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Mack topics

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Transcript

  • 1. Finding and Developing a Topic for an Original Oratory
  • 2. Introduction• Who am I?• What are we talking about today?• Remember to ask questions as we go along if you have them
  • 3. What is an Oratory topic?• Topics for original oratories most often identify societal problems• Topics are conceptual not specific problems• Topics must be something you have a personal connection/commitment to• Topics must have the qualities of a good topic
  • 4. What is an Oratory topic?• Topics for original oratories most often identify societal problems• Topics are conceptual not specific problems• Topics must be something you have a personal connection/commitment to• Topics must have the qualities of a good topic
  • 5. Examples of Past Topics • Ugly Duckling Syndrome • Friendship is a shell of what it used to be • We’ve lost imagination • We don’t know how to forgive • We’ve stopped playing • We need to learn to be better leaders by being better followers • We are not grateful
  • 6. What is an Oratory topic?• Topics for original oratories most often identify societal problems• Topics are conceptual not specific problems• Topics must be something you have a personal connection/commitment to• Topics must have the qualities of a good topic
  • 7. Specific VS Conceptual Problems
  • 8. What is an Oratory topic?• Topics for original oratories most often identify societal problems• Topics are conceptual not specific problems• Topics must be something you have a personal connection/commitment to• Topics must have the qualities of a good topic
  • 9. Finding a Personal Connection Start with an example, fact, or idea that you feel passionate about• Look to your own life and to real world examples• Look to recent studies, books, or articles
  • 10. 10 Things• Compile a list of 10 things you would change about the world• Each item must be accompanied by an example, fact, or story• Identify top 5 items that you have strongest connection to• Cross off any ideas that are cliché or trite, or overly complicated
  • 11. 10 Things• Identify top 5 items that you have strongest connection to• Cross off any ideas that are cliché or trite, or overly complicated• Consider your audience and cross off any topics that might be too controversial, too difficult, or inappropriate for the situation• You should have 1 or 2 good ideas left
  • 12. What is an Oratory topic?• Topics for original oratories most often identify societal problems• Topics are conceptual not specific problems• Topics must be something you have a personal connection/commitment to• Topics must have the qualities of a good topic
  • 13. Qualities of a Good Topic • Validity • Relevance • Depth • Digestibility
  • 14. Choosing a Topic• Once you have 1-2 good topic ideas you should begin developing them• Write a purpose statement • Finish the sentence “I want to persuade people to…”• Brainstorm problems, causes, effects, and solutions• Choose the topic that meets the quality standards and that you are most connected to
  • 15. Naming Your Topic • Naming is the process of finding the correct way to frame or “name” your topic so that it is the most clear, interesting, and significant • Spin • Flip it! • Wrap it! • Put it in context!
  • 16. Writing a Thesis • Your thesis statement is what will drive your entire speech • It must be clear and have depth • It must identify the problem you are addressing and what that problem does.EXAMPLE: “We have become our own biggest critics– ruthless down to the nitty gritty details, which is oftenincredibly paralyzing.”
  • 17. Next Steps • Research • Chose organizational pattern • Write outline • Write draft • Edit • Memorize • Practice • Perform