Emotions   1




   Emotions


Angela Massiello


October 1, 2010


   PSY/240


  Susan Hull
Emotions      2




  Biopsychology offers a number of theories on emotion. There are four schools of

biopsychological th...
Emotions     3


that emotional expressions and experiences are parallel processes. James-Lange

anticipated that emotion ...
Emotions   4




References



  Pinel, J.P. (2007). Basics of biopsychology. Boston: Pearson Education.
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Transcript of "Emotions"

  1. 1. Emotions 1 Emotions Angela Massiello October 1, 2010 PSY/240 Susan Hull
  2. 2. Emotions 2 Biopsychology offers a number of theories on emotion. There are four schools of biopsychological theories. The first is based on Darwin, then there are Cannon-Bard and James Lange’s theories. The limbic system is also the basis for some of the other theories on emotion (Pinel, 2007). Darwin’s book, titled “The Expression of Emotion in Man and Animals” (1872), on the biological basis of emotion in which he presented the theory that emotional states and facial expression are connected (Pinel, 2007). In his theory, he constructed emotion as being evolutionarily based. An example of this is the threat displays that accompany facial expressions we term ‘angry’. These expressions are generally seen during aggressive or hostile human encounters (Pinel, 2007). James-Lange theorized that stimuli that promote emotion are received by the brain’s cortex and are interpreted by the brain. The brain signals cause visceral changes through the autonomic nervous system which affect the somatic nervous system and skeletal musculature as well (Pinel, 2007, p. 426). These changes are then responsible for emotion in the brain (Pinel, 2007). In Cannon-Bard’s theories, emotion is seen as the response to interactions between two separately occurring stimuli (Pinel, 2007). In Cannon-Bard, stimuli that induce emotions cause the emotion to be felt in the brain as well as being expressed in the autonomic nervous system and the somatic nervous system (Pinel, 2007, p.426). These two theories differ in that Cannon-Bard theorized
  3. 3. Emotions 3 that emotional expressions and experiences are parallel processes. James-Lange anticipated that emotion is the direct cause of reactions (Pinel, 2007, p. 426). Limbic theories are based on the idea that emotional expression is regulated by the thalamus’ border. The expression of our emotional states is based on the reactions of the hypothalamus and limbic structures. The limbic theory also assumes that the limbic system further interacts with the cortex to allow for emotional experience (Pinel, 2007, p. 428).
  4. 4. Emotions 4 References Pinel, J.P. (2007). Basics of biopsychology. Boston: Pearson Education.

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