• Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Be the first to comment
    Be the first to like this
No Downloads

Views

Total Views
156
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0

Actions

Shares
Downloads
6
Comments
0
Likes
0

Embeds 0

No embeds

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
    No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Psychoeducational Assessment of Children (Boehm, Unit II)
    • Definition of assessment :
    • observing , evaluating , gathering , and recording information about a child in order to make decisions about his or her education.
  • 2. Assessment: Why?
    • Class : Why will you as teachers need to assess children?
    • What types of problems or challenges will make you think “This child needs to be evaluated or assessed?”
  • 3. Assessment: Why?
    • 1. intelligence : mentally retarded (Downs syndrome), gifted, borderline IQ
  • 4. Intelligence: The Bell Curve
    • Above 130 = gifted
    • 115-130 = superior
    • 85-115 = average
    • 70-85 = borderline or
    • slow learner
    • Below 70 mentally
    • retarded
  • 5. Assessment: Why?
    • 2. language ability, communication skills
    • 3. achievement level
  • 6. Assessment: Why?
    • 4. social interactions :
    • Feels isolated
    • Is a bully
    • Is a victim
    • Difficulty relating appropriately to others
    • Too aggressive
    • Too shy, timid
  • 7. Assessment: Why?
    • Social interactions (cont.) :
    • Loneliness, isolation,
    • Low self-esteem
  • 8. Assessment (Boehm, Unit II)
    • Teachers are the primary assessors of children – not tests!
  • 9. 2 Types of Assessment: Formal & Informal
    • 1. Formal:
    • Standardized tests :
    • A. Intelligence (IQ Test: Stanford Binet) administered to identify : mental retardation, learning disabilities, giftedness, placement, & part of a clinical evaluation)
    • B. Academic Achievement test to identify what child has learned in a certain grade
  • 10. Formal Assessments : tests
    • C. Readiness for next grade
    • D. Screening for a diagnosis: ex., learning Dx,
    • Personality tests
    • Aptitude tests: to identify child’s strengths, talents, weak area
  • 11. Formal testing
  • 12. Testing Guidelines (NAEYC: ages 3-8)
    • 1. A test should not be used to determine school entry or readiness
    • 2. A test cannot be the only criterion for retaining a child in kindergarten or placing him or her in special education programs
  • 13. Testing Guidelines
    • 3. If testing is to be done, children must be tested in their native language.
  • 14. Informal Assessment
    • 2. Informal assessment :
    • done by teachers; used much more than formal methods.
    • Based on observations, checklists, rating scales, parent interviews
  • 15. Additional Informal Assessments
    • 10 Alternatives to Standardized tests :
    • 1. Developmental checklists :
    • art, language, math, scientific thinking, music, physical development, social studies
  • 16. 2. Work Samples
  • 17. Work samples
  • 18. 3. Displays of Children’s Work Projects
  • 19. Informal Assessments
    • 4. Interviews
    • 5. Conferences with parents
  • 20.  
  • 21. Informal Assessments
    • 6. Performances:
    • anecdotal records
  • 22. Informal Assessments
    • 7. Audio, video tapes or photos
    • 8. Portfolios of children’s work
    • 9. Anecdotal records
    • 10. Summary reports
  • 23.  
  • 24.  
  • 25. TEACHERS: Being Alert to Indicators of psychosocial & mental health problems:
    • Most teachers know which students probably are headed for trouble.
    • Teachers do better in identifying high-risk children of any age when they have a systematic way of describing kids’ behavior and know just what to look for.
  • 26. Being Alert to Indicators of psychosocial & mental health problems:
    • If a student of yours is of significant concern, a request should be made to an appropriate person on the school staff who can do some further screening/ assessment.
  • 27. Being Alert to Indicators of psychosocial & mental health problems:
    • 1. What is “problem” behavior?
    • A child’ actions are considered to be a problem when they adversely affect the child, another child, or the environment.
  • 28. Being Alert to Indicators of psychosocial & mental health problems:
    • Signs that indicate a referral is necessary:
    • 2. Behaviors that :
    • a. Are too extreme
    • b. Happen too often
    • c. Persist too long
    • d. The number of symptoms is
    • excessive
  • 29. 3 categories of childhood disorders:
    • 1. Internalizing Dx : depression, anxiety, eating disorders
    • 2. Disruptive behavioral Dx : ADHD, oppositional Dx, conduct Dx, substance use
    • 3. Developmental Dx : mental retardation, pervasive developmental Dx, learning Dx
  • 30. 1. Internalizing Disorders:
    • Anxiety, depression, sadness, eating Dx
  • 31. Anxiety, worry and children
  • 32. Depression, anxiety in children
  • 33. Anger, Anxiety, & Depression
  • 34. 2. Disruptive behavioral Disorders
    • ADHD=
    • Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder
    • Inattentive, can’t concentrate
    • Impulsive
    • Hyperactive, restless, on-the-go
  • 35. Mental Health Assessment
    • 2. D isruptive behavioral Dx: oppositional- defiant, conduct Dx, substance use
  • 36. Mental Health Assessment
    • 2. D isruptive behavioral Dx: oppositional defiant, conduct Dx, substance use
  • 37. Mental Health Assessment
    • 2. D isruptive behavioral Dx: oppositional defiant, conduct Dx, substance use
  • 38. Mental Health Assessment
  • 39. Mental Health Assessment
    • Conduct Disorder that develops in childhood can become an Antisocial disorder (psychopath) after age 18
  • 40. 3. Developmentally delayed disorders
    • Autism, Asperger’s:
    • A. severe impairment in social interaction; failure to develop peer relationships at appropriate developmental level
  • 41. Mental Health Assessment
    • Autism, Asperger’s (cont.):
    • B. Restricted, repetitive behaviors, interests, activities
  • 42. Mental Health Assessment
    • C. In autism, impairment in language, verbal & nonverbal
  • 43. Mental Health Assessment
    • D. L earning disabilities : example, dyslexia
  • 44. Mental Health Assessment
    • O ther at-risk children: sexual/physical/
    • emotional abuse, neglect, domestic violence, child custody in divorce proceedings
  • 45. Examples of mental health assessments with children from my private practice
  • 46. THE END
  • 47. Assessment: Formal
    • Testing means presenting a child with a set of questions or tasks in order to obtain a measure of performance often represented by a score. The score is intended to help answer questions and produce information about the child tested.
  • 48. Assessment: Why?
    • Mental retardation: Down’s syndrome in children & newborn
  • 49. Performances
  • 50.