming.   ”Iden,fica,on of various problema,c media representa,ons is one way to   start the conversa,on about the role of media in contemporary society.”  (DeFrancisco & Palczewski, 244) 
  • 13. Violence in Media  There have been several studies to   inves,gate the effects of violence in  media.   “More than 1,000 studies have  Established a rela,onship between  Television violence and aggressive   behavior in children.”   (DeFrancisco & Palczewski, 244)  “Women’s and minori,es’ absence in media, and presenta,ons of women as  sex objects, may create the percep,on that they are not agents of ac,on,  capable of commen,ng on and ac,ng in the world.”   (DeFrancisco & Palczewski, 244) 
  • 14. The Gaze(s)  The second most prominent area of media research focuses   on media construc,ons of audience.   “Men act and women  Appear. Men look at   women. Women watch  themselves being looked at… Thus she turns herself into an   object.” (DeFrancisco & Palczewski, 249)  “The presumed sex of the viewer is male, and even when the   viewer is female, she views herself through men’s eyes.”  (DeFrancisco & Palczewski, 249) 
  • 15. Media as Always Liberatory and  Constraining  The guidelines of gender are con,nuously resecured by media  representa,ons in response to these changes different media, such as  magazines, reflect these changes and constraint by viewing how they have  changed their content over ,me.   “With every movement toward libera,on, constraints are reinscribed, and  with every image that appears restric,ve, an opposi,onal reading is possible.”  (DeFrancisco & Palczewski, 254)  It is important to remember that gender in communica,on  is not just about,   “women and femininity, but also about men and masculinity, women and   masculini,es, and men and feminini,es.” (DeFrancisco & Palczewski, 245) 

×