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Government systems
 

Government systems

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    Government systems Government systems Presentation Transcript

    • Government Systems Unitary, Confederation, Federal Unit 12 Notes
    • What is a government system?
      • Every country has a government that is set up in it own distinct way.
      • One thing that a country has to decide on is how to organize its government and distribute its power.
      • There are 3 main ways governments spread their power:
        • unitary
        • confederation
        • federal
    • Unitary Government
      • The central government possesses most of the decision-making power and authority.
        • operates all levels of government in the country
        • assigns power to state & local government
    •  
    • Examples of Unitary Governments
      • Many countries in the world are run this way.
        • Western Hemisphere: Cuba & Bolivia
        • Europe: United Kingdom & France
      • Unitary is not the structure of the US government. Our Congress does not have the power to dissolve state legislatures or appoint governors.
    • Unitary Governments of the World
    • Questions to Consider
      • How is power distributed in a unitary government?
    • Questions to Consider
      • How is power distributed in a unitary government?
        • A central government assigns power and duties to the smaller units of government within the country.
    • Questions to Consider
      • How is power distributed in a unitary government?
        • A central government assigns power and duties to the smaller units of government within the country.
      • True or False: In a unitary government, the national government could remove the governor of a state and pick a new one.
    • Questions to Consider
      • How is power distributed in a unitary government?
        • A central government assigns power and duties to the smaller units of government within the country.
      • True or False: In a unitary government, the national government could remove the governor of a state and pick a new one.
        • True
    • Questions to Consider
      • How is power distributed in a unitary government?
        • A central government assigns power and duties to the smaller units of government within the country.
      • True or False: In a unitary government, the national government could remove the governor of a state and pick a new one.
        • True
      • France, UK, Bolivia, and Cuba – what do these countries have in common?
    • Questions to Consider
      • How is power distributed in a unitary government?
        • A central government assigns power and duties to the smaller units of government within the country.
      • True or False: In a unitary government, the national government could remove the governor of a state and pick a new one.
        • True
      • France, UK, Bolivia, and Cuba – what do these countries have in common?
        • They all have unitary government systems.
    • Confederation Governments
      • Some countries agree that they would be better able to solve problems or provide help if they worked together.
      • They might sign a treaty or a constitution under which the countries agree to defend each other, trade with each other, use a common currency, etc.
        • This is called a confederation government.
      • Membership is usually voluntary & a country can decide to leave at any time.
    •  
    • Confederation Governments
      • Not commonly found among governments in the 21st century because there are several problems with them.
        • often have little power because a high percentage of members must agree to decisions made
        • individual countries can veto decisions
        • changes in the constitution requires all members to agree
      • Confederations generally have a weak central government.
    • Example: Commonwealth of Nations
      • Australia is a member of the Commonwealth of Nations.
        • This is a very weak association of member countries that were once part of the British empire.
        • Some recognize the Queen as the head of state; others do not.
      • It works to promote trade & solutions to common problems among members but cannot force members to do things.
    • Questions to Consider:
      • What is one problem with a confederation government?
    • Questions to Consider:
      • What is one problem with a confederation government?
        • The central government can create laws but might not be able to enforce them.
    • Questions to Consider:
      • What is one problem with a confederation government?
        • The central government can create laws but might not be able to enforce them.
      • In a confederation, government power lies with the
    • Questions to Consider:
      • What is one problem with a confederation government?
        • The central government can create laws but might not be able to enforce them.
      • In a confederation, government power lies with the
        • governments of the member countries/states.
    • Federal Government
      • In a federal form of government, power is divided between a central government & small divisions, such as states.
      • A document (such as a constitution) may describe the rights, responsibilities, and duties of the central government & the states.
      • Central government can be powerful, but it does not have the ability to dissolve states or choose state leaders.
    •  
    • Australia’s Federal System
      • The 6 states in Australia represent the 6 British colonies that joined to create the Commonwealth of Australia.
        • There are also 2 territories.
        • Power is split between the central government and the states.
      • The Constitution of Australia is the law of the land.
        • It defines how power is shared between national, state, & local governments.
      • The first constitution gave the government the right to pass laws on certain subjects & allowed the states to keep all other lawmaking rights.
        • federal government: military & agreements with other countries
        • state governments: education & state police
    • Questions to Consider:
      • How does a federal system of government divide power?
    • Questions to Consider:
      • How does a federal system of government divide power?
        • between the central government and smaller units such as states
    • Questions to Consider:
      • How does a federal system of government divide power?
        • between the central government and smaller units such as states
      • What defines the rights, responsibilities, & duties of the central & state governments?
    • Questions to Consider:
      • How does a federal system of government divide power?
        • between the central government and smaller units such as states
      • What defines the rights, responsibilities, & duties of the central & state governments?
        • a constitution