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Introduction to    Research Data Management          Oxford Brookes UniversityFaculty of Technology, Design & Environment ...
The Digital Curation Centre• Consortium of 3 units in Universities of Bath  (UKOLN), Edinburgh (DCC Centre) and Glasgow (H...
DCC Mission                “Helping to build         capacity, capability and skills in         data management and curati...
“What’s it got to do with me?”Drivers and benefits to HEI’s developinginfrastructure and servicesto support research data ...
Introduction•   What is research data management?•   Why is it important?•   What risks does it address?•   What benefits ...
What is Research Data Management?            Caring for, facilitating access            Preserving and Adding value       ...
What Kinds of Data?…whatever is produced in research or evidences its outputs                                             ...
RDM… data centred project management•   Planning data management•   Creating data•   Naming and describing•   Storing acti...
An emerging art for institutionsA design space bounded by two principles…                                                B...
An emerging art for institutionsA design space bounded by two principles… and constraints                                 ...
An emerging art for institutionsA design space bounded by two principles… and constraints                                 ...
Why is RDM Important?Convergence in research policy“Rapid and  pervasive technologicalchange has created new ways ofacquir...
Why is RDM Important?Convergence in research policy“We have   opened up much publicdata already, but need to go muchfurthe...
Policy moves towards openness           Organisation for Economic Co-operation and           Development describes data as...
RCUK Common Principles on Data PolicyPublic good: Publicly funded research data are produced in the public interestshould ...
Funder ExpectationsEPSRC expects all those institutions it funds• to develop a roadmap that aligns their  policies and pro...
Funder Expectations                      17
Funder ExpectationsApplications submitted on or after 1st November 2012 will need to take account of thenew guidance and a...
Data Policies by Funderhttp://www.dcc.ac.uk/resources/policy-and-legal/overview-funders-data-policies                     ...
It’s not just top-down!• Data intensive research• Demand from public to engage, criticise• Citizen science – new stakehold...
It’s not just top-down!                          21
From citizen science…             Responding to more             demand for public             engagement             Crow...
…to digital engagementEstablished in e.g. planning and creative industriesNew opportunities from open data                ...
Public demand for data & engagement“We have   opened up much publicdata already, but need to go muchfurther in making this...
Open data in public governance                                 25
Open data in public governance                                 26
Open data in art and designbus routes data sculpture                                          •   “a 3D data sculpture of ...
…. University informationhttp://data.southampton.ac.uk/                                            28
…. and scholarly publication1. Deposit data inrepository2. Submit data paper•Context•Method•Data scope•Data description3. ...
Common practice in Universities‘Departments typically don’t have guidelines or norms for personal back-upand researcher pr...
Risks if you don’t address…• Loss of funding• Legal non-compliance DPA, FOI…etc.• Research integrity, reputation• Inabilit...
Risks if you don’t…• Loss of funding• Legal non-compliance DPA, FOI…etc.• Research integrity, reputation• Inability to ver...
Benefits if you do…• Secure storage for sensitive data• Improved access for scholarly communication• Scrutiny and verifica...
E.g. MaDAM projectPilot project offering secure storage, description, flexible sharing•“I can put my hands straight on my ...
Collaborationopportunities from data integration  HALOGEN(History, Archaeology, Linguistics, On                   omastics...
Collaborationopportunities from data integration  HALOGEN(History, Archaeology, Linguistics, On                   omastics...
Direct benefits from HALOGEN• New research opportunities   – Cross database work – seed new research samples• Verification...
Data access raises visibilityData with DOI = citeable research output                                           39
Taking it step by step…• Awareness and training• ‘Audits’ to assess current assets, practices and  requirements, gaps in p...
Who to involve?• Researcher(s)                     • Funders• Research support officers /       • Archive / long-term data...
Thank you!What are key issues for you…                               42
DCC support activitiesNeeds assessmentCARDIO Tool– collaborative assessment & benchmarking ofRDM strengths/weaknessesData ...
Roles & responsibilitiesLiz Lyon “The Informatics Transform: Re-Engineering Libraries for the Data    Decade” Internationa...
Roles & responsibilities                           45
Introduction to Research Data Management
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  1. 1. Introduction to Research Data Management Oxford Brookes UniversityFaculty of Technology, Design & Environment Dr Angus Whyte, DCC 27thSept 2012 This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 UK: Scotland License
  2. 2. The Digital Curation Centre• Consortium of 3 units in Universities of Bath (UKOLN), Edinburgh (DCC Centre) and Glasgow (HATII)• Launched 1st March 2004• National centre since 2004 – address challenges in digital curation that cross institutions or disciplines• Funded by JISC, plus HEFCE funding from 2011 for • support to national cloud services • targeted institutional development
  3. 3. DCC Mission “Helping to build capacity, capability and skills in data management and curation across the UK’s higher educationDCC Phase 3 research community”Business Plan
  4. 4. “What’s it got to do with me?”Drivers and benefits to HEI’s developinginfrastructure and servicesto support research data management. 4
  5. 5. Introduction• What is research data management?• Why is it important?• What risks does it address?• What benefits does it provide?• What is good practice? 5
  6. 6. What is Research Data Management? Caring for, facilitating access Preserving and Adding value to research data throughout its lifecycle. Organisation, Resources and Technology required to support and sustain. 6
  7. 7. What Kinds of Data?…whatever is produced in research or evidences its outputs 7
  8. 8. RDM… data centred project management• Planning data management• Creating data• Naming and describing• Storing active data• Selecting or disposing• Depositing and sharing• Protecting sensitive data• Licensing access 8
  9. 9. An emerging art for institutionsA design space bounded by two principles… Best way to make your data work for yourself is to make it work for someone else “Coolest things to do with your data will be thought of by someone else”* *Jo Walsh & Rufus Pollock Open Knowledge Foundation http://www.okfn.org/files/talks/xtech_2007/ 9
  10. 10. An emerging art for institutionsA design space bounded by two principles… and constraints Best way to make your data work for yourself is to make it work for someone else £££ “Coolest things to do with your data will be thought of by someone else”* *Jo Walsh & Rufus Pollock Open Knowledge Foundation http://www.okfn.org/files/talks/xtech_2007/ 10
  11. 11. An emerging art for institutionsA design space bounded by two principles… and constraints Best way to make your data work for yourself is to make it work for someone else REF £££ “Coolest things to do with your data will be thought of by someone else”* *Jo Walsh & Rufus Pollock Open Knowledge Foundation http://www.okfn.org/files/talks/xtech_2007/ 11
  12. 12. Why is RDM Important?Convergence in research policy“Rapid and pervasive technologicalchange has created new ways ofacquiring, storing, manipulatingand transmitting vast datavolumes, as well as stimulatingnew habits of communication andcollaboration amongst scientists.These changes challenge manyexisting norms of scientificbehaviour” 12
  13. 13. Why is RDM Important?Convergence in research policy“We have opened up much publicdata already, but need to go muchfurther in making this dataaccessible. We believe publiclyfunded research should be freelyavailable. We have commissionedindependent groups of academicsand publishers to review theavailability of publishedresearch, and to develop actionplans for making this freelyavailable” 13
  14. 14. Policy moves towards openness Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development describes data as a public good that should be made availableResearch Councils UK in its code of goodresearch conduct says data should be preservedand accessible for 10 years + ResearchFunder data policies increasingly demanding of institutional commitment and provisions... 14
  15. 15. RCUK Common Principles on Data PolicyPublic good: Publicly funded research data are produced in the public interestshould be made openly available with as few restrictions as possiblePlanning for preservation: Institutional and project specific data managementpolicies and plans needed to ensure valued data remains usableDiscovery: Metadata should be available and discoverable; Published resultsshould indicate how to access supporting dataConfidentiality: Research organisation policies and practices to ensurelegal, ethical and commercial constraints assessed; research process should notbe damaged by inappropriate releaseFirst use: Provision for a period of exclusive use, to enable research teams topublish resultsRecognition: Data users should acknowledge data sources and terms &conditions of accessPublic funding: Use of public funds for RDM infrastructure is appropriate andmust be efficient and cost-effective.http://www.rcuk.ac.uk/research/Pages/DataPolicy.aspx
  16. 16. Funder ExpectationsEPSRC expects all those institutions it funds• to develop a roadmap that aligns their policies and processes with EPSRC’s expectations by 1st May 2012;• to be fully compliant with these expectations by 1st May 2015.• Compliance will be monitored and non- compliance investigated.• Failure to share research data could result in the imposition of sanctions. 16
  17. 17. Funder Expectations 17
  18. 18. Funder ExpectationsApplications submitted on or after 1st November 2012 will need to take account of thenew guidance and application form requirements.The key changes are that:All proposals will be required to contain …a new ‘Technical Summary’Those with digital outputs or digital technologies that are essential to theirplanned research outcomes will be expected to submit a technicalattachment.Current technical appendix section of the Je-S form will be removed.http://www.ahrc.ac.uk/News-and-Events/News/Pages/Changes-to-all-AHRC-Research-Grant-and-Fellowships-applications.aspx 18
  19. 19. Data Policies by Funderhttp://www.dcc.ac.uk/resources/policy-and-legal/overview-funders-data-policies 19
  20. 20. It’s not just top-down!• Data intensive research• Demand from public to engage, criticise• Citizen science – new stakeholders in research• Digital engagement and open data in creative industries and built environment• Demands more planning and support 20
  21. 21. It’s not just top-down! 21
  22. 22. From citizen science… Responding to more demand for public engagement Crowd sourcing discovery Increases complexity of data management 22 22
  23. 23. …to digital engagementEstablished in e.g. planning and creative industriesNew opportunities from open data 23 23
  24. 24. Public demand for data & engagement“We have opened up much publicdata already, but need to go muchfurther in making this dataaccessible. We believe publiclyfunded research should be freelyavailable. We have commissionedindependent groups of academicsand publishers to review theavailability of publishedresearch, and to develop actionplans for making this freelyavailable” 24
  25. 25. Open data in public governance 25
  26. 26. Open data in public governance 26
  27. 27. Open data in art and designbus routes data sculpture • “a 3D data sculpture of the Sunday Minneapolis / St. Paul public transit system, where the horizontal axes represent directional movement and the vertical represents time. the piece titled "bus structure 2am-2pm" is constructed of 47 horizontal layers, each forming a map of the bus routes that run during a given interval of time. looking down from the top, one sees the Sunday bus map of the Twin Cities, while looking from the side, the times appears as strata building upwards. within each layer, every transit route that operates at that time isReusing public data to create an object represented by wood balls placed at its scheduled stops, connected by the horizontal copper rods. eachwith reuse value? route moves through time and space differently, carving out its own trail that may or may not meet conveniently with other routes. • in total 42 routes, 47 intervals of time & 296 bus stops are depicted by about a half-mile of copper rod & 6,000 wood balls, suspended in the air by hundreds of blue threadshttp://infosthetics.com/archives/2008/05/bus_routes_data_sculpture.html 27
  28. 28. …. University informationhttp://data.southampton.ac.uk/ 28
  29. 29. …. and scholarly publication1. Deposit data inrepository2. Submit data paper•Context•Method•Data scope•Data description3. Peer reviewed4. Data & paper DOIs DOI plus citation = career reward for data mgmthttp://openarchaeologydata.metajnl.com/ 29
  30. 30. Common practice in Universities‘Departments typically don’t have guidelines or norms for personal back-upand researcher procedure, knowledge and diligence varies tremendously.Many have experienced moderate to catastrophic data loss.’Incremental Project Scoping Study and Implementation Planhttp://www.lib.cam.ac.uk/preservation/incremental/documents/Incremental_Scoping_Report_170910.pdf‘The current environment is such that responsibility for good datamanagement is devolved to individual researchers and in practice PIs set therules and establish the cultural practices of the research groups and thismeans there is good data management practice going on in pockets but noconsistency across groups. There is also consequently a high risk of datalosses by a number of means’.MaDAM Project Requirements Analysishttp://www.merc.ac.uk/sites/default/files/MaDAM_Requirements%20_%20gap%20analysis-v1.4-FINAL.pdf 31
  31. 31. Risks if you don’t address…• Loss of funding• Legal non-compliance DPA, FOI…etc.• Research integrity, reputation• Inability to verify, scrutinise• Loss of data or (re)usability• Outputs lack visibility• Diminished public communication 32
  32. 32. Risks if you don’t…• Loss of funding• Legal non-compliance DPA, FOI…etc.• Research integrity, reputation• Inability to verify, scrutinise• Loss of data or (re)usability• Outputs lack visibility• Diminished public communication 33
  33. 33. Benefits if you do…• Secure storage for sensitive data• Improved access for scholarly communication• Scrutiny and verification of research• Research integrity, reputation• Secondary use and data mining• Opportunities for collaboration• Increased visibility, citation• Knowledge transfer, public communication Benefits from Infrastructure Projects in JISC MRD http://www.jisc.ac.uk/media/documents/programmes/m rd/RDM_Benefits_FinalReport-Sept.pdf 34
  34. 34. E.g. MaDAM projectPilot project offering secure storage, description, flexible sharing•“I can put my hands straight on my data, through one application”•“I can easily share & find data within my research group”•“I have support in data management planning”•“I can publish my data, under my control, with the wider community”•“I’m not repeating experiments unnecessarily”•“I’m freed up from some of my data management duties toconcentrate on my research”Researchers spending less time managing data, getting more valuefor their efforts and freeing more time for research. Benefits from Infrastructure Projects in JISC MRD http://www.jisc.ac.uk/media/documents/programmes/m rd/RDM_Benefits_FinalReport-Sept.pdf 35
  35. 35. Collaborationopportunities from data integration HALOGEN(History, Archaeology, Linguistics, On omastics, GENetics): Throwing light on the past through cross-disciplinary databasing Portable Antiquities Scheme (British Museum)  Place-names (Nottingham)  Surnames  Genetics  IT hosting and GIS Best practice: #JISCMRD, UKRDS, DCC, RIN , internatlional http://www.le.ac.uk/halogen
  36. 36. Collaborationopportunities from data integration HALOGEN(History, Archaeology, Linguistics, On omastics, GENetics): Throwing light on the past through cross-disciplinary databasing Portable Antiquities Scheme (British Museum)  Place-names (Nottingham)  Surnames  Genetics  IT hosting and GIS Best practice: #JISCMRD, UKRDS, DCC, RIN , internatlional http://www.le.ac.uk/halogen
  37. 37. Direct benefits from HALOGEN• New research opportunities – Cross database work – seed new research samples• Verification, re-purposing, re-use of data – Cleaning & enhancing private research datasets for reuse & correlation – Increased transparency – excellent training for best practice in research data management• Increasing research productivity – Build in cleaning, annotation, enhancement into normal research workflows – research datasets may immediately be reusable and interoperable• Impact & Knowledge Transfer – Reuse IT infrastructure: EU FP7 Mintweld (industrial engineering) & BRICCS National Health Service/University Trust data sharing.• Increasing skills base of researchers/students/staff
  38. 38. Data access raises visibilityData with DOI = citeable research output 39
  39. 39. Taking it step by step…• Awareness and training• ‘Audits’ to assess current assets, practices and requirements, gaps in provision• Identifying quick wins while developing long- term plan• Not reinventing: integrating, adapting, augmenting – e.g. policies, doctoral training, storage 40
  40. 40. Who to involve?• Researcher(s) • Funders• Research support officers / • Archive / long-term data project staff repository• Lab technicians • Senior management• Librarians / Data Centre staff • Others...• Faculty ethics committees• Institutional legal/IP advisors• FOI officer / DPA officer / records manager• Computing support• Institutional compliance officers 41
  41. 41. Thank you!What are key issues for you… 42
  42. 42. DCC support activitiesNeeds assessmentCARDIO Tool– collaborative assessment & benchmarking ofRDM strengths/weaknessesData Asset Framework– interviews to scope current RDMpractice and recommend improvementsWorkflow assessment – methodology for analysing current RDM Developing strategic institutional RDM frameworkworkflows Strategy development – getting key people together to discuss/plan for RDM Policy development – scoping, defining, embedding research data policiesDelivering support Costing - assist with the development of costing and pricing for RDMCustomisedData Management Plans – templates / guidance to servicesbe added to DMP Online Risk management - identify risks in RDM practice and recommendTraining – institutional/disciplinary tailored courses, online mitigationsresources Institutional data catalogues - recommend options for exposing metadataIncremental – repackaging existing support to raise awareness about your research data via CRIS systems, repositories, or a mix of theseand make guidance more meaningful to researchers 43
  43. 43. Roles & responsibilitiesLiz Lyon “The Informatics Transform: Re-Engineering Libraries for the Data Decade” International Journal of Digital Curation Volume 7, Issue 1 | 2012 44
  44. 44. Roles & responsibilities 45
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