Lectin-functionalized carboxymethylatedkappa-carrageenan microparticles fororal insulin delivery                ANKIT GILA...
CONTENTS•   INTRODUCTION•   ARTICLE INFO.•   MATERIALS AND METHODS•   RESULTS AND DISCUSSION•   CONCLUSION•   FUTURE PROSP...
INTRODUCTION• The current administration of peptide-based  drugs, such as insulin, is predominately via the  parenteral ro...
• The recent introduction  of an inhaled delivery  system for insulin was  short-lived and resulted  in the withdrawal of ...
• Therefore, the oral delivery of insulin still  remains an attractive alternative delivery  route.• But there are two mai...
Techniques to manufacture                microcapsules(1) Physical methods          * Pan coating          * Air-suspensio...
Ionotropic gelation technique• Ionotropic gelation is based on the ability of  polyelectrolytes to cross link in the prese...
• The hydrogel beads are produced by dropping  a drug-loaded polymeric solution into the  aqueous solution of polyvalent c...
Polyelectrolyte biopolymers    employed in hydrogel preparation•   Alginates•   Gellan Gum•   Chitosan•   Carboxymethyl Ce...
MATERIALS AND METHODS
MATERIALS•   kappa-Carrageenan•   Human recombinant insulin•   lectin from Triticum vulgaris (WGA)•   200 mM L-glutamine, ...
MATERIALS (cont..)• Chromolith Performance RP-18e HPLC  columns (4.6 m × 100 mm)• Syringes (1 mL) and needles with diamete...
Synthesis and characterization ofcarboxymethylated kappa-carrageenan5 g of powdered kappa-carrageenan was suspended in 100...
The product was recovered through vacuum filtration and washed   alternately with 50 mL of ethanol–water (4:1) and 50 mL o...
Preparation of insulin-loaded microparticles125–175 mg powdered carboxymethylated kappacarrageenan wasdissolved in 1 mL of...
The insulin-loaded microparticles were thencollected by decantation    dried in a desiccator overnight at 4◦C.
Preparation of insulin-loaded lectin   surface-conjugated microparticles   microparticles were first surface activated wit...
Determination of insulin encapsulationefficiency and insulin load• an indirect method to measure the insulin  content in t...
Determination of insulin encapsulationefficiency and insulin load
Determination of the degree of surfacelectin conjugation• performed in parallel to determine the insulin  encapsulation ef...
Microparticle size and surfacecharacteristics determination• The diameters of freshly prepared (wet) and  dried microparti...
In vitro insulin release kineticssimulated gastric fluid (SGF) (pH 1.2) with stirring (100   rpm) at 37 ◦C for 2 h.  After...
In vitro insulin release kinetics• Insulin profiles from the encapsulated microparticles  were fitted to the power law equ...
In vivo studyInduction of diabetes                         i.p. administration of                                         ...
In vivo studyThe microparticles were pre-packed in hard gelatincapsules (size 9, Qualicaps®capsule) and administeredorally...
In vivo studyGROUP                                 DOSE                       ROUTETEST               (1) LECTIN         2...
• Blood was collected from the tail vein immediately  before treatment and 0.5, 1, 1.5, 2, 4,6, 8, 12, 24 and  36 h after ...
RESULTS AND DISCUSSION• Preparation of insulin-loaded microparticlesEncapsulation efficiency of insulin using various poly...
The effect of pH on the encapsulation efficiency of insulin bythe addition of 0.3 M sodium acetate buffer into the insulin...
Above pH 5.4, insulin is negativelycharged. Encapsulation improvementoccurs (97.7±2.2%) when insulin hasa net positive cha...
Encapsulation efficiency of insulin with increasing amountsof drug (10–35 mg).
(E) Percentage of insulin release in simulated intestinal fluid (SIF) (pH7.4) after crosslinking with polyglutaraldehyde (...
In vitro studiesDissolution profile of non-functionalized and lectin-functionalizedcarboxymethylated kappa-carrageenan mic...
In vitro insulin release kinetics• parameter n was calculated by fitting the release  data into the power law, the average...
• For a spherical system, when   (1) n ≤ 0.43, the release mechanism is diffusion-controlled  (CaseI),   (2) n ≥ 0.85, the...
In vivo studies
CONCLUSION• This study clearly shows that insulin entrapped in  lectin functionalized carboxymethylated kappa-  carrageena...
• The covalently bound, negatively charged sulfate  groups in carboxymethylated kappa-carrageenan  interact with the amino...
FUTURE PROSPECTS• lectin-functionalized oral formulation might serve as a  promising alternative or as a complementary the...
REFERENCES1. Andrews, G. P., Laverty, T. P., & Jones, D. S. (2009). Mucoadhesive polymeric platforms for   controlled drug...
Lectin-functionalized carboxymethylated kappa-carrageenan microparticles for oral insulin delivery
Lectin-functionalized carboxymethylated kappa-carrageenan microparticles for oral insulin delivery
Lectin-functionalized carboxymethylated kappa-carrageenan microparticles for oral insulin delivery
Lectin-functionalized carboxymethylated kappa-carrageenan microparticles for oral insulin delivery
Lectin-functionalized carboxymethylated kappa-carrageenan microparticles for oral insulin delivery
Lectin-functionalized carboxymethylated kappa-carrageenan microparticles for oral insulin delivery
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Lectin-functionalized carboxymethylated kappa-carrageenan microparticles for oral insulin delivery

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Lectin-functionalized carboxymethylated kappa-carrageenan microparticles for oral insulin delivery

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Lectin-functionalized carboxymethylated kappa-carrageenan microparticles for oral insulin delivery

  1. 1. Lectin-functionalized carboxymethylatedkappa-carrageenan microparticles fororal insulin delivery ANKIT GILANI [NIPERA1113PC03] DEPT. OF PHARMACOLOGY & TOXICOLOGY NIPER AHMEDABAD
  2. 2. CONTENTS• INTRODUCTION• ARTICLE INFO.• MATERIALS AND METHODS• RESULTS AND DISCUSSION• CONCLUSION• FUTURE PROSPECTS• REFERENCES
  3. 3. INTRODUCTION• The current administration of peptide-based drugs, such as insulin, is predominately via the parenteral route, which has a number of disadvantages.
  4. 4. • The recent introduction of an inhaled delivery system for insulin was short-lived and resulted in the withdrawal of the product from the market by pharmaceutical companies.
  5. 5. • Therefore, the oral delivery of insulin still remains an attractive alternative delivery route.• But there are two main hurdles : 1) enzymatic degradation and 2) their inability to transverse the biological barriers of the gastrointestinal tract.
  6. 6. Techniques to manufacture microcapsules(1) Physical methods * Pan coating * Air-suspension coating * Centrifugal extrusion * Vibrational Nozzle * Spray–drying(2) Physico-chemical methods * Ionotropic gelation * Coacervation(3) Chemical methods * Interfacial polycondensation * Interfacial cross-linking * In-situ polymerization * Matrix polymerization
  7. 7. Ionotropic gelation technique• Ionotropic gelation is based on the ability of polyelectrolytes to cross link in the presence of counter ions to form hydrogels.• The natural polyelectrolytes inspite, having a property of coating on the drug core and acts as release rate retardants contains certain anions on their chemical structure.• These anions forms meshwork structure by combining with the polyvalent cations and induce gelation by binding mainly to the anion blocks.
  8. 8. • The hydrogel beads are produced by dropping a drug-loaded polymeric solution into the aqueous solution of polyvalent cations.• The cations diffuse into the drug-loaded polymeric drops, forming a three dimensional lattice of ionically crossed linked moiety.• Biomolecules can also be loaded into these hydrogel beads under mild conditions to retain their three dimensional structure.
  9. 9. Polyelectrolyte biopolymers employed in hydrogel preparation• Alginates• Gellan Gum• Chitosan• Carboxymethyl Cellulose• Kappa-carrageenan
  10. 10. MATERIALS AND METHODS
  11. 11. MATERIALS• kappa-Carrageenan• Human recombinant insulin• lectin from Triticum vulgaris (WGA)• 200 mM L-glutamine, fetal bovine serum (FBS), 0.25% trypsin-EDTA• phosphate-buffered saline (pH 7.4) tablets• Potassium chloride, sodium hydroxide, potassium dihydrogen orthophosphate.• 37% fuming hydrochloric acid and acetonitrile• Glutaraldehyde 25% (v/v), orthophosphoric acid, sodium acetate salt
  12. 12. MATERIALS (cont..)• Chromolith Performance RP-18e HPLC columns (4.6 m × 100 mm)• Syringes (1 mL) and needles with diameters of 25G, 26G and 27G
  13. 13. Synthesis and characterization ofcarboxymethylated kappa-carrageenan5 g of powdered kappa-carrageenan was suspended in 100 mL of 2- propanol and stirred for 30 min at room temperature. Next, 5 mL of 16 N sodium hydroxide was added at a rate of 1 mL per 15 min with continuous stirring at room temperature. Monochloroacetic acid (5.3 g) was then added portionwise to the reaction mixture over a period of 20 min.The reaction mixture was heated to 50 ◦C with continuous stirring for 4 h to drive the reaction process to completion.
  14. 14. The product was recovered through vacuum filtration and washed alternately with 50 mL of ethanol–water (4:1) and 50 mL ofethanol three times. The modified carrageenan was oven dried at 70 ◦C overnight and powdered in a glass mortar. The degree of carboxymethylation on the modified kappa- carrageenan was determined using NMR Molecular weight was measured using size-exclusion liquid chromatography Sulfate content was determined using ion chromatography.
  15. 15. Preparation of insulin-loaded microparticles125–175 mg powdered carboxymethylated kappacarrageenan wasdissolved in 1 mL of pH-adjusted (pH 4.0–7.0) deionized water with0.3 M sodium acetate buffer (pH 4.0).1 mL of human insulin (10–30 mg/mL) was addedand mixed thoroughly to form a viscous dispersion.The resulting dispersion was then loaded into a 1 mL syringe andextruded dropwise through needles of varying sizes (internaldiameter, 0.4–0.5 mm) into 20 mL of 1.5 M potassium chloride–HClsolution (pH 1.2) with constant stirring (50 rpm) under a constantstream of air blown perpendicular to the tip of the needle.
  16. 16. The insulin-loaded microparticles were thencollected by decantation dried in a desiccator overnight at 4◦C.
  17. 17. Preparation of insulin-loaded lectin surface-conjugated microparticles microparticles were first surface activated withpolyglutaraldehyde, followed by conjugation to lectin rinsed four successive times with 5 mL of 1.5 M immersed in asoaked in 10 mL of potassium lectin solution Washed and thenpolyglutaraldehyde chloride–HCl (0.25–1.25 dried in a solution solution (pH 1.2) to mg/mL PBS, desiccator(0.1–5.0%, v/v) for remove excess pH 7.4) for overnight at 4 ◦C. 1 h. crosslinking reagent, followed 30 min. by washing with deionized water.
  18. 18. Determination of insulin encapsulationefficiency and insulin load• an indirect method to measure the insulin content in the 1.5 M potassium chloride–HCl solution (hardening solution) using an established HPLC protocol was performed• the AUC values were used to construct the standard curve for the estimation of insulin content in the hardening solution.
  19. 19. Determination of insulin encapsulationefficiency and insulin load
  20. 20. Determination of the degree of surfacelectin conjugation• performed in parallel to determine the insulin encapsulation efficiency and insulin load.
  21. 21. Microparticle size and surfacecharacteristics determination• The diameters of freshly prepared (wet) and dried microparticles were estimated using a microscope (CX31, Olympus Optical Co., Ltd., Tokyo, Japan).• The size and surface characteristics were assessed using a field emission scanning electron microscope (Quanta 200 FESEM, FEI, Oregon, USA) in a low-vacuum mode with 50×, 2000×, 8000× and 50000× magnifications.
  22. 22. In vitro insulin release kineticssimulated gastric fluid (SGF) (pH 1.2) with stirring (100 rpm) at 37 ◦C for 2 h. After 2 h, the SGF was carefully removed, replaced and incubatedwith 20 mL of SIF (pH 7.4)with stirring at 37 ◦C for 8 h.
  23. 23. In vitro insulin release kinetics• Insulin profiles from the encapsulated microparticles were fitted to the power law equation to calculate n and determine the insulin release kinetics: Where, Mt is the amount of insulin released up to a specified time, t; M∞ is the final amount of insulin released; k is the structural/geometric constant for a particular system; t is the sampling time and n represents the release exponent of the release mechanism.
  24. 24. In vivo studyInduction of diabetes i.p. administration of After two weeks, rats male Sprague– 45 mg/kg of with fasting blood Dawley rats. streptozocin in 0.1 M glucose levels above sodium citrate buffer 300 mg/dL (pH 4.0).
  25. 25. In vivo studyThe microparticles were pre-packed in hard gelatincapsules (size 9, Qualicaps®capsule) and administeredorally at 25, 50 and 100 IUinsulin/kg usinga bulb-tipped gavage needle
  26. 26. In vivo studyGROUP DOSE ROUTETEST (1) LECTIN 25, 50 and 100 IU ORAL FUNCTIONALIZED insulin/kg MICROPARTICLES (2) NON-LECTIN 50 and 100 IU insulin/kg ORAL FUNCTIONALIZED MICROPARTICLESPOSITIVE CONTROL INSULIN SOLUTION 2 IU insulin/kg SC INSULIN SOLUTION 100 IU/kg ORALNEGATIVE CONTROL UNTREATED EMPTY CAPSULES ORAL
  27. 27. • Blood was collected from the tail vein immediately before treatment and 0.5, 1, 1.5, 2, 4,6, 8, 12, 24 and 36 h after administration. Blood glucose levels were measured using an Accu-Check Active blood glucose meter. The post-treatment blood glucose levels were expressed as the percent of pre-treatment blood glucose.• quantitative serum insulin determination
  28. 28. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION• Preparation of insulin-loaded microparticlesEncapsulation efficiency of insulin using various polymer weights(125–175 mg) and needle sizes (0.4–0.5 mm).
  29. 29. The effect of pH on the encapsulation efficiency of insulin bythe addition of 0.3 M sodium acetate buffer into the insulin–polymer mixture.
  30. 30. Above pH 5.4, insulin is negativelycharged. Encapsulation improvementoccurs (97.7±2.2%) when insulin hasa net positive charge of less than 1 At a pH lower than 4.8, insulin has a net positive charge of more than 1
  31. 31. Encapsulation efficiency of insulin with increasing amountsof drug (10–35 mg).
  32. 32. (E) Percentage of insulin release in simulated intestinal fluid (SIF) (pH7.4) after crosslinking with polyglutaraldehyde (0.1–1.0% v/v).(F) Percentage of microparticles by weight adhered to short segments(6 cm) of rat intestine after lectin functionalization with increasingamount of lectin (0.25–1.25 mg).
  33. 33. In vitro studiesDissolution profile of non-functionalized and lectin-functionalizedcarboxymethylated kappa-carrageenan microparticles in simulated gastric fluid(SGF) at 37 ◦C for 2 h, followed by simulated intestinal fluid (SIF) at 37 ◦C for 8 h.
  34. 34. In vitro insulin release kinetics• parameter n was calculated by fitting the release data into the power law, the average n value 1) for the non-functionalized microparticles is 0.45±0.06 2) for lectin-functionalized microparticles is 0.36±0.10
  35. 35. • For a spherical system, when (1) n ≤ 0.43, the release mechanism is diffusion-controlled (CaseI), (2) n ≥ 0.85, the release mechanism is swelling controlled (Case II) and (3) values between 0.43 and 0.89 present a mixed mode of a both diffusion- and swelling-controlled mechanisms (anomalous transport)• Thus, the release mechanism of insulin from nonfunctionalized microparticles is a mixed mode but is predominantly diffusion-controlled, whereas for lectin- functionalized microparticles, it is diffusion-controlled.
  36. 36. In vivo studies
  37. 37. CONCLUSION• This study clearly shows that insulin entrapped in lectin functionalized carboxymethylated kappa- carrageenan microparticles was protected from hydrolysis and proteolysis by stomach acids and enzymes.• Grafting of lectin (WGA) on the surface of the microparticles improves the interactions of these microparticles with the intestinal wall and enhances the absorption of insulin compared to the non-functionalized microparticles.
  38. 38. • The covalently bound, negatively charged sulfate groups in carboxymethylated kappa-carrageenan interact with the amino groups of the amino acid residues in insulin via ionic interactions that prevented the bulk release of insulin in the intestine, and these interactions imparted a sustained release of up to 12–24 h for the insulin entrapped in the microparticles in contrast to the rapid dissipation of the hypoglycemic effect of insulin via the parenteral route.
  39. 39. FUTURE PROSPECTS• lectin-functionalized oral formulation might serve as a promising alternative or as a complementary therapy to parenteral administration to provide better basal and prolonged hypoglycemic control.• Currently, oral insulin formulations such as Insugen (available commercially), and 4-CNAB and Capsulin (in clinical trials) show rapid insulin action that last no longer than 6–8 h.• While the insulin-loaded microparticles in this study showed prolonged glycemic control that lasted 12–24 h, and hence complement existing insulin formulations to provide for the basal insulin needs of the patient.
  40. 40. REFERENCES1. Andrews, G. P., Laverty, T. P., & Jones, D. S. (2009). Mucoadhesive polymeric platforms for controlled drug delivery. European Journal of Pharmaceutics and Biopharmaceutics, 71, 505– 518.2. Bies, C., Lehr, C. M., & Woodley, J. F. (2004). Lectin-mediated drug targeting: History and applications. Advanced Drug Delivery Reviews, 56, 425–435.3. Chowdary, K. P. R., & Rao, Y. S. (2004). Mucoadhesive microspheres for controlled drug delivery. Biological & Pharmaceutical Bulletin, 27, 1717–1724. Clark, M. A., Hirst, B. H., & Jepson, M. A. (2000). Lectin-mediated mucosal delivery of drugs and microparticles. Advanced Drug Delivery Reviews, 43, 207–223.4. Clement, S., Dandona, P., Still, J. G., & Kosutic, G. (2004). Oral modified insulin (HIM2) in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus: Results from a phase I/II clinical trial. Metabolism, 53, 54–58.5. Deeb, S. E., Preu, L., & Wätzig, H. (2007). Evaluation of monolithic HPLC columns for various pharmaceutical separations: Method transfer from conventional phases and batch to batch repeatability. Journal of Pharmaceutical & Biomedical Analysis, 44, 85–95.6. Gabor, F., Bogner, E., Weissenboeck, A., & Wirth, M. (2004). The lectin-cell interaction and its implications to intestinal lectin-mediated drug delivery. Advanced Drug Delivery Reviews, 56, 459–480.
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