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HUMINT Threat MEXICO
HUMINT Threat MEXICO
HUMINT Threat MEXICO
HUMINT Threat MEXICO
HUMINT Threat MEXICO
HUMINT Threat MEXICO
HUMINT Threat MEXICO
HUMINT Threat MEXICO
HUMINT Threat MEXICO
HUMINT Threat MEXICO
HUMINT Threat MEXICO
HUMINT Threat MEXICO
HUMINT Threat MEXICO
HUMINT Threat MEXICO
HUMINT Threat MEXICO
HUMINT Threat MEXICO
HUMINT Threat MEXICO
HUMINT Threat MEXICO
HUMINT Threat MEXICO
HUMINT Threat MEXICO
HUMINT Threat MEXICO
HUMINT Threat MEXICO
HUMINT Threat MEXICO
HUMINT Threat MEXICO
HUMINT Threat MEXICO
HUMINT Threat MEXICO
HUMINT Threat MEXICO
HUMINT Threat MEXICO
HUMINT Threat MEXICO
HUMINT Threat MEXICO
HUMINT Threat MEXICO
HUMINT Threat MEXICO
HUMINT Threat MEXICO
HUMINT Threat MEXICO
HUMINT Threat MEXICO
HUMINT Threat MEXICO
HUMINT Threat MEXICO
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HUMINT Threat MEXICO

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  • 1. Enabling Learning Objectives  Tasks: Present a Threat Brief on Mexico.  Conditions: Given student handouts, FM 2-22.3, AR 381-172, AR 525-13, AR 381-20 and AR 381-10.  Standards: Apply lessons learned to the current Threat environment and provide recommendation to a Commander on how to accomplish the HUMINT mission and mitigate the threat. UNCLASSIFIED
  • 2. Administrative Data Safety Requirements: None Risk Assessment Level: Low Environment Considerations: None Evaluations: Presentation UNCLASSIFIED
  • 3. UNCLASSIFIED
  • 4. Mexico States UNCLASSIFIED
  • 5. Population UNCLASSIFIED
  • 6. Religion Roman Catholics: 82.7%, 97% percent of whom attend church services weekly Protestantism: About 9% of the population Seventh-day Adventist: About 488,946 people Jehovah's Witnesses: 1.1% Nonreligious: 3.1% and growing annually by an estimated 5.2% Mexico City Metropolitan Cathedral Buddhism: 108,701 Buddhists are counted in Mexico. Also one of six Tibet Houses in the world - Casa Tibet México - is located in Mexico City. Islam: Is present, but mainly practiced by members of the Arab, Turkish, and other expatriate communities who have migrated to Mexico and a small number of the indigenous population in Chiapas that practices Islam UNCLASSIFIED
  • 7. EconomicsMexico is the 13th largest in the world and the 11th by purchasing power parity 90% of Mexican trade is under Free Trade Agreements (FTAs) with more than 40 countries United States and Canada accounted for almost 90% of its exports and 55% of its imports 17.6% of Mexico's population lived in extreme poverty, while 21% lived in moderated poverty. 13.7% total poverty Electronics – Mexico is the top producer of TV and smartphones in the world Mexico is the 6th largest oil producer in the world 3,700,00 barrels a day Tourism - 8th most visited country in the world Mexicans living abroad (mainly in the USA) send an estimated $18 billion home to their families annually UNCLASSIFIED
  • 8. Political The politics of Mexico take place in a framework of a federal presidential prepresentative democratic republic government is based on a congressional system, whereby the president is both the head of state and government. The government is divided into three branches: executive, legislative and judicial. Elected by popular vote for one time 6 year term UNCLASSIFIED
  • 9. Legal SystemNapoleonic Law Defendant presumed guilty, until proven innocent If lucky, prosecutor prepares case Both cases submitted to a judgeSupreme Court More than 85% of those charged with a crime are sentenced “Crooked cops regularly solve cases by grabbing the first person they find, often along with a cooked-up story from someone claiming to be an eyewitness. Prosecutors and judges play along, eager to calm a growing public outcry over high crime rates and rising violence from Mexico's war on illicit drug gangs.” 12% of crimes are reported to the police via writing, no jury or oral testimony Decision rendered on the documentation presented y prosecution and defense No death penalty exists in Mexico (like most Latin American countries) UNCLASSIFIED
  • 10. Law EnforcementState Police Each of the country's thirty-one states maintain both preventive and judicial police called the State Judicial Police. State police are under the direction of the state's governor. The distinction between crimes investigated by State and Federal Judicial Police is not always clear. Most offenses come under the state authorities. Drug dealing, crimes against the government, and offenses involving several jurisdictions are the responsibility of the federal police. The state-level preventive police forces are together perhaps 90,000-strong, and the state-level judicial police perhaps 25,000-strong. Municipalities Some of the municipalities of Mexico havve their own preventive and municipal police forces, which are responsible for handling minor civil disturbances and traffic infractions. Of the 2,395 municipalities, 335 have no police forces. However, some of the municipal forces are large and important. Attack at a police station in the town of Los Ramones. More than a 1,000 rounds and launched 6 grenades at the building. Arrest of a drug smuggler in Juarez UNCLASSIFIED
  • 11. Law Enforcement: Policía Federal Preventiva Employees 40,000+ officers and staff (2009) Annual budget $34.6 Billion USD (2010) Mission: Compliance with legal framework to combat organized crime and drugs. The establishment of the National System of Public Security. The evaluation and adjustment of the strategy for drug control in Mexico and as it relateds to the USA. Most police are paid $340 monthly Training: 90 days total. 60 w/their unit and 30 w/USA Policia Federal patrol through Tijuana Problem: CORRUPTION UNCLASSIFIED
  • 12. Law Enforement: Special CENAPI, National Center for Information, Analysis and Planning in order to Fight Crime. Coordinates with other federal, state and municipal government agencies. Clearinghouse for the data gathered by the various entities in the fight against organized crime. Focus primarly on narcotics. SIEDO, Subprocuraduría de Investigación Especializada en Delincuencia Organizada (Assistant Attorney General's Office for Special Investigations on Organized Crime). Total of 291 agents. Specialized investigation unit, one year of training. AFI, Agencia Federal de Investigación, was a federal agency that existed to fight corruption and organized crime, through an executive order by President. 1/5 of its officers were soon under investigation for criminal activity. Because of corruption, the unit was dismanteled in May 2009 UNCLASSIFIED
  • 13. Military In 2006, 45,000 troops of the Mexican Army were deployed to fight drug cartels with the number rising to 50,000 by October 2010 Army -active duty force of 192,000 Navy – 56,000 personnel, over 189 ships, and 130 aircraft Air Force -11,770 personnel aprox. 363 aircraft Guillermo Galván Galván, a Mexican general, is the Secetary of National Defense Problem: POWER UNCLASSIFIED
  • 14. Drug Cartels UNCLASSIFIED
  • 15. Drug Cartels: Origin The birth of all Mexican drug cartels are traced to former Mexican Judicial Federal Police agent Miguel Angel Felix Gallardo “The Godfather”, who in the 1980s controlled all illegal drug trade in Mexico and the corridors across the Mexico-USA border. He started off by smuggling marijuana and opium into the USA and was the first Mexican drug capo to link up with Colombias cocain cartels in the 1980s. Through his connections, Félix Gallardo became the point man for the Medellin cartel, which was run by Pabol Escobar. Félix Gallardo was arrested on 8 April 1989. Other arrests, greed, and desire for more power stimulated conflicts between the newly formed and now independent cartels. There were no cartels at that time in Mexico UNCLASSIFIED
  • 16. Drug Cartels: The Seven UNCLASSIFIED
  • 17. Drug Cartels: Beltrán-Leyva Cartel The Beltrán-Leyva Cartel is a Mexican drug cartel and organized crime syndicate founded by the four Beltrán Leyva brothers: Marcos Arturo, Carlos, Alfredo, and Hector. The cartel is responsible for cocain transportation and wholesaling, marijuana production and wholesaling, and heroin production and wholesaling, controls numerous drug trafficking corridors, and engages in human trafficing, money Laundering, extortion, kidnapping, murder, and gun running. They were Formerly Aligned with the Sinaloa Cartel, but are now allies of Los Zetas. UNCLASSIFIED
  • 18. Drug Cartels: Sinaloa Cartel The Sinaloa Cartel began to contest the Gulf Cartel’s domination of the coveted southwest Texas corridor following the arrest of Gulf Cartel Leader Osiel Cardenas in March 2003. The "Federation" was the result of a 2006 accord between several groups located in the Pacific state of Sinaloa. The cartel is led by Joaquin “El Chapo” Guzman, Mexico's most-wanted drug trafficker and whose estimated net worth of US $1 billion makes him the 701st richest man in the world, according to Forbes Magazine. May 2010, numerous reports by Mexican and US media claimed that Sinaloa had infiltrated the Mexican federal government and military, and colluded with it to destroy the other cartels. UNCLASSIFIED
  • 19. Drug Cartels: Juarez Cartel Juarez Cartel controls one of the primary transportation routes for billions of Dollars worth of illegal drug shipments annually entering the United States from Mexico. Since 2007, the Juarez Cartel has been locked in a vicious Battle with its former partner, The Sinaloa Cartel, for control of Ciudad Juarez. This has resulted in Juarez being the deadliest city in Mexico. La Linea is a group pf Mexican drug traffickers and corrupt Juarez and Chihuahua state police officers who work as the armed wing of the Juarez Cartel. Vincente Carrillo Fuentes heads the Juarez Cartel. known to decapitate their rivals and mutilate their corpses and dump them in public to instill fear UNCLASSIFIED
  • 20. Corruption Edelmiro Cavazos, mayor of Santiagot Its estimated that gangsters and cartels pass out some $100 million each month to local and state cops on the take 10% of police force is under payroll of drug cartel 25% of special unit officers are under payroll of drug cartel 30% of government employees are under payroll of drug cartel Bribery: 14% of Mexican income is spent bribing government official’s Police recycles Kickbacks Security Services Fear Police officer taking a bribe from an American not to arrest him Friends and family silence a woman whos husband was murdered from speaking out in court UNCLASSIFIED
  • 21. Juarez American murder victim 1,321,004 inhabitants About 10,670 businesses – 40% of the total – have shut since 2007 7500 federal troops and police patrol through Juarez against the drug cartels Juárez's murder rate was the highest reported in the world, exceeding the holders of the second and third highest rates by more than 25% In 2010, the number of homicides in the city reached 3,075, Tax payers in El Paso spent over $1 million in 2009 for shooting victims Juarez is the 4th largest in Mexico Largest international trade center for US/Mexico Mother of a murder victim Vehicle inspection UNCLASSIFIED
  • 22. Juarez UNCLASSIFIED
  • 23. Juarez UNCLASSIFIED
  • 24. Juarez UNCLASSIFIED
  • 25. Juarez UNCLASSIFIED
  • 26. Juarez UNCLASSIFIED
  • 27. If........................Then If Mexico is unsuccessful at eliminated the drug cartels and they continue to operate in Juarez... The United States will invest more funding and training towards the war on drugs. More Soldiers will be allocated in the support of border operations, better fencing will be built, and stricter policy will be developed. The America people, especially those along the border will demand actions be taken to stop the murders from taking place along the border and stop the drugs from coming in. If Mexico is able to eliminate the drug cartels operating in Juarez... The immediate economy will take a plunge until it is able to reestablish itself in a normal operating environment. The amount of crime will raise as people try to the higher order of operating and those who were involved in drug cartel are rounded up. The need for honest police will be a high priority. UNCLASSIFIED
  • 28. HUMINT: TASK FORCE DEBRIEFING MISSION Warrant Office SFC SSG SSG SGT Spanish 3/3 Spanish 3/3 Spanish 3/3 Spanish 3/3 Spanish 3/3 ASOC ASOC ASOC ASOC ASOC Combat pistol course Combat pistol course Combat pistol course Combat pistol course Combat pistol course Defensive driving Defensive driving Defensive driving Defensive driving Defensive driving Warrant Office SSG SSG SGT SGT No Language Requ. Spanish 3/3 Spanish 3/3 Spanish 3/3 Spanish 3/3 DSDC DSDC DSDC DSDC DSDC Combat pistol course Combat pistol course Combat pistol course Combat pistol course Combat pistol course Defensive driving Defensive driving Defensive driving Defensive driving Defensive driving SOURCE MISSION Warrant Office SFC SSG SSG SGT Spanish 3/3 Spanish 3/3 Spanish 3/3 Spanish 3/3 Spanish 3/3 SOC SOC SOC SOC SOC Combat pistol course Combat pistol course Combat pistol course Combat pistol course Combat pistol course Defensive driving Defensive driving Defensive driving Defensive driving Defensive driving COLLECTION MISSION UNCLASSIFIED
  • 29. HUMINT: TASK FORCE DEBRIEFING MISSION UNCLASSIFIED
  • 30. HUMINT: TASK FORCE SOURCE MISSION UNCLASSIFIED
  • 31. HUMINT: TASK FORCE COLLECTION MISSION UNCLASSIFIED
  • 32. Solutions UNCLASSIFIED Remove the cartels and protect the citizens of Mexico from other outside Influences coming into the area. Maintain a secure environment free from corruption. Americans stop buying drugs and the drug dealers will have no job. Biggest step in hurting the business operations of Mexican cartels would be simply to legalize their main product: marijuana.
  • 33. 2nd ...3rd Order Effects Solution 2nd 3rd Cartels are removed from Mexico – Tourism pro 2005 356,000 vehicle passengers daily 2009 242,000 vehicle passengers daily After cartels removed: Back up to 356,000 or more 2005 drop 13.2% 2009 drop 19.7% Raise back up to normal standards of American crossing for business, family, and pleasure Cartels are removed from Mexico – Tourism con Other drug cartels move into the area to claim territory Murders, assassinations, and attacks increase as retaliation Cartels removed/corruption prevented – business pro Unemployment 5.5% in 2008 8.2% in 2009 9.3% in 2010 Decrease in unemployment rates People will start to fight back and protect what is theirs Cartels removed/corruption prevented – business pro 2009 210,000 people left, 32,700 homes abandoned 2010 116,000 houses abandoned, 270,000 people left People will return and claim what is theirs The gap dividing the city of Juarez will disappear Cartels removed/corruption prevented – business con People will not return, settled into new lives else where. Squatters wont turn over property New forms of corruption and methods developed UNCLASSIFIED
  • 34. 2nd ...3rd Order Effects Solution 2nd 3rd Cartels are removed from Mexico – Economic pro People will come across the border to shop and spend money, increasing the economy. More jobs, more money. Trade will increase Cartels are removed from Mexico – Economic con Economy will fall. 63% comes from drug business Drug loans will cease, preventing people from “starting up” Corruption and bribery eliminated at government level Cost of government projects will decrease and allow for more to be done Better product for cost due to competition UNCLASSIFIED
  • 35. HUMINT Requirements 1. How many members does the Juarez Cartel have? 2. What key governmental employees are on the Juarez Cartel payroll? 3. What police officers are on the Juarez Cartel payroll? 4. When do key members of the Juarez Cartel meet? 5. When are shipments made to the USA? 6. Routes of smuggling? 7. Vehicles used by the Juarez Cartel? 8. Money house locations? 9. Drug house locations? 10. Phone numbers of key members? 11. Detailed descriptions of key members? 12. SPOT information about assassinations? 13. Who does the Juarez Cartel feel most threatened by and why? 14. Organization structure? 15. When and how are shipments made to the cartel? UNCLASSIFIED
  • 36. PPolitical MMilitary/ Security EEconomic SSocial IInfrastructure IInformation AAreas Party affiliated areas, Cartel’s Politically influenced areas PGR and SEDENA bases, Known Cartel locations and routes Farming areas, financial institutions, Air Travel Services smuggling routes, locations of illicit exchange, mining area Traditional gathering areas, parties Highways, areas used for drug smuggling, areas away from the general population Radio/TV/paper coverage areas, word of mouth gathering points, Graffiti, posters SStructures State / District Centers, Polling Sites, Court House Preventive and Judicial Police HQ’s, Cartel leader’s house/business Day cares, gyms, electronic stores, meatpacking plants, dairies, hotels, gas stations, banks, Pharmacies, mining structure, industrial plants Churches, coffee chops, popular restaurants Roads, bridges, Low border fences and walls, compounds, rivers Cell, radio and TV towers, print shops CCapabilities Dispute resolution, local leadership, Justice System Preventive and Judicial Police, Investigative Agents of the Public Ministry, Defecting from the Mexican Military Bank and small business loans, money laundering Strength of family traditional structures, Priests, Traditional means of justice (eye for an eye) Ability to smuggle drugs on roads, over walls and fences, Conduct Cartel Operations inside compounds Literacy rate, availability of electronic media, phone service OOrganizations Political parties, group affiliations, Court system SEDENA, Public Ministry, Policia Federal Preventiva, Cartel Enforcer Gangs Banks, large landholders near borders, cooperatives, Travel and Export Agencies, Major illicit industries Families, soccer clubs, rich people Transportation Companies, Construction Companies, Real Estate Companies News organizations, influential churches, Cartel Propaganda Network PPeople Mayors, councils, Judges, prosecutors, Public Ministry Prosecutors, Preventive and Judicial Police Chiefs, Bankers, landholders, merchants, money lenders, Illegal facilitators, pilots, smuggling chain Catholic Priests, influential families, Entertainment figures Builders, road contractors, Realtors Media owners, Priests, Educators, Reporters, Radio DJ’s EEvents Elections, Municipal council meetings, Significant Court Cases Shoot-outs with Cartels, unit TTP’s, Military Defectors, operations Business opening, loss of business, Open- House Advertising, Foreclosures Quinceaneras, Sweet 16’s, holidays, weddings, deaths/funerals, births, graduations Road/bridge construction, Wall / Fence Construction, Construction of Isolated Communities Sunday Mass, publishing dates, IO campaigns, project openings, Cartel Incidents Measures to track effects... UNCLASSIFIED
  • 37. Working With Others 1. How many members does the Juarez Cartel have? 2. What key governmental employees are on the Juarez Cartel payroll? 3. What police officers are on the Juarez Cartel payroll? 4. When do key members of the Juarez Cartel meet? 5. When are shipments made to the USA? 6. Routes of smuggling? 7. Vehicles used by the Juarez Cartel? 8. Money house locations? 9. Drug house locations? 10. Phone numbers of key members? 11. Detailed descriptions of key members? 12. SPOT information about assassinations? 13. Who does the Juarez Cartel feel most threatened by and why? 14. Organization structure? 15. When and how are shipments made to the cartel? UNCLASSIFIED

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