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Noir Comics

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Presentation on crime, noir, and detective comics …

Presentation on crime, noir, and detective comics
NYU Global Noir
Spring 2009

Published in: Entertainment & Humor

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  • I really liked this presentation. I was looking for film noir but this would really interest young people as another way of approaching the topic.
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Transcript

  • 1. ‘ Dark’ Comics Born out of Crime Comics genre
  • 2. Frank Miller Sin City (1991)
  • 3. Early 1900s set the stage for comic books “ Hogan’s Alley” a.k.a. The Yellow Kid
  • 4. Chester Gould’s Dick Tracy (1931) Competition: Secret Agent X-9 by Dashiell Hammett
  • 5. Originally named National Allied Publications (1934) but changed to DC in 1936. After WWII starts in 1939, heroes dominate.
  • 6. Crime and detective comics pop up in newspaper supplements. Will Eisner’s The Spirit (1940)
  • 7. Charles Biro’s Crime Does Not Pay (1942) marks the beginning of the genre
  • 8. 1940s
    • 1944 –Bill Gaines creates EC comics
    • 1945 – Comic book burnings
    • 1948 – 80 – 100 million purchased monthly,
    • making $72 million yearly .
    • Association of Comic Magazine Publishers (ACMP) creates 1 st self- Imposed Comics Code:
    • “ suggested” rules.
  • 9. Only 14/35 publishers participate in the ACMP. Market is not greatly affected in ’48. Mass media, Catholic schools and women’s magazines/clubs continue to vilify comics. Targeted by local bans and boycotts. Burnings continue through ’49.
  • 10. 1950s
    • Early 1950s – J. McCarthy.
    • 1953 - Subcommittee hearings on juvenile delinquency. Witnesses include Bill Gaines and Frederic Wertham.
    • 1954 – ACMP becomes Comic Magazine Association of America (CMAA). Comics Code Authority forms.
    • CCA screens with stricter code.
    • 1955 – Inspires actual legislation, including in NY.
    • 1957 – Stan Lee closes Atlas/Timely/Marvel Comics.
  • 11. Comics Code
    • No disrespect for established authority. Includes police, judges, government officials.
    • No details of a crime.
    • No use of the word “horror” or “terror.”
    • No lurid or gory pictures.
    • No slang, obscenities, or vulgar words & symbols.
    • No zombies, ghouls, cannibals, torture, vampirism, or werewolfism.
    • No racy or sexy scenes.
    • No exaggerated female bodies.
    • Respectful behavior only.
    • Respect of the sanctity of marriage.
  • 12. ’ 70s – ’80s
    • Comics Specialty Stores enables Direct Market Sales.
    • Dedicated fan-bases.
    • Publishers big and small gain audiences.
    • Super hero comics dominate.
        • Frank Miller, Daredevil , ’79
        • Max Allan Collins & Terry Beaty, Ms. Tree , ’81
        • Miller, The Dark Knight , ‘86
  • 13.  
  • 14.