Level 6 handling data answers

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  • 1. 1. (a) N 1 ! N identified only on scatter graph Accept provided unambiguous ! Highest total mark given Ignore if given with N If N is not given, accept a value between 82 and 83 inclusive (b) Indicates True and gives a correct explanation 1 eg • The range for coursework is 40, but the range for the test is 30 • Coursework goes from 10 to 50, test from 10 to 40 • Both start at 10 but coursework goes to 50 rather than to 40 Accept minimally acceptable explanation eg • 30, 40 seen • Highest to lowest is bigger for coursework marks than for test marks • Coursework marks spread over 8 squares of the graph, test marks over 6 squares • The points are more spread out along the x-axis than along the y-axis • They had a wider span of marks • There’s more variation in the cwk marks • They’re more scattered (or spread out) • C/w results start at the same mark as test results, but finish at a higher mark ! Ambiguous notation eg • Test marks 10 – 40 Coursework 10 – 50 Condone ! Incorrect use of % sign IgnoreQueensbury School 1
  • 2. Do not accept incomplete explanation eg • Coursework has a greater range than test marks • Coursework has lowest 10, highest 50 • Coursework went up to 50, test went up to 40 • Coursework goes from 10 to 50 but test goes from 10 to 30 except for 2 pupils • Coursework marks were varied, but test marks were mostly between 10 and 25 Do not accept incorrect explanation eg • The range for coursework was 40, but the range for test was 20 • The test marks are more scattered (c) 70 1 Accept value on the line excluded eg • More than 70 • Just over 70 • 71 ! Range of total marks given Accept provided all values win prizes eg, accept • At least 70 • 70 or more eg, do not accept • About 70 ! Incorrect use of % sign Ignore [3]2. (a) N 1 ! N identified only on scatter graph Accept provided unambiguous ! Highest total mark given Ignore if given with N If N is not given, accept a value betweenQueensbury School 2
  • 3. 82 and 83 inclusiveQueensbury School 3
  • 4. (b) Indicates True and gives a correct explanation 1 eg • The range for coursework is 40, but the range for the test is 30 • Coursework goes from 10 to 50, test from 10 to 40 • Both start at 10 but coursework goes to 50 rather than to 40 Accept minimally acceptable explanation eg • 30, 40 seen • Highest to lowest is bigger for coursework marks than for test marks • Coursework marks spread over 8 squares of the graph, test marks over 6 squares • The points are more spread out along the x-axis than along the y-axis • They had a wider span of marks • There’s more variation in the cwk marks • They’re more scattered (or spread out) • C/w results start at the same mark as test results, but finish at a higher mark ! Ambiguous notation eg • Test marks 10 – 40 Coursework 10 – 50 Condone ! Incorrect use of % sign Ignore Do not accept incomplete explanation eg • Coursework has a greater range than test marks • Coursework has lowest 10, highest 50 • Coursework went up to 50, test went up to 40 • Coursework goes from 10 to 50 but test goes from 10 to 30 except for 2 pupils • Coursework marks were varied, but test marks were mostly between 10 and 25Queensbury School 4
  • 5. Do not accept incorrect explanation eg • The range for coursework was 40, but the range for test was 20 • The test marks are more scattered (c) 70 1 Accept value on the line excluded eg • More than 70 • Just over 70 • 71 ! Range of total marks given Accept provided all values win prizes eg, accept • At least 70 • 70 or more eg, do not accept • About 70 ! Incorrect use of % sign IgnoreQueensbury School 5
  • 6. (d) Indicates the correct region, ie 2 50 40 30 20 10 0 0 10 20 30 40 50 Accept unambiguous indication of region eg • Correct region labelled R ! For 2m or 1m, lines dotted or dashed Accept unless the intention is only to indicate specific points ! Lines not ruled or accurate Accept provided the pupil’s intention is clear ! Line(s) drawn ‘below’ correct position in order to allow the region to include points on the line(s) Condone provided their line is parallel to the correct line, and is closer to the correct mark than to the correct mark –5 eg, for x + y = 65 accept • Line parallel to x + y = 65 and closer to x + y = 65 than to x p y = 60 or Indicates both the lines x = 25 and y = 25, even if there are other errors 1 or Indicates the line x + y = 65, even if there are other errors ! For 1m, line(s) not full length Accept provided each line spans at least 10 marks [5]3. Scatter graphs (a) Indicates a positive correlation, eg 1 • There is positive correlation between diameter and height • As diameter increases, height increases • Higher trees have wider trunks • Bigger trees are fatter • They both increase together Accept minimally acceptable response, eg • Big trees have big diametersQueensbury School 6
  • 7. Do not accept incomplete response, eg • It’s positive • Big trees have big heights • Higher trees are bigger Do not accept incorrect reference to proportion, eg • It’s directly proportional (b) Gives a correct explanation 1 The most common correct explanations: Refer to the trend in the data, eg • It would be too far away from the other points • It would be an outlier • It doesn’t fit the general trend • It would be a long way from the line of best fit • This diameter is far too big for the height • It is too small to have such a big diameter Give a value for the height or diameter if the tree were a poplar, eg • If it was a poplar you would expect it to be about 6 metres high • Poplars that are 3m high are only about 2cm in diameter Accept minimally acceptable explanation, eg • It’s on its own on the graph • It doesn’t fit the correlation • It doesn’t fit the pattern • It doesn’t have the same relationship • The diameter in cm is bigger than the height in m • The diameter is big but the height is small Do not accept incomplete or incorrect explanation, eg • It’s different from the others • It’s on its own • It doesn’t fit the graph • Poplar trees are tall and thin • It would not be on the line of best fit • It’s not in the same range • The diameter is too big • Poplar trees don’t have diameters bigger than their height • For poplars, diameter + 1 = heightQueensbury School 7
  • 8. ! Height for diameter of 5cm given Accept values in the range 5.5m to 7m inclusive ! Diameter for height of 3m given Accept values in the range 1cm to 2.3cm inclusive (c) Indicates a value between 4 and 5.2 inclusive 1 (d) Indicates that all four statements are false 2 or Makes three correct decisions 1 ! Indication other than ticks Accept only if unambiguous [5]4. Mice (a) 50 ± 2 1 (b) 55 ± 2 1 (c) Indicates ‘No’ and gives a correct explanation 1 The most common correct explanations: Refer to the fact that the number of mice is unknown eg • It’s only percentages, the real data is not shown • You need to know the actual numbers • It may be out of different amounts of mice • There may be more mice in homes close to woodland Refer to the limitations of percentage bar charts eg • The charts only allow you to compare the proportions Accept indicates ‘Yes’ and qualifies their decision by stating the assumption needed eg • Provided the total number of mice is about the same Accept minimally acceptable explanation eg • They’ve used % so you can’t tell • They only show the percentage • You don’t know how many mice were found altogetherQueensbury School 8
  • 9. ! Explanation specifies which location gets more mice The explanation must be the correct way round, ie le s s m o re Far C lo s e eg do not accept • There may be more mice in homes far from woodland ! Explanation refers to number of homes or people, rather than number of mice Condone these errors eg, accept • It may be out of different amounts of homes • They might have asked different amounts of people who • lived close to or far from woodland ! Irrelevant explanation If accompanied by a correct explanation, ignore eg, accept • There may be more mice close to woodland or the homes could be dirtier ! Explanation interprets the percentages in terms of probability, or states that the percentages may not be accurate eg • It doesn’t mean there must be more, just that it is more likely • There could be more mice that weren’t found Ignore if accompanying a correct response, otherwise do not accept [3]5. (a) Both values correct, ie 36 and 324, in either order. or 2 One correct value or Both values sum to 360, but none are 0, 90 or 180 1Queensbury School 9
  • 10. (b) Indicates ‘not possible to tell’, ie 1 [3]6. Horses (a) Indicates a positive relationship, eg: 1 • Positive correlation. • Its positive. • Direct correlation. • Tall horses are heavier. • Smaller horses are lighter. • The taller a horse grows the more it weighs. • As one goes up so does the other. • More mass, more height. Ignore qualifiers given within a correct response eg, accept • ‘It’s a good positive relationship.’ • ‘It’s fairly positive.’ Accept ‘bigger’ or ‘smaller’ used to describe mass or height (but not both) eg, accept • ‘Bigger horses are heavier.’ • ‘Bigger horses are taller.’ Accept responses that quantify the relationship, provided it is clear that it is an approximation. If the approximation is shown as a range, the values for the range must be within 2 ½ to 4 ½ times the height, or the converse eg, accept • ‘Mass is 2 ½ to 4 times the height.’ • ‘Height is a quarter to a third of the mass.’Queensbury School 10
  • 11. If the approximation is shown as a single value, the mass must be between 3 to 4 times the height, or the converse, or the approximation should indicate that for every extra 10cm of height the extra mass is between 80 to 90 kg, or the converse eg, accept • ‘Mass is approximately 3 × the height.’ • ‘Its mass is around 3.5 times the height.’ • ‘Height is about a quarter of the mass.’ • ‘It’s about 40kg for every extra 5cm height.’ Do not accept single values without indication that the relationship is approximate eg: • ‘Mass is 3 × the height.’ Accept proportionality eg: • ‘Height is proportional to mass.’ • ‘They are proportional.’ Do not accept responses that do not qualify the relationship eg: • ‘There is a relationship.’ • ‘Mass is always greater than height.’ • ‘They correlate.’ Do not accept a description of the graph or individual points on eg: • ‘It goes up.’ • ‘A horse that is 170cm weighs 650kg.’ • ‘Most horse had heights of about 150cm and masses of about 500kg.’ (b) Indicates a value between 580 and 595 inclusive. 1 (c) Indicates a value between 166.5 and 167.5 inclusive. 1Queensbury School 11
  • 12. (d) Indicates points all of which lie below the line y = x, eg 1 110 100 L en g th o f b a c k le g 9 0 (c m ) 80 70 70 80 90 100 110 • L e n g th o f f r o n t le g (c m ) Accept the graph shown as a set of points (minimum 2), or as a line, or as a curve. If 10 to 19 points are drawn, allow one point only to be an outlier outside the correct region. If 20 or more points are drawn, allow a maximum of two such outliers. or Indicates a line of best fit all of which lies below the line y = x, eg: 110 100 L en g th o f b a c k le g 9 0 (c m ) 80 70 70 80 90 100 110 • L e n g th o f f r o n t le g (c m ) Accept a correct description eg: • ‘All the points would be below a line drawn from (0, 0) at 45 degrees.’ • Ignore a line of best fit drawn in addition to a correct set of points. If only a line of best fit is drawn, accept either the beginning or the end to be on the line y = x. The correct region shaded, but do not accept only the line y = x drawn, unless it is clearly a boundary with the correct region identified eg, accept • the line y = x drawn on the graph and • ‘All the points are below this line.’ [4]7. Shoe laces (a) Correct plotting at (14, 130), within ± 2 mm 1 1 Other points plotted Ignore , as these may be from part (c)Queensbury School 12
  • 13. (b) Correct identification of (10, 70) 1Queensbury School 13
  • 14. (c) Value between 110 and 125 inclusive ! Range of answers given eg Between 115 and 120 Accept if all values are within 110 to 125 inclusive [3]Queensbury School 14