Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
Networks and Organisational Work
Networks and Organisational Work
Networks and Organisational Work
Networks and Organisational Work
Networks and Organisational Work
Networks and Organisational Work
Networks and Organisational Work
Networks and Organisational Work
Networks and Organisational Work
Networks and Organisational Work
Networks and Organisational Work
Networks and Organisational Work
Networks and Organisational Work
Networks and Organisational Work
Networks and Organisational Work
Networks and Organisational Work
Networks and Organisational Work
Networks and Organisational Work
Networks and Organisational Work
Networks and Organisational Work
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Networks and Organisational Work

1,357

Published on

Presentation for Knowledge and Networks course

Presentation for Knowledge and Networks course

Published in: Technology, Education
0 Comments
2 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
1,357
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
2
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. How do ‘networks’ enable/inhibit organisational work?
      • PS428 Online Group Discussion
      • Presentation
      • Neil Poduke, Sarah Otner, Vinti Mehtal, Grace Hong, Toru Jhaveri, Eduardo Pereira-Filho, Anna Maron
  • 2. Outline
      • 1. Introduction
      • 2. Social Network Analysis
      • 3. Co-opetition
      • 4. Actor Network Theory
      • 5. Our Own Experience
  • 3. Social Network Analysis
      • Networks are the aggregation of links between any collectivity of agents (people, in the case of organizations; organizations in the case of large-scale collaborations, etc)
  • 4. Social Network Analysis
      • From a organisational development perspective we
      • ask 3 questions:
      • (i) where do we want to go?
      • (ii) what is going on (where are we)?
      • (iii) how do we get there?
  • 5. Social Network Analysis
      • ... Then studying and understanding social networks can tell us...
      • (i) what kind of informal network structures would we like to see operating
      • (ii) what are the current networks? Intra-organisation? Inter-organisation?;
      • (iii) how do we work with the existing networks?
  • 6. Social Network Analysis
      • Social networks can...
      • improve information flow and knowledge-reuse;
      • identify bottlenecked information (who hoards, etc)
      • drive planned and emergent innovation;
      • nurture value-creating interactions;
      • influence knowledge creation and dissemination
      • enable organisational change
  • 7. Social Network Analysis
      • 6 types of networks
      • work networks,
      • social networks,
      • innovation networks,
      • expert knowledge networks,
      • career networks,
      • learning networks,
      • (virtual networks)
  • 8. Social Network Analysis
  • 9. Social Network Analysis
      • Mapping these will generate a typology...
      • of primary nodes...
      • -Hubs
      • -Gatekeepers
      • -Pulse takers
  • 10. Social Network Analysis
      • Types of Connections:
      • Clusters/cliques
      • Weak ties
      • Small world networks
      • Preferential attachment
  • 11. Co-opetition
      • Collaboration and competition
      • Can be internal and external
      • Carries synergistic benefits
      • Enhances knowledge sharing
      • Enables organisational work
      • Can potentially harmful
  • 12. Actor Network Theory
      • The production of knowledge relies on networks of relationships.
      • Network is understood as a result of power translation.
      • Translation is a process in which a few obtain the legitimate right to represent many silent actors.
      • However, this process is always contested and demands continuous negotiation.
  • 13. Actor Network Theory
      • Assumption of ‘generalised symmetry’:
      • No privilege of a point of view and no censorship of any interpretation;
      • No distinction between social and technical aspects of the problem;
      • No distinction between human and non human (all are actants ).
  • 14. Actor Network Theory
      • Four moments of translations are described:
      • Problematisation
      • Interessement
      • Enrolment
      • Mobilisation
  • 15. Actor Network Theory
  • 16. Actor Network Theory
      • Two aspects of relevance:
      • Stable networks are stable for some.
      • We are simultaneously multiple members and marginalised
  • 17. Actor Network Theory
      • Allegoric example:
      • Allergy to onions = minor disability
      • Restaurants (disbelief of the chief X picking little slivers or close examining the plate)
      • McDonald’s (long time to prepare an special sandwich X scrap off onions with a plastic knife)
      • = individual cost of surveillance OR institutionalised process
      • = economic significance (vegetarian) OR social/political concern (handicap)
  • 18. Actor Network Theory
      • Differences on stabilisation:
      • Within a network
      • Between networks
      • For whom network is stable
      • For whom network is not stable
      • = ongoing negotiation of identity
  • 19. Problems & Challenges
      • 1. Without identifying a project manager or coordinator type of person in the group, it is difficult to facilitate the online discussions effectively given the voluntary nature of the formation of the group.
      • 2. Group members have different angles and sub-topics of interests regarding knowledge and networks, but the attention of the possible interaction and debates of these ideas did not happen because:
      • a) People are learning to use the tool, Google Group
      • b) Other coursework priorities
  • 20. Implications
      • 1. Formal interventions of the group process contribute to knowledge integration and task execution
      • 2. The limitation of the ICT as an effective tool in collaboration and the group process
      • 3. Questions we take away from the online discussion
      • a) How useful is the autonomous flexibility of the online tool in knowledge integration
      • b) The task itself is a group-learning component of the PS428 course. What is the nature of collective learning?

×