Passive Voice

13,957 views

Published on

ESL practice with the passive voice

Published in: Education, News & Politics
1 Comment
5 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Passive Voice understanding the verb be and
    Something very important before we begin looking at the passive voice
    the verb be
    Knowing how the verb be is used will help you avoid mistakes in your writing.
    First let’s look at the different forms of be .
    Present simple
    I am
    you/we/they are
    he/she/it is
    Present continuous
    I am being
    you/we/they are being
    he/she/it is being
    Past simple
    I/he/she/it was
    you/we/they were
    Past continuous
    I/he/she/it was being
    you/we/they were being
    Present perfect
    I/you/we/they have been
    He/she/it has been
    Past perfect
    Everyone had been
    Ok – so we know that the verb be has many forms.
    Now the important part!
    A sentence with the verb be as the main verb has three basic patterns (designs).
    be + a noun She is a student.
    be + an adjective She is intelligent.

    be + *a prepositional phrase She was in the
    classroom.
    * A prepositional phrase consists of a preposition and its object. For example: in the classroom, at the cinema, at your house, in the afternoon etc.
    Be is also used (as an auxiliary verb) in progressive verb tenses and in the passive.
    Progressive, sometimes called: continuous (verb +ing,):
    the student is writing a story, they are writing a story, the man was riding a bike etc.
    Passive (the verb be + past participle)
    The story is written by the student -The story was written by them -The bike was ridden by the man.
    Think about your use of be in each sentence.
    Use this mental checklist:
    Is it followed by a noun?
    Is it followed by an adjective?
    Is it followed by a prepositional phrase?
    Is it followed by verb + ing?
    Is it followed by a past participle (v3)?
    These are the only possibilities*. If your sentence
    does not fit one of these types in the checklist, then it
    is wrong.
    *One exception is when be follows the infinitive to do.
    What I want to do is learn the violin.
    What they had to do was swim to the shore.
    One thing I must do is buy a guard dog.
    So – anytime a verb follows be :
    it must be either verb + ing
    Or :
    it must be a past participle (verb 3)
    Let’s look at the formula for the passive voice.
    Subject + be + past participle (v3)
    Something really important about passive.
    Unlike active, in passive the subject receives the action.
    Consider the following sentences:
    A robber robbed a tourist.
    A policeman shot the robber.
    The newspapers reported the robbery.
    In a sentence, the verb shows action.
    Ask who or what the verb.
    If the subject does the verb, the sentence is active voice.
    If the subject receives the action the sentence is passive voice.
    Consider the following sentences:
    A robber robbed a tourist.
    A policeman shot the robber.
    The newspapers reported the robbery.
    Who/what robbed? A robber robbed
    Who/what shot? A policeman shot
    Who/what reported? Newspapers reported
    A robber robbed a tourist.
    A policeman shot the robber.
    The newspapers reported the robbery.
    The subject does the verb – active voice
    Now consider these sentences:
    A tourist was robbed (by a robber).
    The robber was shot by a policeman.
    The robbery was reported by the newspapers.
    The subjects received the action – passive voice
    A tourist was robbed (by a robber).
    The robber was shot by a policeman.
    The robbery was reported by the newspapers.
    We call this the passive voice because it is not a tense. Passive simply means that the subject receives the action and this can be in any tense.
    He is robbed each time he goes to that part of town.
    He was robbed.
    He has been robbed.
    He is being robbed.
    He was being robbed when……….. Etc.
    Challenge:
    Write at least one passive sentence for each of the following pictures.






    Something else you need to know about passive voice
    Some verbs don’t take objects. These verbs are called intransitive verbs and are shown in dictionaries as (IV).
    Intransitive verbs can’t be used in the passive voice.
    Look at the animations that follow and try writing active and passive sentences for each.



    That’s right! The verb cry is intransitive so it can’t be used in passive voice.
    Let’s continue.




    Slideshow created by Teacher Graeme
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here
No Downloads
Views
Total views
13,957
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
216
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
837
Comments
1
Likes
5
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Passive Voice

  1. 1. Passive Voice understanding the verb be and
  2. 2. <ul><li>Something very important before we begin looking at the passive voice </li></ul><ul><li>the verb be </li></ul>
  3. 3. <ul><li>Knowing how the verb be is used will help you avoid mistakes in your writing. </li></ul><ul><li>First let’s look at the different forms of be . </li></ul>
  4. 4. <ul><li>Present simple </li></ul><ul><li>I am </li></ul><ul><li>you/we/they are </li></ul><ul><li>he/she/it is </li></ul><ul><li>Present continuous </li></ul><ul><li>I am being </li></ul><ul><li>you/we/they are being </li></ul><ul><li>he/she/it is being </li></ul><ul><li>Past simple </li></ul><ul><li>I/he/she/it was </li></ul><ul><li>you/we/they were </li></ul><ul><li>Past continuous </li></ul><ul><li>I/he/she/it was being </li></ul><ul><li>you/we/they were being </li></ul>
  5. 5. <ul><li>Present perfect </li></ul><ul><li>I/you/we/they have been </li></ul><ul><li>He/she/it has been </li></ul><ul><li>Past perfect </li></ul><ul><li>Everyone had been </li></ul>
  6. 6. <ul><li>Ok – so we know that the verb be has many forms. </li></ul><ul><li>Now the important part! </li></ul>
  7. 7. <ul><li>A sentence with the verb be as the main verb has three basic patterns (designs).  </li></ul><ul><li>be + a noun She is a student. </li></ul><ul><li> </li></ul><ul><li>be + an adjective She is intelligent. </li></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul><ul><li>be + *a prepositional phrase She was in the </li></ul><ul><li>classroom. </li></ul><ul><li>* A prepositional phrase consists of a preposition and its object. For example: in the classroom, at the cinema, at your house, in the afternoon etc. </li></ul>
  8. 8. <ul><li>Be is also used (as an auxiliary verb) in progressive verb tenses and in the passive. </li></ul><ul><li>Progressive, sometimes called: continuous (verb +ing,): </li></ul><ul><li>the student is writing a story, they are writing a story, the man was riding a bike etc. </li></ul><ul><li>Passive (the verb be + past participle) </li></ul><ul><li>The story is written by the student -The story was written by them -The bike was ridden by the man. </li></ul>
  9. 9. <ul><li>Think about your use of be in each sentence. </li></ul><ul><li>  Use this mental checklist: </li></ul><ul><li>Is it followed by a noun? </li></ul><ul><li>Is it followed by an adjective? </li></ul><ul><li>Is it followed by a prepositional phrase? </li></ul><ul><li>Is it followed by verb + ing? </li></ul><ul><li>Is it followed by a past participle (v3)? </li></ul><ul><li>These are the only possibilities*. If your sentence </li></ul><ul><li>does not fit one of these types in the checklist, then it </li></ul><ul><li>is wrong. </li></ul>
  10. 10. <ul><li>*One exception is when be follows the infinitive to do. </li></ul><ul><li>What I want to do is learn the violin. </li></ul><ul><li>What they had to do was swim to the shore. </li></ul><ul><li>One thing I must do is buy a guard dog. </li></ul>
  11. 11. <ul><li>So – anytime a verb follows be : </li></ul><ul><li>it must be either verb + ing </li></ul><ul><li>Or : </li></ul><ul><li>it must be a past participle (verb 3) </li></ul>
  12. 12. <ul><li>Let’s look at the formula for the passive voice. </li></ul><ul><li>Subject + be + past participle (v3) </li></ul>
  13. 13. <ul><li>Something really important about passive. </li></ul><ul><li>Unlike active, in passive the subject receives the action. </li></ul><ul><li>Consider the following sentences: </li></ul>
  14. 14. <ul><li>A robber robbed a tourist. </li></ul><ul><li>A policeman shot the robber. </li></ul><ul><li>The newspapers reported the robbery. </li></ul>
  15. 15. <ul><li>In a sentence, the verb shows action. </li></ul><ul><li>Ask who or what the verb. </li></ul><ul><li>If the subject does the verb, the sentence is active voice. </li></ul><ul><li>If the subject receives the action the sentence is passive voice. </li></ul>
  16. 16. <ul><li>Consider the following sentences: </li></ul><ul><li>A robber robbed a tourist. </li></ul><ul><li>A policeman shot the robber. </li></ul><ul><li>The newspapers reported the robbery. </li></ul>
  17. 17. <ul><li>Who/what robbed? A robber robbed </li></ul><ul><li>Who/what shot? A policeman shot </li></ul><ul><li>Who/what reported? Newspapers reported </li></ul>
  18. 18. <ul><li>A robber robbed a tourist. </li></ul><ul><li>A policeman shot the robber. </li></ul><ul><li>The newspapers reported the robbery. </li></ul><ul><li>The subject does the verb – active voice </li></ul>
  19. 19. <ul><li>Now consider these sentences: </li></ul><ul><li>A tourist was robbed (by a robber). </li></ul><ul><li>The robber was shot by a policeman. </li></ul><ul><li>The robbery was reported by the newspapers. </li></ul><ul><li>The subjects received the action – passive voice </li></ul>
  20. 20. <ul><li>A tourist was robbed (by a robber). </li></ul><ul><li>The robber was shot by a policeman. </li></ul><ul><li>The robbery was reported by the newspapers. </li></ul>
  21. 21. <ul><li>We call this the passive voice because it is not a tense. Passive simply means that the subject receives the action and this can be in any tense. </li></ul><ul><li>He is robbed each time he goes to that part of town. </li></ul><ul><li>He was robbed. </li></ul><ul><li>He has been robbed. </li></ul><ul><li>He is being robbed. </li></ul><ul><li>He was being robbed when……….. Etc. </li></ul>
  22. 22. <ul><li>Challenge: </li></ul><ul><li>Write at least one passive sentence for each of the following pictures. </li></ul>
  23. 29. Something else you need to know about passive voice
  24. 30. <ul><li>Some verbs don’t take objects. These verbs are called intransitive verbs and are shown in dictionaries as (IV). </li></ul>
  25. 31. <ul><li>Intransitive verbs can’t be used in the passive voice. </li></ul><ul><li>Look at the animations that follow and try writing active and passive sentences for each. </li></ul>
  26. 35. <ul><li>That’s right! The verb cry is intransitive so it can’t be used in passive voice. </li></ul><ul><li>Let’s continue. </li></ul>
  27. 40. <ul><li>Slideshow created by Teacher Graeme </li></ul>

×