U.S. Facts

217 views

Published on

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
217
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
3
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
1
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

U.S. Facts

  1. 1. List of Articles and its Links:     “GM is reluctant to part with one of its most profitable operations,” according to two people briefed on the discussions.  GM sold 1.3m cars in Latin America last year, and is the second‐largest carmaker in Brazil. “Latin America is the rub,” said  one of these people, who requested anonymity because of the sensitivity of the deal. “GM is not going to roll over and  just hand it over.” Financial Times, May 14th. For full article click on this link: http://www.ft.com/cms/s/0/363089c2‐3fe7‐11de‐9ced‐ 00144feabdc0.html?nclick_check=1        Jeremy Grantham chairman and co‐founder of GMO: “Well, Brazil, of course, is much improved from the way it used to  be and has a nice position in natural resources. And on a very long horizon, I like its style. I'm not making a  recommendation based on today's price. Indeed, I don't know today's price, they move so fast.” Interviewed by Steve  Forbes on 01.26.09. For full article click on this link: http://www.forbes.com/2009/01/23/intelligent‐investing‐grantham‐ transcriptJan26.html        Wall Street Journal: John Johnson Chief Executive of CHS Inc. was muddling along in  the U.S. Then, he hatched an idea that amounted to heresy in a company owned by  Americans: “CHS is going outside of the U.S.” CHS once a loose collection of co‐ operative in the U.S. has emerged as a new powerhouse. CHS returned $345 million  in cash, more than five times the $61 million of five years earlier.     Picture: Soybean warehouse used by CHS in Vitória, Brazil.   For full article click on this link: http://www.mbrservices.com/cnews/downloads/WSJ_July08.pdf        “Brazil have found a North Sea”  Tony Hayward, BP’s chief executive, believe the waters off Brazil’s south‐eastern coast (between Vitória and Santos) hold  oil reserves as big and important as those discovered in the North Sea in the 1970s. An executive from a competing oil  company with operations in Latin America and the North Sea said: “Brazil have found a North Sea”. Financial Times, Feb.  nd 2  2009 insert. For full article click on the link below. For full article click on this link: http://www.ft.com/cms/s/0/68b4452a‐f14d‐ 11dd‐8790‐0000779fd2ac.html        The Next Trillion Dollar Club? Brazil!  Peterson Institute for International Economics. For full article click on this  link: http://www.petersoninstitute.org/publications/papers/williamson0908.pdf        I’ve Said it Before and I’ll Say it Again; In Brazil you Pick a State: Change you mind set, the political party systems  affiliation do not apply or works in Brazil and its government like in the U.S.    Here is an Example: Straits Times, July 15, 2009, Japan lends São Paulo and Santa Catarina, two Brazilian’s states, $331  million dollars. The loan's duration is 25 years with interest of 1.2 per cent a year. It comes with 'no strings' attached,  meaning no requirement that Brazil use Japanese equipment in the projects. Why are the Japanese lending directly to  the states and doing business this way? If you don’t know the answer, you shouldn’t be doing business in Brazil… yet!  For full article click on this link: http://www.straitstimes.com/Breaking%2BNews/Tech%2Band%2BScience/Story/STIStory_403614.html             
  2. 2. A New World Disorder  McKinsey & Company, March 2009  Political‐risk consultant Ian Bremmer of Eurasia Group discusses how the downturn is reshaping globalization.    “If the United States doesn’t have the same level of access to China’s markets, if the US doesn’t have the same level of  access  to  Chinese  money  surpluses—in  terms  of  purchasing  US  Treasuries—the  US  has  a  serious  problem…  Now,  Chinese citizens are angry about the downturn—but they’re not blaming Beijing, they’re blaming the West. And I think  the  Chinese  government  is  likely  to  make  use  of  that.  We  already  saw  it  recently  with  Chinese  leaders  definitively  saying that the American political model is not for them. I don’t think those two things are a coincidence. And so we’re  definitely  going  to  see  a  more  difficult  environment  for  us  to  make  money  out  of  China.  Maybe  a  more  difficult  environment for us to secure Chinese lending for American treasuries. But I think China, itself, will be resilient”    “Saudi Arabia, with only 25 million people, with very strong popularity of their king, Abdullah; with a succession model  that looks much more stable and able to get through than a lot of people had feared before. [The country is] starting to  unlock the untapped potential of women as employees within their country—50 percent of potential productivity that  no  one’s  ever  bothered  with.  Recently,  now,  they’re  starting  to.  Over  50  percent  of  incoming  university  students  in  Saudi Arabia are women—one of the extraordinary stories there. And the fact that they are starting to look to really  diversify their economy. I think the Gulf, in general, taking a longer‐term view, will be able to get through this crisis  relatively well.’    “And  then  I’d  say  Brazil.  Brazil’s  changed.  The  political  spectrum  has  really  consolidated  around  the  center.  They’ve  built a middle class that supports growth, that supports the creation of entrepreneurship in Brazil. They also are the  Saudi Arabia of biofuels, and they have some of the world’s largest untapped oil reserves just to boot, off shore. Put all  that together, Brazil looks very strong to me. And so, in this incredibly volatile environment, we do need to recognize  there  are  some  countries  out  there  that  are  clearly  going  to  outperform.  And  there  are  places  that  will  be  very  attractive.” For full article click on this link: http://www.mckinseyquarterly.com/A_new_world_disorder_2339        Behind ‐ ‐ the building of the next bubble ‐ ‐ Goldman Sachs’ Second Quarter Profit  Economic Policy Institute, 07‐15‐09    “Shrewd business decisions by Goldman traders (along with a reduced field of competitors) were undoubtedly responsible  for a good share of the profits being crowed about by the firm this week. Notably, the firm cashed in on profit margins for  commodity and foreign exchange trading.” For full article click on this  link: http://www.epi.org/analysis_and_opinion/entry/behind_goldman_sachs_second_quarter_profit/        Why Venturing Abroad Still Makes Sense for Fund Investors February 2, 2009, Wall Street Journal    Simon Hallett, lead portfolio manager of the Harding Loevner International Equity fund, backed away from emerging  markets in 2006; but now he's re‐establishing positions in these markets, “emerging markets expects to have a  substantial overweighting by the end of this year … One appealing country is Brazil, which has a well‐managed economy  and is investing in infrastructure and education.”    “It's easy to criticize foreign investing these days. Though the U.S. was the epicenter of the global credit crisis and  market meltdown”… small companies in emerging markets are bargains. Ron Florance, director of asset allocation and  strategy at Wells Fargo Private Bank, recommending that clients overweight emerging‐market holdings. The current  valuations and demographics in emerging markets are compelling, he says, because there is an emerging middle class and  improving education and worker productivity. For full article click on this link:  http://online.wsj.com/article/SB123308918983621063.html         
  3. 3. My case why investing in U.S. bonds, U.S. treasuries, and U.S Real Estate is the most unattractive  —to put it mildly— Investment you can own!    • Did you bother to look at the return after subtracting the costs of borrowing?  • Do you think that the U.S. is the only nation that needs to borrow —$46 cents on the dollar on 09— heavily?  • Will you know how much your Dollar —I mean, your paycheck and investments— will be worth in the future?      You don’t know, right? Not easy questions to answer? Well, that case, let’s have Warren take a shot at it for us!      Warren Buffett:    On the Dollar:  “Canada’s currency is likely to outperform the U.S. dollar in coming years. I bought a couple billion dollars worth of  Canadian currency some time ago, and now I wished I had bought more.”  Mr. Buffett continues his bearish stance on  the U.S. dollar and continues to hold the Brazilian real.    He said he was “happy to invest in overseas companies, because currencies in those countries are not likely to decrease  to the same extent as the U.S. dollar. The federal government appears likely to follow policies that will make the dollar  even weaker.” Mr. Buffett stated that he does not feel a need to hedge on other currencies.    On the Recession:  He confirmed his view that the U.S. is in fact in recession. If people find their financial situation is worse than it was six  months ago, his advice is to “remain calm.” He added that investors should think for themselves and be detached from  the crowd. Berkshire Hathaway plans to continue to insure municipal bonds issues, but if premiums are too low, it won’t  accept the coverage. Mr. Munger said that much of the present trouble in the financial markets is the result of “stupidity  and over‐reaching” by people who ran the institutions.    On Mortgages:  Both Mr. Buffett and Mr. Munger agreed that home buyers that were misled on mortgages are facing a crisis. Mortgage  should be provided a one‐page document that is headlined “WARNING” in red and the industry’s continuing write‐downs  due to bad debt are not over by a long shot. For full article click on this link: http://seekingalpha.com/article/76061‐ warren‐buffett‐on‐the‐dollar‐the‐recession‐subprime‐and‐bear‐stearns        Why Venturing Abroad Still Makes Sense for Fund Investors February 2, 2009, Wall Street Journal    Simon Hallett, lead portfolio manager of the Harding Loevner International Equity fund, backed away from emerging  markets in 2006; but now he's re‐establishing positions in these markets, “emerging markets expects to have a  substantial overweighting by the end of this year … One appealing country is Brazil, which has a well‐managed  economy and is investing in infrastructure and education.”    “It's easy to criticize foreign investing these days. Though the U.S. was the epicenter of the global credit crisis and  market meltdown, overseas markets were generally hit harder than domestic … everybody sells everything," says Alec  Young, international equity strategist for Standard & Poor's Equity Research. “Commodity‐sensitive markets like Latin  America are starting to look appealing. A commodity rally would likely boost Latin American currencies against the  dollar, adding extra juice for U.S. investors. We'd rather play markets that benefit from stability in commodity prices  versus markets dependent on an end to the global credit crunch … and they are offering fatter dividend yields than U.S.  shares."    Small companies in emerging markets are bargains. Ron Florance, director of asset allocation and strategy at Wells Fargo.   For full article click on this link: http://online.wsj.com/article/SB123308918983621063.html 

×