• Share
  • Email
  • Embed
  • Like
  • Save
  • Private Content
Ethical decision making-technology and privacy in the workplace
 

Ethical decision making-technology and privacy in the workplace

on

  • 3,047 views

 

Statistics

Views

Total Views
3,047
Views on SlideShare
3,047
Embed Views
0

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
28
Comments
0

0 Embeds 0

No embeds

Accessibility

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

    Ethical decision making-technology and privacy in the workplace Ethical decision making-technology and privacy in the workplace Presentation Transcript

    • Ethical Decision Making: Technology and Privacy in the Workplace
      Prepared by:
      ANNALYN G. PEÑA
    • Psychological testing at Dayton Hudson
      Answer each of the following questions True or False:
      I feel sure there is only one true religion.
      My soul sometimes leaves my body.
      I believe in the second coming of Christ.
      I wish I were not bothered by thoughts about sex.
      I am very strongly attracted by members of my own sex.
      I have never indulged in any unusual sex practices
    • Definitions of Privacy
      Right to be “let alone”-the right to make decisions for oneself
      Much too broad to be recognized as a moral right
      Right to control information about oneself
      Clearest case of an invasion of privacy occurs when others come to know personal information about us
      Informational sense of privacy involves relationship between two parties
    • Importance of Privacy
      Privacy establishes the boundary between individuals and thereby defines one’s individuality
      The right to control certain extremely personal decisions and information helps determine the kind of person we are and the person we become
    • Ethical sources of Privacy
      Universal right to Autonomy-everyindividual has a right to make decisions about his/her personal existence without restriction
      Reciprocal obligation–for an individual to expect respect for his/her autonomy, that individual has a reciprocal obligation to respect the autonomy of others
    • Ethical sources of Privacy (Con’t)
      Hypernorms and moral free space (Donaldson & Dunfee)
      Examples of hypernorms-freedom of speech, right to personal freedom, right to physical movement and informed consent
      Property Rights- Involves determination of who controls the tangibles and intangibles
      Property-is an individual’s life and all nonprocreative derivatives of her/his life
      Derivatives-includes thoughts and ideas, and personal info (intangibles)
    • Linking Privacy to Ethical Implications of Technology
      Technological challenge to privacy:
      Technology makes our jobs easier but allows employers to ask more of each employee
      New technology provides new ways to gather information on which to base our value judgment
      Firms often experience unanticipated challenges stemming from new technology
    • Linking Privacy to Ethical Implications of Technology (Con’t)
      INFORMATION AND PRIVACY
      Consumer Privacy- focused on gathering and use of information in database marketing
      Facilitated by computer technology
      Issues on consumer privacy- access to information and potential misuse
      Benefits outweigh the challenges
    • EMPLOYEE PRIVACY AND MONITORING
      Employee Privacy
      Psychological testing-not 100% accurate
      Employee Privacy is violated whenever:
      Employers infringe upon personal decisions that are irrelevant to the employment contract
      Whenever personal information that is irrelevant to that contract is collected, stored, or used without the informed consent of the employee
    • EMPLOYEE PRIVACY AND MONITORING (Con’t)
      Workplace Monitoring-new technologies enable employers to watch more closely than ever before.
      Subjects for monitoring: Internet monitoring, e-mail monitoring and videotaping
      Companies are forced to increase monitoring of employees (for more complex and dangerous manufacturing process)
    • EMPLOYEE PRIVACY AND MONITORING (Con’t)
      Employee Monitoring through drug testing
      Wellness programs and medical benefits-results in the collection of medical data
      The issue: Employers “threaten” employees to dissuade them from pressing a suit
    • Risks involved in a failure to understand the implication of technology and its use
      When we don’t completely understand the technology, we are not able to effectively protect our own information
      Knowledge gap exists between people whodo understand and others who do not understand
    • Additional Ethical Challenges
      Information is now freely available from a variety of sources
      Continuous accessibility blurs the lines between our personal and professional lives
      “Facelessness results from the use of the new technology accessible in the workplace
      We become more careless with our communications
    • REASONS WHY EMPLOYERS MONITOR EMPLOYEES’ WORK
      Employers need to manage their workplace
      Monitoring allows the manager to ensure effective, productive performance
      Monitoring helps protect employer’s other resources
    • BUSINESS REASONS TO LIMIT MONITORING
      Monitoring may create a suspicious and hostile workplace.
      Monitoring may constrain effective performance
      Employees claim that monitoring is an inherent invasion of privacy
    • Balancing Interests
      Consider whether monitoring could be made ethical or humane
      Hawthorne Effect
      Strive towards a balance that respects individual dignity while also holding individuals accountable for their particular roles in the organization
    • Elements of a Monitoring Program
      No monitoring in public areas (e.g. restrooms)
      Monitoring limited to within the workplace
      Employees should have access to information gathered through monitoring
      No secret monitoring – advance notice required
    • Elements of a Monitoring Program (Con’t)
      Monitoring should only result in attaining some business interest
      Employer may only collect job-related information
      Agreement regarding disclosure of information gained through monitoring
      Prohibition of discrimination by employers based on off-work activities
    • OTHER FORMS OF MONITORING
      Polygraph testing (lie-detector), physical and electronic surveillance, third party background checks, and psychological testing
      Electronic monitoring and surveillance—more recent
      Genetic testing and screening—provide new questions about privacy—another technology that will offer businesses a wealth of information about potential employee and customers
    • Conclusion:
      Without question, the technologies that threaten privacy have brought us many benefits. Finding the right means is a great challenge to business firms which must meet many business ethics problems, protecting privacy requires a coordinated solution involving many parties. Until a solution is found, though, the focus of businesses will remain on developing and implementing privacy policies.
    • Computer Privacy
    • The End!