SOCIAL MARKETING
SOCIAL MARKETING IS THE PRACTICE OF
UTILIZING THE PHILOSOPHY, TOOLS, AND
PRACTICES OF COMMERCIAL MARKETING
FOR HEALTH AND/...
SOCIAL MARKETING BASICS
 Must be client/consumer/audience centered-so
need to know them in order to target
 Same as comm...
NGOs are typically value-based
organizations which depend, in whole or in
part, on donations and voluntary services
 Term...
UNIQUE CHARACTERS OF NGOS
 NGOs and NPOs have a formal
organizational structure.
 NOGs and NPOs are non-government
entit...
 they work for the public good, supporting the
interests of the general public
There are different NGOs which cover a defined territory or the
state. They, thus, also cover a defined area of working su...
TYPES OF NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS
The different types of non-profit organization include:
i. Private educational instituti...
An NGO may play more than one role in
society, with reference to advocacy,
grassroots implementation or opinion-
making, e...
TYPES OF NGOs: EXAMPLES – GLOBAL AND INDIAN (Contd..)
Types Examples Focus Areas
Corporate NGOs Bill and Melinda Gates
Fou...
TYPES OF NGOS: EXAMPLES – GLOBAL AND INDIAN
Types Examples Focus Areas
Advocacy of
chosen cause
Geenpeace Environment
Narm...
TYPES OF NGOs: EXAMPLES – GLOBAL AND INDIAN (Contd..)
Types Examples Focus Areas
Corporate NGOs Bill and Melinda Gates
Fou...
TABLE: ADVOCACY METHODS FOR NGOS
Networking One of the great strengths of NGOs lies in their
strong networking skills. It ...
CATEGORIES OF NON-PROFIT
ORGANISTIONS
Non-profit organizations can be
basically classified into two
groups viz.,
(i) priva...
DIFFERENCE BETWEEN PROFIT AND NON-
PROFIT / PRIVATE ORGANIZATION
Profit Organization Non-profit / Private Organization
Own...
SIGNIFICANT DIFFERENCE BETWEEN
BUSINESS AND PUBLIC (GOVERNMENT)
ORGANISATIONS
Business Public Non-Profit
Organisation
Main...
What are the
fundamental
differences between
managing an NGO and
a company
What are the
challenges in both,
and how do you
overcome them?
8 P’S OF SOCIAL MARKETING
 Product
 Price
 Place
 Promotion
 Public
 Partnership
 Policy
 Purse Strings
Can corporate
principles be
replicated at an NGO?
STEPS FOR DESIGNING A SOCIAL MARKETING
CAMPAIGN
 Step 1- Need assessment of consumers
 Step 2- Consumer Research
 Step ...
PRODUCT
 The social marketing "product" is not necessarily a
physical offering. A continuum of products exists,
ranging f...
PRICE
 "Price" refers to what the consumer must do in
order to obtain the social marketing product.
This cost may be mone...
PLACE
 "Place" describes the way that the product reaches the consumer.
For a tangible product, this refers to the distri...
PROMOTION
 Finally, the last "P" is promotion. Because of
its visibility, this element is often mistakenly
thought of as ...
PUBLIC
 Social marketers often have many different
audiences that their program has to address
in order to be successful....
PARTNERSHIP
 Social and health issues are often so
complex that one agency can't make a dent
by itself. You need to team ...
POLICY
 Social marketing programs can do well in
motivating individual behavior change, but
that is difficult to sustain ...
PURSE STRINGS
 Most organizations that develop social
marketing programs operate through funds
provided by sources such a...
SOME MAJOR NGOs
Self Employed women’s Association (SEWA), Ahmedabad, Gujarat.
Society for Participatory Research in Asia (...
Their primary purpose is to defend or
promote a specific cause. As opposed to
operational project management, these
organi...
The Mother NGO scheme was introduced
by the Department of Family Welfare in the
Ninth Five Year Plan (1997-2002) under
the...
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Social Marketing Is The Practice Of Utilizing The

  1. 1. SOCIAL MARKETING
  2. 2. SOCIAL MARKETING IS THE PRACTICE OF UTILIZING THE PHILOSOPHY, TOOLS, AND PRACTICES OF COMMERCIAL MARKETING FOR HEALTH AND/OR SOCIAL PROGRAMS
  3. 3. SOCIAL MARKETING BASICS  Must be client/consumer/audience centered-so need to know them in order to target  Same as commercial marketing except goal is not revenue/profit  Focus on enhancing perceived benefits & reducing perceived barriers. Actions will only occur if perceived benefits > perceived costs  Manage the P’s  Measure results
  4. 4. NGOs are typically value-based organizations which depend, in whole or in part, on donations and voluntary services  Terminology  NGOs are also known by following alternate names/terms:  NPO: Not-For-Profit Organization  CSO: Civil society Organization
  5. 5. UNIQUE CHARACTERS OF NGOS  NGOs and NPOs have a formal organizational structure.  NOGs and NPOs are non-government entities,  NGOs and NPOs are categorized as non- profit distributing entities  NGOs and NPOs are self-governed, and must have the capability to manage themselves internally
  6. 6.  they work for the public good, supporting the interests of the general public
  7. 7. There are different NGOs which cover a defined territory or the state. They, thus, also cover a defined area of working such as: • Advocate/Campaigning • Life Skills development • Promotion of Economic alternatives • HIV/ADIS/ Health Awareness • Community Outreach • Legal Aid/Crisis Intervention • Community Mobilization and Collectivization • Integrated Water Resource Management • Child Labour abolition • Rural Transformation through Self Help and Empowerment and Micro finance.
  8. 8. TYPES OF NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS The different types of non-profit organization include: i. Private educational institutions like private universities, college, and schools. ii. Charities. iii. Social service organizations iv. Health service organizations like Sri Venkateshwara institute of Medical Sciences. v. Foundations vi. Cultural organizations vii. Religious organizations like Tirumala-Tirupati Devasthanams andShirdi Dai Samsthanams. viii. Social organizations
  9. 9. An NGO may play more than one role in society, with reference to advocacy, grassroots implementation or opinion- making, etc. Following are the types of NGOs based on their roles and areas of working: 1.Advocacy for a cause 2.Grassroot implementation 3.Mother NGOs 4.Corporate NGOs 5.Opinion-makers 6.Global
  10. 10. TYPES OF NGOs: EXAMPLES – GLOBAL AND INDIAN (Contd..) Types Examples Focus Areas Corporate NGOs Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation Promotes greater equity in global health, education, public libraries, and support at risk families Infosys Foundation Works in the areas of healtchcare, education, social rehabilitation and the arts. Azim Premiji Foundation Capacity building, universalization of elementary Education, sustainable partnerships with individuals, community at large, government and other organizations Byrraju Foundation Rural transformation Opinion Makers Greenpeace Environment Blue Corss Animal Protection Global UNICEF Works for children’s rights, their survival, development and protection Red cross Disaster services, health and safety services Source: Compiled from different source.
  11. 11. TYPES OF NGOS: EXAMPLES – GLOBAL AND INDIAN Types Examples Focus Areas Advocacy of chosen cause Geenpeace Environment Narmada Bachao Andolan Rehabitation of displaced people due to Sardar Sarovar Dam Chipko Environment and deforestation Asha Kiran Domestic servants THPI Rehabilitation of challenged people Grassroot MV Foundation Child labour MS Swaminathan Research Foundation Livelihood generation THPI Education CapNet Water resource management SWEA Women SHGs Mother NGOs Bihar Voluntary Health Association, bihar Health Social Action for social Development, Hyderabad Social Arena Center for Labour Education and social research, Bilaspur Education Indian Association of Women, and Chief Relief, Lucknow Women and Children
  12. 12. TYPES OF NGOs: EXAMPLES – GLOBAL AND INDIAN (Contd..) Types Examples Focus Areas Corporate NGOs Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation Promotes greater equity in global health, education, public libraries, and support at risk families Infosys Foundation Works in the areas of healtchcare, education, social rehabilitation and the arts. Azim Premiji Foundation Capacity building, universalization of elementary Education, sustainable partnerships with individuals, community at large, government and other organizations Byrraju Foundation Rural transformation Opinion Makers Greenpeace Environment Blue Corss Animal Protection Global UNICEF Works for children’s rights, their survival, development and protection Red cross Disaster services, health and safety services Source: Compiled from different source.
  13. 13. TABLE: ADVOCACY METHODS FOR NGOS Networking One of the great strengths of NGOs lies in their strong networking skills. It enables those without much money to share their voices and exert strength in numbers. Conferences Conferences have been a powerful advocacy method for NGOs, enabling groups to share their voices, make contacts and influence public policy. Protests Protests now accompany most world political and economic forums. Over the past few years, protesters have targeted almost every forum or summit calling attention to the undemocratic decision-making and pressing for change and global justice. Source: http://www.globalpolicy.org/ngos/role/index2.htm
  14. 14. CATEGORIES OF NON-PROFIT ORGANISTIONS Non-profit organizations can be basically classified into two groups viz., (i) private non-profit organizations, (ii) public non-profit organizations.
  15. 15. DIFFERENCE BETWEEN PROFIT AND NON- PROFIT / PRIVATE ORGANIZATION Profit Organization Non-profit / Private Organization Ownership Private Private Funding Sales revenue Membership fee, contributions from public and / or private sources, sale of products or services Types Single proprietorship, partnership, corporation Floated by members Activities Production and / or Marketing of goods and or services Educational, charitable, social service, Health service, foundation, cultural, religious, and recreational Main objective Profit maximization Service maximization
  16. 16. SIGNIFICANT DIFFERENCE BETWEEN BUSINESS AND PUBLIC (GOVERNMENT) ORGANISATIONS Business Public Non-Profit Organisation Main Objective Profit Public service Economic Objectives Profit required bankruptcy possible No profit required bankruptcy unlikely Structure Frequently decentralized into profit centers Usually a centralized bureaucracy Accountable to Shareholders Representative of the people Control of Strategy Management Representatives of the people Scope of Activity Unlimited, no monopoly Limited, State monopoly Major Sources of Funds Shareholder, banks, financial companies Government Taxation
  17. 17. What are the fundamental differences between managing an NGO and a company
  18. 18. What are the challenges in both, and how do you overcome them?
  19. 19. 8 P’S OF SOCIAL MARKETING  Product  Price  Place  Promotion  Public  Partnership  Policy  Purse Strings
  20. 20. Can corporate principles be replicated at an NGO?
  21. 21. STEPS FOR DESIGNING A SOCIAL MARKETING CAMPAIGN  Step 1- Need assessment of consumers  Step 2- Consumer Research  Step 3-Audience Segmentation  Step 4- Social Marketing Mix  Step 5- Develop and Pre-test ur material  Step6-Implementation  Step 7-Evaluation  Step 8-Feedback
  22. 22. PRODUCT  The social marketing "product" is not necessarily a physical offering. A continuum of products exists, ranging from tangible, physical products (e.g., condoms), to services (e.g., medical exams), practices (e.g., breastfeeding, ORT or eating a heart- healthy diet) and finally, more intangible ideas (e.g., environmental protection). In order to have a viable product, people must first perceive that they have a genuine problem, and that the product offering is a good solution for that problem. The role of research here is to discover the consumers' perceptions of the problem and the product, and to determine how important they feel it is to take action against the problem.
  23. 23. PRICE  "Price" refers to what the consumer must do in order to obtain the social marketing product. This cost may be monetary, or it may instead require the consumer to give up intangibles, such as time or effort, or to risk embarrassment and disapproval. If the costs outweigh the benefits for an individual, the perceived value of the offering will be low and it will be unlikely to be adopted. However, if the benefits are perceived as greater than their costs, chances of trial and adoption of the product is much greater.
  24. 24. PLACE  "Place" describes the way that the product reaches the consumer. For a tangible product, this refers to the distribution system-- including the warehouse, trucks, sales force, retail outlets where it is sold, or places where it is given out for free. For an intangible product, place is less clear-cut, but refers to decisions about the channels through which consumers are reached with information or training. This may include doctors' offices, shopping malls, mass media vehicles or in-home demonstrations. Another element of place is deciding how to ensure accessibility of the offering and quality of the service delivery. By determining the activities and habits of the target audience, as well as their experience and satisfaction with the existing delivery system, researchers can pinpoint the most ideal means of distribution for the offering
  25. 25. PROMOTION  Finally, the last "P" is promotion. Because of its visibility, this element is often mistakenly thought of as comprising the whole of social marketing. However, as can be seen by the previous discussion, it is only one piece. Promotion consists of the integrated use of advertising, public relations, promotions, media advocacy, personal selling and entertainment vehicles
  26. 26. PUBLIC  Social marketers often have many different audiences that their program has to address in order to be successful. "Publics" refers to both the external and internal groups involved in the program. External publics include the target audience, secondary audiences, policymakers, and gatekeepers, while the internal publics are those who are involved in some way with either approval or implementation of the program.
  27. 27. PARTNERSHIP  Social and health issues are often so complex that one agency can't make a dent by itself. You need to team up with other organizations in the community to really be effective. You need to figure out which organizations have similar goals to yours-- not necessarily the same goals--and identify ways you can work together.
  28. 28. POLICY  Social marketing programs can do well in motivating individual behavior change, but that is difficult to sustain unless the environment they're in supports that change for the long run. Often, policy change is needed, and media advocacy programs can be an effective complement to a social marketing program.
  29. 29. PURSE STRINGS  Most organizations that develop social marketing programs operate through funds provided by sources such as foundations, governmental grants or donations. This adds another dimension to the strategy development-namely, where will you get the money to create your program?
  30. 30. SOME MAJOR NGOs Self Employed women’s Association (SEWA), Ahmedabad, Gujarat. Society for Participatory Research in Asia (PRIA), New Delhi. Church’s auxiliary for social Action (CASA), New Delhi SAHELI, New Delhi. NIRANTAR, New Delhi Voluntary Action Network, India (VANI, New Delhi ANKUR, New Delhi People’s rural Education Movement (PREM), Mandiapally, Orissa LOK SHAKTI, Balasore, Orissa UNNATI, Ahmedabad, Gujarat Society for Promotion of Area Resource Centre (SPARC), Bombay PREPARE, Madras ASMITA (Resource Centre for Women), Hyderabad Child In Need Institute (CINI), Calcutta
  31. 31. Their primary purpose is to defend or promote a specific cause. As opposed to operational project management, these organizations typically try to raise awareness, acceptance and knowledge by lobbying, press work and activist events.
  32. 32. The Mother NGO scheme was introduced by the Department of Family Welfare in the Ninth Five Year Plan (1997-2002) under the Reproductive and Child Health Program. Under this scheme, the Department of FW identified and sanctioned grants to selected NGOs called Mother NGOs (MNGOs) in allocated district/s. These MNGOs, in turn, issued grants to smaller NGOs, called Field NGOs (FNGOs), in the allocated district/s. The grants were to be used for promoting the goals/objective as outlined in the Reproductive and Child Health Programme of the union government. The major thrust of the MNGOs and FNGOs is in the area of advocacy and awareness generation in respect of the RCH programme, with due emphasis on gender, while aiming to augment institutional capacity at the field levels. They also play a crucial role in addressing the gaps in information and counseling.
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