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Privacy

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How private are our details now? Does it matter? …

How private are our details now? Does it matter?
Presentation for 14 year olds asking them to think about witting and unwitting disclosure of personal details


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Transcript

  • 1. PRIVACY
  • 2. In pairs
    Work out a definition of the word
    PRIVACY
    that you think makes sense
    You’ve got about 7 minutes...
  • 3. The United Nations says
    Article 12 of the Universal Declaration
    No one shall be subjected to arbitrary interference with his privacy, family, home or correspondence, nor to attacks upon his honour and reputation Everyone has the right to the protection of the law against such interference or attacks.
    Article 16 of the Declaration of the Rights of the child
    No child shall be subjected to arbitrary or unlawful interference with his or her privacy, family, home or correspondence, nor to unlawful attacks on his or her honour and reputation.
  • 4. BUT these are QUALIFIED rights
    Interference with them is permissible only if what is done:
    has its basis in law, and
    is done to secure a permissible aim set out in the relevant Article, for example for the prevention of crime, or for the protection of public order or health, and
    is necessary in a democratic society, which means it must fulfil a pressing social need, pursue a legitimate aim and be proportionate to the aims being pursued
    A Guide to the Human Rights Act 1998: Third Edition
  • 5. So what would you want to keep private?
    Your..?
    Your..?
    Name?
    Address?
    Date of birth?
    Number of siblings?
    Favourite movies/food?
    School?
    Parents’ details?
    Allergies and GP details?
    Friends?
    Qualifications?
    Hobbies?
    Phone records?
    Text records?
    Criminal record?
    School history?
    Pets?
    Car details?
  • 6. Does it matter if any of this is NOT private any more?
    Your..?
    Your..?
    Name?
    Address?
    Date of birth?
    Number of siblings?
    Favourite movies/food?
    School?
    Parents’ details?
    Allergies and GP details?
    Friends?
    Qualifications?
    Hobbies?
    Phone records?
    Text records?
    Criminal record?
    School history?
    Pets?
    Car details?
  • 7. WHY?
    In pairs, see if you can come up with reasons for your answer – use the Internet to find examples to support your view for extra credit...
    You’ve got about 10minutes...
  • 8. Privacy leaks...
    Facebook
    YouTube
    Twitter
    Experion
    CCTV
    Loyalty cards
    Cookies
    Databases – NHS, National Identity Card
  • 9. Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act
    Allows the police, intelligence services, HM Revenue and Customs (and several hundred more public bodies, including local authorities and a wide range of regulators) to demand telephone, internet and postal service providers to hand over detailed communications records for individual users. This can include name and address, phone calls made and received, source and destination of emails, internet browsing information and mobile phone positioning data that records user's location. These powers are self-authorised by the body concerned, with no external or judicial oversight.
  • 10. Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act
    Enables the government to demand that someone hands over keys to protected information; and makes it a criminal offence to refuse to supply actual encrypted traffic or refuse to disclose an encryption key.
    Enables the government to force internet service providers to fit equipment to facilitate surveillance.
    Allows the government to demand an ISP provider provide secret access to a customer's communication.
    Makes provisions to establish an oversight regime, creates an investigatory powers tribunal and appoints three commissioners.
  • 11. So by what rules should we live?
    In fours...
    Suggest the way we should work on the Internet, on our phones...
    What private things should we protect, or should we just be careful to have nothing to hide?
    You’ve got about 10minutes...

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