Dragons Den Pitch

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  • 1. By Kathryn Gray, Hannah Gray, Michaella Smith, Mishka English, Charlotte Durnell Dragon’s Den for Designers: The Pitch Play Box
  • 2. The Idea Pitch Idea The idea is to create a production aimed at a young audience aged between 3-5 years of age. Use interactive methods to build a puppet with the help of the audience. Use little dialogue. Use beanbags as seating arrangement for the children. Visual language: bright, bold, big, shinny. Touch: soft, hard, furry, rough. Sounds that relate to environments chosen by members of the audience. Narrative invented by the audience.
  • 3. Why this Idea?
    • After visiting our three different theatres and watching the three productions all aimed at different age groups, we found children's theatre the most inspiring. Giving us a larger area of exploration.
    • For all of us involved this type of theatre that was based around the exploration of play by children was a new concept and something that we had never experienced before. Therefore by basing our pitch around children's theatre we hope to expand this theatre genre.
  • 4. The Venue
    • We have chosen the Lakeside Theatre as the venue for our production for the following reasons;
    • It is a versatile studio space which will allow us to explore different seating arrangements using beanbags, due to the removable seating.
    • The theatre space is not too large, creating a good level of intimacy between the performance and the audience. This is especially good when working with young children as it will keep their attention focused.
    The Lakeside Arts Centre Nottingham
  • 5. The Pitch Rough sketch of layout Curved backdrop Misshaped carpet Beanbags Play Box Theatre
  • 6. The Pitch Costumes are designed as dungarees with tee shirts, and a basic geometrical shape on the front, which are things the children will recognize. For the two actors and the musician they can each have a different combination of the colours, and a different shape, such as a square and triangle.
  • 7. The Pitch
    • A curved background will help to enclose the large space and make the young audience feel more secure within their new environment. It will be light blue in colour with a Velcro surface.
    • The misshaped carpet will make the hard wooden floor softer for the children to play on as well as making the environment more aesthetically pleasing and appealing to them.
    • Beanbags will be placed on the carpet. The purpose of these are to bring the audience closer to the performance/actor, creating a more intimate experience as well as creating a fun and comfortable seating arrangement.
    • When the children enter the theatre space, two boxes full of different materials and objects suitable for puppet making will be situated within the carpeted area.
  • 8. The Audiences Experience
    • There will be a maximum of ten children entering the space at any one time with accompanying adults.
    • The children will be split evenly into two groups with each group being allocated to an actor.
    • Once seated on their beanbags, parents close behind, the children will, through the experience of play be encouraged by the actor to collect objects from their groups box and put them together to create a puppet.
    • The actors/puppeteers will then control their groups puppet.
    • A narrative will be created when the two puppets interact with one another, also allowing the two groups of children to interact. When the two puppets begin to form a friendship, the two groups will also form friendships.
  • 9. The Audiences Experience
    • Now together as a whole group, the children will add to the narrative, choosing the environment in which the scene will be set.
    • This will be done with the help of the actors placing different felt shapes and objects onto the curved Velcro backdrop with the children. The felt can be a mixture of shapes and colours that could be interpreted as different scenic items such as: clouds, trees, birds, water etc.
    • According to the environment that the children choose to create different sound, lighting can be prompted and incorporated by the lighting and sound technicians e.g. The sounds of trees rustling, wind blowing, birds chirping and rain falling etc.
  • 10. The Audiences Experience
    • After approximately 45 minutes the actors will bring the production to an end by the puppets saying goodbye and going to sleep, the children will say goodbye to their new friends and go back to their parents.
    • We hope that the children will leave the theatre having had an enjoyable experience and wanting to return.
  • 11. Individual Reviews
    • The Lace Market Theatre Trust Ltd production of
    • The Good and Faithful Servant,
    • As a whole, The Lace Market Theatre, had a sense of pettiness about it, and failed miserably as an appropriate performance space. This was not helped at all by the performance, which was at times not only tiring but painful to watch. I actually made the decision to walk out ¾ of the way through, after bearing as much as I possibly could. In all honesty it was the first time I had seen a piece of theatre of that nature and sadly it bored me to bits. I respect the fact that Joe Orton is a writer of some great classics; however it was not my type of drama and was therefore unable to appreciate ‘The Good and Faithful Servant’ for what it was.
    • I personally did not see the play as a success, there was a lot of over acting with a real amateur annoyingness to it. Sitting amongst an audience of OAPS and no one below the age of 35 was at times uncomfortable because they appeared to be more informed with the play. Also a majority of the people in the audience appeared to know one another and be regular theatre goers, which made sense due to the Lace Market Theatre being a small and very much independent theatre, with members and Trust funding.
    • The audience close proximity to the acting space meant that plays which involved an audience in some way, like in ‘The Good and Faithful Servant’, worked ‘unfortunately’ very well. The audience was further involved in the play, due to the centre isle being used as one of the very few entrance and exit points onto the “stage area”.
    • Due to the space being like that of an attic room, I can appreciate why the seats were laid out in non gradient rows. However due to this assembly layout, and the fact that very little of the performance took place within, the tiny “proscenium” stage, meant visual analysis of what was going on, when sitting beyond the second row, was non existent, as the performance was mainly acted out at seat level itself.
    • The Lace Market Theatre certainly had a lot of charm and to a certain extent was comfortable to be in, nothing like sitting in a vast auditorium but more like a pub, this was not helped by the fact that the “auditorium” contained a bar area.
    • I do value my experience at the Lace Market Theatre as both fascinating and educational, and would like to see how other genres of plays performed within this small, difficult but challenging theatre space. There is very little room for scenic art which suggests that any performance would make major use of props and costume to imply settings and characters. Nothing in particular would have helped to enhance my experience at the Lace Market Theatre, except going to see different genre of play, like a take on Shakespeare or a black comedy.
    • Michaella Smith
  • 12.
    • Travelling Light Theatre Company
    • ‘ Shadow Play’ Review
    • ‘ Shadow Play’ was a piece of children’s theatre put on at the Lakeside Arts centre, by the theatre company Travelling Light.
    • Aimed at an audience of 2-6 years and of course the odd parent, the shows aim was to break boundaries such as language, to introduce and include children in the realm of theatre with a visually exciting and fun performance. A lively combination of mime, dance, sound, light and object theatre helped to achieve this. Verbal communication was kept to a bare minimum, mainly sound effects; say to indicate the hissing of a snake, and a palette of objects such as paper, paint and “balloons” to keep the young audience engaged, as each individual could relate, to what was happening in some way.
    • Due to Health and Safety reasons, the children were not allowed to interact with the characters/performance, therefore the use of a studio space, such as the Lakeside Arts Centre, was in my opinion an appropriate venue, as being close to the performance was essential, to capture and maintain that sense of involvement and reaction between the children and the piece of theatre.
    • Being a theatre design student and going too see a piece of children’s theatre, at the Lakeside, proved to be a fun, educational introduction. Going to see a piece of theatre aimed at an audience so young allowed me to gain an understanding, to take note of the success but also challenging aspects of this type of theatre.
    • There was no real narrative to the performance except a beginning in which the characters would capture a relation to the audience, and an ending in which the characters would say ‘goodbye to the audience’ breaking that bond, with the middle focusing on maintaining the audience imagination through the investigation of play. The whole performance was done with such profession capturing all aspects of theatre from light, sound, set and props, but with a more relaxed well paced atmosphere.
    • The simplicity of the set, constructed out of a wooden frame and stretched paper acted as an ‘off’ stage screen, with areas of this structure being ripped and broken through at the start of the play to reveal the 3 actors and musician. A characteristic I particularly liked about this performance was the inclusion of the composer/music director in the performance. Seated slightly raised and towards stage left, the children had full view of the selection of musical instruments and the involvement each instrument had with different sections of the performance. This helped the young audience to relate to this characteristic of theatre visually in the performance. Like most aspects, light was kept simple yet sufficiently impressive with a combination of ‘actor’ incorporated light effects and rigged lighting.
    • Overall the experience proved to be very inspirational, and cannot think of anything, as such, that would have enhanced the experience, apart from personally seeing the kids have some active involvement with the performance or grouped around the performance space, instead of being restricted to the ridged rows. However this would have changed the style and happenings within the performance dramatically, and would not have been ‘Shadow Play’.
    • By Michaella Smith
  • 13.
    • Part 1 – The Review
    • Play – Shadow Play.
    • Venue – The Lakeside Arts Centre, Studio Theatre.
    • Shadow play was a production aimed at children aged 2-6 years old and based around the experimental play of young children. Due to this fact the audience that were viewing the production were children aged from around the age of 1 up to the age of 4 or 5, including the parent guardians of these children and the babies that the parents brought along with them.
    • During the production no actual dialogue was used, the main source of communication being exaggerated mime, suggestive sign language and gestures as well as facial expression. All of methods were used to tell the story throughout the piece due to the fact that the younger children may not have much speech and a lot of talking between actors may lead to confusion and a lack of interest.
    • As part of the narrative within the production, objects and activities were being used and played with such as different coloured balls, lights and paints. The actors used these objects and materials in a very play-like, childish manner.
    • From the production that I went to see the piece worked very successfully as a piece of theatre and as a piece of entertainment. The majority of the audience stayed focused on the production and did not seem to be distracted by others around them, which seems to be the hardest thing to accomplish in children’s theatre due to short attention spans. The way this was achieved was by engaging the audience’s attention in activities that they could associate with, things that they may have done at school or played with at home with parents, also by having a variety of different activities so that the children were not getting bored watching the same thing for a long amount of time.
    • Watching the reactions to events helped me to understand how a young audiences imagination could be captured and explored. At certain points they were standing up, reaching out to the stage and actors also pointing and laughing at the actors, almost as though the children were part of the production and experience without them physically being on the stage.
    • What confirmed the piece was successful for me was at the end of the piece the actors waved goodbye form behind a lit screen creating a silhouette, at this point nearly every child in the audience waved and/or shouted bye to the characters, confirming how close the children felt to the characters they had just met.
    • This studio theatre is a fairly small space but can also be very versatile in how it is set out. Due to this fact i think it creates an ideal theatrical space for younger audiences and children because you can be sat close to the acting area when the removable seating is in position, creating an intimate, unique atmosphere to any production. This space however can be opened up into an exhibition space where all the seating is retracted back and hidden to create a walk-in or (untraditional) theatre experience.
    • The location of the theatre itself is in the outskirts of the Nottingham University campus. It is a modern looking building with lawns to most sides of it, giving the theatre a good friendly atmosphere and overall making it a pleasant place to be.
    • The only way i can think of to enhance this performance for the specified audience would be to give the children the opportunity to interact with the set and the characters at some point within the production, either all the way through or just for 10 minutes at the end of the piece. After all this was a piece based around the play of children it seemed strange that the children were not allowed to play but just had to watch.
    • Kathryn Gray
  • 14.
    • Trent Dance- Production of “Fame”
    • Review
    • ‘ Fame the musical’ was brought to The Royal Concert Hall, Nottingham, by the amateur group Trent dance, on Monday 18th February 08’, to a “full” audience.
    • Overall I feel that as a piece of theatre, the production lacked the sense of profession and structure expected, because the performance was well advertised both within the student population/ general public and was performed at one of Nottingham’s main theatres. However excluding the dreadful sound technicalities and at times sloppy dancing, this piece of amateur theatre was not bad at all, resulting in a satisfactory piece of entertainment. There appeared to be a wave of general disappointment; amongst the students as they left the theatre, perhaps due to the fact, that there was a lot of pre performance hype, resulting, possibly, in expectation being set too high. After all Trent Dance is only an armature group, who had a good stab at performing in a professional well publicised theatre, that may not have been spot on as a performance but certainly was a success at pulling in an audience and possibly resulting in the largest turn out of university students, to fill the auditorium.
    • As a theatre design student going to see an amateur performance at Nottingham’s Royal Concert Hall, was an enjoyable experience especially seems has this particular performance drew in a large audience of students some of which aren’t regular theatre goers or wouldn’t even normally go. This to me seemed a brave act by the producing house but also in someway a success, even though ticket prices were half the price.
    • The set design was an interesting permanent on stage structure, consisting of two levels and adjustable steps, adding height and intricate subtle, yet significant set changes, to suggest exterior and school settings, accentuated by the bringing on and off of props, which was often incorporated into the performers roles. The grandeur of the set was spoken when an American yellow cab was rolled onto the stage from upstage and parked underneath the existing set design to
    • There only appeared to be two ‘stage hands’ adjusting the set in a phantom stance, with no real attention being drawn away from the performance.
    • The costumes were bright vibrant and well created, capturing the atmosphere personalities and time period of Fame.
    • Overall the experience was enjoyably. Personally it was great to see a large student audience, which created a hyped environment within the theatre. It was a real shame about the sound, as this really did ruin the performance and underestimated the production and all the hard work that I you could see had gone into it by all those that took part.
    • By Michaella Smith
  • 15.
    • Play – Fame.
    • Venue – The Royal Concert Hall, Commercial theatre.
    • Fame was an amateur musical production, produced for a one night only performance by the Nottingham Trent Dance Society, due to this the audience seemed to be mostly friends and family of the performers including a large number of students from Nottingham Trent University. This encouraged a wide audience and saw an age range from around late teens up to late 50’s and 60’s.
    • Those audience members that were not friends and family of the performers in the production will probably have been fans of musical theatre as they do not tend to attract every theatre-goer but only a proportion.
    • I personally query the success of the production as a piece of entertainment, this is because although the performance of the actors, singers and dancers was impressive and worked well as a piece of theatre there were technical difficulties throughout the performance. These being that when a character was giving a speech microphones were failing, this let the actor down, putting extra pressure onto them to project their voices further, my view on this was that the production only lasted the one night, the least that could be done would be to make sure all equipment was working sufficiently, for everything to work together to create a successful piece of theatre.
    • The staging area for the production seemed a little strange to me, i felt that due to the fact that the stage of the Royal Concert Hall is relatively large but the set for the piece was a small piece of scenery/set that then had blackout curtains pulled up to it. This created the feeling for me that there was too much empty (black) space that to me needed to be broken up somehow.
    • The theatre itself is a modern and attractive building that is brightly lit through the night and is situated in the city centre of Nottingham. It is close to pubs, bars and a number of restaurants, giving the audience the opportunity to turn their theatre experience into a theatre night out or an event.
    • I think that the main way that could of enhanced the experience of this performance would be to watch the piece with fully working technical equipment so that the audience would not have to strain to hear the piece.
    • Kathryn Gray
  • 16.
    • y – The Good and Faithful Servant.
    • Venue – The Lace Market Theatre.
    • The Good and Faithfull Servant was what i believe to be an amateur production that was produced solely by the theatre’s members. This piece was one that ran for approximately 5 days, it was, what seemed like a tragic, post war play that also contained a light hearted, quirky feel to it.
    • The night i went to view the performance was to opening night of this play, the audience on this night were mainly members/ patrons of the theatre this was so obviously the case as everybody knew one-another. The age range was from around mid 60’s up to 80+ with very few younger audience members, for these people the interest in theatre was more of a retirement hobby or something to do to pass the time as well as their social circle.
    • I think that the play was successful, more so however for the members of the theatre and the people involved than for us who had no attachments or ties to the theatre or the actors. The majority of the audience seemed to thoroughly enjoy the production, I found it rather quirky and funny but I think this was for the wrong reasons and found myself wanting to laugh in inappropriate places because of the mentality of some of the acting but due to the closeness of the audience to the acting space i had to compose myself for respect of the actors and others around me.
    • In places I found the performance slightly intimidating due to the fact that one actress occasionally walked into the audience and talking to people as though they were part of the play, this begun to make me feel uncomfortable and nervous of what they were going to do next.
    • The space that was being used to produce this play was what could only be described as a room; it was a reasonable sized room on the upper floor of one of the Lace Market buildings. When entering the space it felt like you were walking through an old house or a similar environment, passing through old doors along carpeted corridors because the theatre space was in the upper half of the old building there were supporting beams overhead, this gave the space a unique, unconventional feel. These beams were used as the lighting rigs which i thought was a nice touch as then the rustic environment was not cluttered with obtrusive metal fixtures.
    • Seating within the space was removable office type chairs set out in rows looking towards a small room that was almost suspended in the back wall of the theatre space with a few steps leading from this onto a small area just in front of the audience. The scene was set using a limited amount of props only, in the small room was a bed that was offset slightly in the space, then in the main acting area there was one table at either end of the space, one set out as a dining table on stage left with a few chairs around it and one on stage right set as on office desk with a chair at either side. Due to the limitations of the space the audience were in close proximity to the acting.
    • The location of the Lace Market Theatre itself was hidden away on a very quite under lit street of Nottingham, through the day there were no signs indicating its presence at all, then when we went to go and watch the production there was just one small notice board, very few people seemed to know of its existence never mind where it was, this seemed strange to me but then when we saw the community of people within the theatre i thought that maybe the members like it this way with very little intruders into their space.
    • If there was a factor that could enhance my experience it would be if we were able to find the theatre easier and not have to search round the Lace Market trying to find it in the icy wind.
    • Kathryn Gray
  • 17. Travelling Light Theatre Company ‘Shadow Play’ Review
    • ‘ Shadow Play’ has been one of my more rewarding experiences as a theatre goer, and I was overjoyed with this production. Despite it’s being aimed at young children I found myself being drawn into the wonder that the performers were creating, and enjoyed every minute of it.
    • The show was conceived for small children, and many factors of the production supported the overall objective of introducing children to the theatre experience; there was virtually no recognisable language used, but instead easily comprehendible sounds; the set and costumes were very docile and uncomplicated, the clothing is soft, mute colours, and the set a simple wood and paper structure; there were recognisable ‘symbols’ for the children, such as balls, pillows and balloons.
    • The piece explored the idea of play in a performing space, a subject that children would easily identified. Also, despite the interaction between performer and audience being quite limited, there was an introduction and a farewell on the actor’s part, breaking the boundaries and taking away the fear factor the children may have experienced when confronted with these people, when they are already sat in an unfamiliar and dark space.
    • The thing I enjoyed about the production in terms of performance was a beautiful short sequence where an actor stood in front of a paper screen with a low blue wash over him, whilst torches of different sizes were pushed onto the back of the paper, creating the illusion of fireflies that then interacted with him. However, from an audience point of view I loved the fact that when the actors stood behind the backlit screen to wave goodbye every single child in the theatre was waving back, despite the actors not being able to see them. To me, if these people had been able to establish that kind of relationship with their target audience then they had achieved their aims.
    • Mishka English
  • 18. How does Theatre Work differently to a Filmic Experience of a night out/ In What ways do designers and Producers Work need to Reflect on these Issues? INDIVIDUAL RESPONES
    • Personally I feel that the most important factor that charts the difference between a theatrical and filmic experience is the intimacy of a theatre based performance between something you witness on a screen.
    • When you are seated watching live people in front of you, and you can see every expression, hear every word clear as a bell, live, there is more intensity in it, and you feel more as though you are a fly on the wall in these peoples’ universe.
    • However, many are losing out on this experience because Theatre has been somewhat stereotyped and besmirched. For one thing people believe that every theatre ticket costs an arm and a leg. For another there is the idea that only a certain ‘class’ of people go and see something in the theatre.
    • Furthermore, thanks to people like Andrew Lloyd Webber, people these days tend to think ‘musical’ when you say theatre, which puts a lot of people put off.
    • Film is a cheap and easy way to get a 2 hour shot of entertainment, and requires far less effort (in people’s minds), than a trip to a theatre does, and this is what designers and producers have to find a way to overcome. Unfortunately there is no quick fix, as there is no sure fire way to win your audience on a single thing. If there was people would be queuing out the doors… The important thing is though, in my opinion, that they keep to their integrity and do not try and win over the filmic audience with cheap thrills, as it were. Theatre is often very thought provoking, and it would be a shame to lose such a thing just to pull in the punters.
    • Mishka English
  • 19. Part 2 – The Analysis Differences between theatre and filmic experiences on a night out, what ways do designers and producers need to reflect on
    • art 2 – The Analysis
    • Differences between theatre and filmic experiences on a night out, what ways do designers and producers need to reflect on these.
    • During experiences of film and theatre atmospheres are created within the environment for and by the audience, however these differ between the two media’s due to the space an audience member is in, the different types of people that tend to attend each and the way an individual views a film or production.
    • The theatre environment seems to create an intense personal atmosphere that is likely to vary from one audience member to the next. Depending on the production, theatre can be made to be interactive with an individual or group of people. In my experience theatre draws a person’s interests into a production so much that they have no choice but to pay attention, whereas in a cinema a viewer can feel a lot more relaxed and comfortable with their surroundings. I consider this to be a key reason as to why some do not enjoy the theatre experience; they do not like the hold that a production has over them.
    • When a group of people go to have a night out at the theatre they are inclined to dress up and make an effort to look ‘the part’ as there is still grandness, an almost upper-class characteristic that goes with the theatre. This is possibly due to the fact that it can be a reasonably expensive interest and does put people off.
    • Once an individual has found their seat in the auditorium, the view they have of the stage, acting and surrounding areas could be completely different to that of the person sat beside them, this could affect their experience due to the fact that they could see a lighting bar or had an extremely tall person sat in front of them restricting their view.
    • Of course the theatre is a live performance where anything could happen, each performance will differ slightly from night to night. Each person sat in the theatre will focus their vision and attention onto a different part of the stage or actor, creating a completely unique experience for every viewer.
    • Film being a recorded media a scene can be shot in as many takes as is necessary meaning that any glitches are edited out so that it is up to the directors expectations. This means that no matter what day or time someone goes to see that film no matter where they sit in the theatre they will view the exact same thing and because of camera angles and zooms the audience are forced to focus on a specific event or character, making the difference between peoples experience’s narrower.
    • Designers and producers need to take into consideration all of these facts when constructing a piece of theatre, a designer needs to think about the angles of seats in the theatres auditorium and sightlines these create. Careful positioning of scenic flats and props within a space could enable the majority of an audience to see the whole of the acting area and so the whole performance.
    • I producer must try to do their best to ensure nothing goes wrong in a performance and that everything runs smoothly but must also consider the effects if anything unrehearsed did occur and what would the procedures put in place if this were to happen. A producer must also think about the age range of an audience that are viewing the play/production, if the play contains adult content how can age restrictions be put into place and inforsed.
    • Kathryn Gray
  • 20. Part 2 – The Analysis Differences between theatre and filmic experiences on a night out, what ways do designers and producers need to reflect on these.
    • During experiences of film and theatre atmospheres are created within the environment for and by the audience, however these differ between the two media’s due to the space an audience member is in, the different types of people that tend to attend each and the way an individual views a film or production.
    • The theatre environment seems to create an intense personal atmosphere that is likely to vary from one audience member to the next. Depending on the production, theatre can be made to be interactive with an individual or group of people. In my experience theatre draws a person’s interests into a production so much that they have no choice but to pay attention, whereas in a cinema a viewer can feel a lot more relaxed and comfortable with their surroundings. I consider this to be a key reason as to why some do not enjoy the theatre experience; they do not like the hold that a production has over them.
    • When a group of people go to have a night out at the theatre they are inclined to dress up and make an effort to look ‘the part’ as there is still grandness, an almost upper-class characteristic that goes with the theatre. This is possibly due to the fact that it can be a reasonably expensive interest and does put people off.
    • Once an individual has found their seat in the auditorium, the view they have of the stage, acting and surrounding areas could be completely different to that of the person sat beside them, this could affect their experience due to the fact that they could see a lighting bar or had an extremely tall person sat in front of them restricting their view.
    • Of course the theatre is a live performance where anything could happen, each performance will differ slightly from night to night. Each person sat in the theatre will focus their vision and attention onto a different part of the stage or actor, creating a completely unique experience for every viewer.
    • Film being a recorded media a scene can be shot in as many takes as is necessary meaning that any glitches are edited out so that it is up to the directors expectations. This means that no matter what day or time someone goes to see that film no matter where they sit in the theatre they will view the exact same thing and because of camera angles and zooms the audience are forced to focus on a specific event or character, making the difference between peoples experience’s narrower.
    • Designers and producers need to take into consideration all of these facts when constructing a piece of theatre, a designer needs to think about the angles of seats in the theatres auditorium and sightlines these create. Careful positioning of scenic flats and props within a space could enable the majority of an audience to see the whole of the acting area and so the whole performance.
    • I producer must try to do their best to ensure nothing goes wrong in a performance and that everything runs smoothly but must also consider the effects if anything unrehearsed did occur and what would the procedures put in place if this were to happen. A producer must also think about the age range of an audience that are viewing the play/production, if the play contains adult content how can age restrictions be put into place and inforsed.
    • Michaella Smith