Nurturing Young Writers

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Informed by the work of the WNY Young Writers' Studio, Ruth Culham, Theresa Gray, Steve Peha, and Communities for Learning: Leading Lasting Change, this powerpoint was shared with teachers at Enterprise Charter School in August of 2012.

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  • Warm Up With Quotes
  • Studio is a Community…how and why it came to be. My other experiences, including classroom and coaching.
  • This is what I hope to do today—share my stories and invite you to share yours, so connections are created. These two days are a gift—I hope you can leave with valuable understandings relative to….framework, how you can est. a writing community in your classroom, how a curricula can take shape and unfold, and how you can fall in love with writing yourself and with teaching even more
  • Issues aren’t with doing, but with being. Dispositions.
  • Nurturing Young Writers

    1. 1. Nurturing Young Writers in Every Content Area: Dispositions, Process, and The Six Traits Angela Stockman WNY Education Associates stockmanangela@gmail.com
    2. 2. WELCOME! Growing the GoodWhat do you currently do tosupport young writers well? Consider: Curriculum Instruction Assessment Management
    3. 3. Photo by Silvia Tolisano
    4. 4. TODAY’S AGENDA• Defining our guiding questions Please peruse today’s agenda. about writing instruction• Understanding and nurturing a writer’s dispositions What needs, questions, or concerns emerge?• Strategies for supporting the writing process and craft across the curriculum How can I make this day more• Connecting dispositions, process, meaningful for you? and craft: planning a year, planning a unit• Approaching assessment• Quality feedback• Rethinking rubrics
    5. 5. We Connect Through Our Stories
    6. 6. We All Need to Leave Our Mark on the World http://tinyurl.com/27u6wa8
    7. 7. What Will Yours Be? http://tinyurl.com/28xbnyz
    8. 8. What is the differencebetween real writing and….
    9. 9. functional writing? http://www.flickr.com/photos/sean002/2510540027/
    10. 10. WHERE DO YOU INVESTTHE MOSTENERGY?
    11. 11. THE MOST IMPORTANT WRITINGINSTRUMENT TO PUT IN THEIR HANDS
    12. 12. BALANCE BUILDS BETTER WRITERSBeing vs. Doing
    13. 13. What I’m learning about being a good writer: WE ACT AND WRITE WITH COURAGE
    14. 14. WE SEEK UNDERSTANDING BEFORE DOING
    15. 15. WE PERSEVERE
    16. 16. WE COLLABORATE
    17. 17. WE SHARE OUR EXPERTISE
    18. 18. WE GIVE OF OURSELVESAND ACT WITH KINDNESS
    19. 19. WE REFLECT ON WHERE WE’VE BEEN, WHERE WE ARE GOING, AND HOW WE PLAN TO GET THERE
    20. 20. WE KNOW THAT WRITINGIS OFTEN A SLOW PROCESS
    21. 21. WE TRY TO DEVELOP BETTER AND BETTER AND BETTER STRATEGIES FOR IMPROVING OUR OWN WORK AND HELPING OTHERS
    22. 22. WE ARE ALL WRITERS AND LEARNERS
    23. 23. AND ALL OF US MUST TEACH.
    24. 24. “Real Writers” and “Real Writing”Have Certain Dispositions in Common.... http://www.flickr.com/photos/jefield/1119389/
    25. 25. http://www.flickr.com/photos/whatmegsaid/3172360305/
    26. 26. UNDERSTANDING http://www.flickr.com/photos/notsogoodphotography/770557316/
    27. 27. R E F L E C T I O Nhttp://www.flickr.com/photos/tonythemisfit/3223459074/
    28. 28. EXPERTISEhttp://farm4.static.flickr.com/3461/3196112134_aa09fbfefa.jpg?v=0
    29. 29. They are…. CONNECTEDCOLLABORATIVE ENGAGED http://www.flickr.com/photos/stuartpilbrow/3102888961/
    30. 30. Where Do Process and Craft Fit In?Envisioning a Year of Writing Together •Courage and Initiative Community Fellows Strive •Understanding to Embody Certain •Perseverance •Reflection Dispositions •Expertise •Cooperation and Collaboration •Prewriting Which Support the •Drafting •Peer-Review Writers Process •Editing •Revising •Publishing • Compelling Ideas Allowing for the Development of • Engaging Voice • Effective Word Choice Writers Craft • Clear Organization • Fluent Sentences • Proper Use of Conventions
    31. 31. Writing is a Recursive Process IDEAS PrewritingORGANIZATION Drafting Peer VOICE Review WORD CHOICE SENTENCE FLUENCY CONVENTIONS Revision Editing Publishing PRESENTATION CONNECTION/REFLECTION EVOLUTION
    32. 32. THE WRITING PROCESS Prewriting Drafting Peer-Review Editing Revision (throughout) PublicationWriting is a Process Which parts of the process show up most in your classroom? Least? Why?
    33. 33. PREWRITING What does this look like?Strategies for Support: Problems Labs Tasks to Reflect On Research Questions Writing Prompts Artifacts Pictures Music Video Movement Equations RAFTS Conversation Web Tools
    34. 34. Traits to Focus on During Pre-Writing: IDEAS ORGANIZATION
    35. 35. IDEAS• Invite or inspire pre-writing activities.• Come from our experiences, our connections, and our previous understandings.• May be generated from problems to solve, dilemmas to consider, artifacts, photographs, movement, music, conversation, guided brainstorming and more…..• Require good writers to select appropriate MODES and to define their PURPOSES.• Move readers from general to more refined topics.• Inspire careful observation.• Require independent use of higher level thought.• Require writers to use facts, evidence, and/or details in order to support
    36. 36. Considering MODES and PURPOSECOMMON TEXT TYPES (MODES) COMMON PURPOSES FOR WRITING Narrative Text To Persuade Expository/ Informational Text To Describe Procedural Text To Inform Poetic To Think Functional To Connect/Collaborate Hybrid To Build Collective Intelligence
    37. 37. What is Digital Writing?• When we take our writing digital, we share ANY of those forms online. Typically, they blend when we do so.• This requires us to learn how to connect them to the ideas and work that others have shared.• How does happen? – Linking – Curation – Social Networking and Social Learning• Why is this important? – Collective Intelligence
    38. 38. How Do We Help Writers Generate Their OWN Innovative Ideas? #1 By Helping Them Establish AND Maintain a Writing Territories ListStrategies to Try:• Loop and Zoom• Exploring the Estate• Listing• What Do You Think? Why Do You Think That?• What Did You Write? Why Did You Write That?
    39. 39. How can we intervene when writers struggle togenerate their own ideas?Directed Writing vs. Choice The Power of Reflection Creating a Container Inquiry-Style Writing
    40. 40. Organization “Organization is what you do before you do something so that when you do it it’s not all mixed up.”http://blog.wired.com/geekdad/books/index.html Winnie the Pooh
    41. 41. Organization• Requires that writers develop an INVITING lead for that provokes questioning and curiosity.• Inspires a body of work that attends to these questions and curiosities in a logical manner.• Purposeful sequencing is critical.• Relies upon smooth transitions and the articulation of turning points and resolutions.• Requires a conclusion that satisfies the questions and curiosities provoked by the lead and may inspire new ones. It does not, however, introduce new information.
    42. 42. ORGANIZATIONWHAT IT IS…. HOW WE SUPPORT IT…A lead that “hooks” reader and Models and mentor texts provokes questions. Consuming and “Mapping” TextA core that provides details in a logical manner and Story boards transitions between them smoothly. Graphic organizersAn ending that satisfies the questions raised within the work.
    43. 43. Traits to Focus On As We DraftIDEASORGANIZATIONVOICE
    44. 44. VOICE• The “sound” of the writer or the speaker.• Tone that is appropriate to the task.• Commitment to the piece—involvement.• Attention to the topic.
    45. 45. Voice• Requires that writers shift the way they speak in response to MODE and PURPOSE.• Invites diversity and complexity.• Built when students take RISKS.• Thrives in a comfortable atmosphere.• Suffers when we overemphasize formulaic processes or models.
    46. 46. Exploringmentor texts leads endingsin-betweens
    47. 47. Writers Need STRATEGIES That Help Them CRAFT Voice• Hearing Voices• Give-Aways:• Add-Ons• Messing With Sentences
    48. 48. “The race in writing is not to the swift, but to the original.” ----William ZinsserWORD CHOICE
    49. 49. Word Choice• Original words• Precise words• Engaging words• Varied words• Attention to dialect and formality
    50. 50. GIVE THEM WORDS!• Sentence Frames• Smart Words• Word Walls• Playing with Precision
    51. 51. Post-It Poetry
    52. 52. Sentence fluency• Fluent sentences appeal to the ear and the eye.• They vary in length and structure.• They convey character, emotion, and reveal voice.• Rhythm, rhyme, and repetition of vowel and consonant sounds effect fluency.
    53. 53. Beyond Peer-Conferencing: Peer Review Processes Modeling With Fishbowl Assessment InterventionCoaching With Push/Pause
    54. 54. Traits to Focus On During Peer-ReviewIDEASVOICEORGANIZATIONWORD CHOICESENTENCE FLUENCY
    55. 55. EDITINGHow are YOU strong as an editor?Differentiating the peer-editing process
    56. 56. Traits to Focus On As We Edit IDEAS VOICE ORGANIZATION WORD CHOICE SENTENCE FLUENCY CONVENTIONS
    57. 57. CONVENTIONS:THE LAST CONVERSATION • Attending to conventions happens at the END of the writing process. • Effective writers understand why editing is necessary. Strong writers know that editing isn’t merely about “fixing up” writing. • Edits are intentional, effective, and do not strip the work of voice, ideas, or fluency. They BUILD it.
    58. 58. PUBLISHING What doesthis mean to you? How is the definition shifting? Whatopportunitiesare available?
    59. 59. Approaching Assessment
    60. 60. What Does EffectiveAssessment of Writing Look Like? What Does it Feel Like? What Makes for Adequate Practice? What Makes for Suitable Practice?
    61. 61. Providing Quality Feedback: Criteria and a Protocol
    62. 62. Rethinking RubricsPopular Practice vs. Promising Practice
    63. 63. Let’s PlayUse the materials provided to explore and design instructional approaches that will meet the needs of your students. Be prepared to share your work during peer-review, gather feedback from your colleagues, and share your growing expertise with others.
    64. 64. ReferencesCulham, Ruth. 6 + 1 Traits of Writing: The Complete Guide, Grades 3 and Up. New York: Scholastic, 2003.Gray, Theresa (2006). Slideshare. Writing Frameworks. Retrieved January 21, 2009 from: http://www.slideshare.net/TGray/writing-frameworksMartin-Kniep, Giselle O. Communities That Lead, Learn, and Last: Building and Sustaining Educational Expertise. California: Jossey-Bass, 2008.National Board for Professional Teacher Standards. “What Teachers Should Know and Be Able to Do: The Five Core Propositions.” Retrieved Aug. 21, 2008 from http://www.nbpts.org/the_standards/the_five_core_propositionsPeha, Steve. “Writing Across the Content Areas.” Retrieved August 1, 2012 from http://ttms.org/Stockman, Angela (2008-Present). WNY Young Writers’ Studio. Presented at Daemen College, Amherst, NY and the Kenan Center, Lockport, NY.Unless otherwise noted, all photographs were taken by Angela Stockman, who was given permission to use them by the subject and parents.

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