• Share
  • Email
  • Embed
  • Like
  • Save
  • Private Content
Chapter 1   hausman book
 

Chapter 1 hausman book

on

  • 1,499 views

This is the first chapter of Social Media Marketing: The Art and Science of Building a Brand. I'd love your feedback as I edit the rest of the book.

This is the first chapter of Social Media Marketing: The Art and Science of Building a Brand. I'd love your feedback as I edit the rest of the book.

Statistics

Views

Total Views
1,499
Views on SlideShare
1,492
Embed Views
7

Actions

Likes
1
Downloads
6
Comments
0

3 Embeds 7

http://dmcodyssey.org 4
http://pinterest.com 2
http://www.pinterest.com 1

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Adobe PDF

Usage Rights

CC Attribution-ShareAlike LicenseCC Attribution-ShareAlike License

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

    Chapter 1   hausman book Chapter 1 hausman book Document Transcript

    • Hausman  and  Associates   1   Hausman  Marketing  Letter      
    •   I. What  is  Social  Media  Marketing   and  Why  YOU  Need  It?  What  is  Social  Media  Marketing?  Simply  put,  social  media  marketing  is  an  effort  to  support  your  brand  using  one  or  more  social  networking  platforms.         “Social  media  marketing  consists  of  the  firm’s  efforts  to   create  content  on  various  social  networking  platforms.     The  goal  is  to  encourage  users  to  engage  the  firm  on   these  platforms  and  share  its  messages  throughout  the   users’  own  social  network.”    Social  media  experts  often  include  paid  advertising  on  social  networks  (such  as  Facebook  sponsored  stories),  banner  advertising  on  other  websites  (including  AdWords),  and  sites,  and  Affiliate  Marketing  as  part  of  social  media  marketing.    However,  these  tools  fit  equally  well  with  notions  of  traditional  marketing  and  media.    In  this  book,  for  the  most  part,  we’ll  discuss  UNPAID  social  media  marketing  –  something  Wharton  (School  of  Business)  calls  “earned  advertising”.    In  Chapter  11,  we’ll  discuss  paid  advertising  on  social  networks  briefly.    Much  of  what  we  present  in  terms  of  concepts  and  strategies  that  optimize  your   2  
    • Hausman  and  Associates   3   Hausman  Marketing  Letter    “earned  advertising”  also  work  effectively  with  these  paid  advertising  tactics.    Social  networks  provide  marketing  tools  to  build  one-­‐on-­‐one  relationships  with  customers  and  create  a  community  of  loyal  customers  who  continue  buying  your  brand  and  draw  in  future  customers.    Social  networks  also  motivate  people  to  share  their  great  experiences  with  your  products  and  people  and  become  advocates  for  your  brand.        Social  media  marketing  gives  giant  multi-­‐nationals  all  the  advantages  of  the  little  pushcart  guy  who  truly  knows  his  customers  and  shoots  the  breeze  with  passers  by.    It  turns  any  business  into  “Cheers”  where  “everyone  knows  your  name”.      Social  media  marketing  is  much  more  than  just  Facebook,  although,  with  nearly  1  billion  users,  Facebook  is  the  largest  social  platform.    Facebook,  Twitter,  and  LinkedIn  are  considered  the  top  3  social  platforms  (at  least  at  the  time  this  book  was  written).    But,  new  social  networks  arrive  on  the  digital  landscape  every  week  –  including  Google+  and  Pinterest,  which  gained  followers  more  quickly  than  comparable  platforms.    Other  common  platforms  include:  YouTube  (for  video-­‐sharing),  Instagram  (photo-­‐sharing),  Foursquare  (a  location-­‐based  social  platform),  Reddit  (a  social  bookmarking  platform),  and  many  more.    In  fact,  there  are  probably  hundreds,  maybe  even  thousands,  of  social  platforms.    Some  are  specialized  for  specific  types  of  content,  like  YouTube  is  for  video,    
    • others  are  specialized  to  a  specific  demographic,  such  as  Mixi  for  Japanese.    More  than  300  million  people  spend  at  least  one  hour  a  day  on  Facebook,  approximately  200  million  people  are  active  on  Twitter,  and  100  million  use  LinkedIn1.    The  most  active  social  media  users  are  18-­‐  to  34-­‐year-­‐olds  (82%)  and  women  (78%,  vs.  66%  of  men),  according  to  a  survey  by  Netpop  Research2.  However,  according  to  CBS,  80%  of  baby  boomers  are  online;  mostly  on  Facebook3.    Socially  savvy  consumers  likely  employ  multiple  social  networks,  so  these  numbers  do  not  reflect  unique  users,  but  the  numbers  are  still  staggering2.    By  2014,  65.8  percent  of  Internet  users  are  likely  to  become  regular  social  network  users4.    But,  don’t  forget  blogging  (a  blog  is  short  for  weblog).    Blogs  are  one  of  the  earliest  forms  of  social  networks,  dating  from  19945.  Originally  consisting  of  online  diaries  with  limited  appeal,  except  for  those  run  by  journalists,  today’s  blogs  are  powerful  tools  for  branding,  creating  engagement,  and  generating  revenue  through  online  advertising.      We’ll  see  later  why  nearly  90%  of  firms  plan  to  increase  their  usage  of  blogs  in  the  future6.    Blogging  software  makes  it  incredibly  easy  for  folks  with  limited  technical  ability  and  NO  programming  knowledge  to  create  attractive  and  effective  websites.    Content  management  systems  such  as  WordPress  (my  personal  favorite),  Drupal,  and  Joomla   4  
    • Hausman  and  Associates   5   Hausman  Marketing  Letter    allow  users,  with  a  little  effort  and  practice,  to  create  professional-­looking  websites.    But,  more  than  these  tools  and  tactics,  social  media  marketing  is  a  paradigm  shift  from  traditional  marketing.    Engagement  is  the  mantra  of  this  new  paradigm  and  gifting  is  its  currency.    Let’s  take  a  look  at  how  new  media  differs  from  traditional  media:         New  Media                 Traditional  Media   Two-­‐way  conversation   One-­‐way  conversation   Open  system     Closed  system   Transparent   Opaque   One-­‐on-­‐one  marketing   Mass  marketing   About  you   About  ME   Brand  and  User-­‐generated  Content   Professional  content   Authentic  content   Polished  content   FREE  platform   Paid  platform   Metric:  Engagement   Metric:  Reach/  frequency   Actors:  Users/  Influencers   Actors/  Celebrities   Community  decision-­‐making   Economic  decision-­‐making   Unstructured  communication   Controlled  communication   Real  time  creation   Pre-­‐produced/  scheduled   Bottom-­‐up  strategy   Top-­‐down  strategy   Informal  language   Formal  language   Active  involvement   Passive  involvement    
    •    Why  Social  Media  Marketing?  Not  every  firm  chooses  social  media  as  a  means  to  market  their  brands.    For  instance,  Apple  Computers  doesn’t  own  any  social  media  territory.    OK,  so  there’s  a  little  Facebook  FanPage,  but  Apple,  Inc  almost  NEVER  posts  anything  or  responds  to  posts  there  –  it’s  not  even  clear  if  this  is  really  owned  by  Apple.    You  certainly  don’t  see  any  social  media  icons  listed  on  Apple’s  website.    No  obligatory:  “follow  us”  on  Twitter  or  Facebook  in  their  advertising  or  packaging.    Some  may  find  this  shocking  considering  Apple’s  reputation  as  a  technology  innovator  and  the  darling  of  the  social  media  generation.    I  mean,  Apple  created  an  early  version  of  social  sharing  with  iTunes.    But,  knowing  Steve  Jobs,  Apple’s  co-­‐founder,  it’s  not  surprising  he  liked  to  control  the  conversation  about  his  brand7.    Apple  encourages  consumers  to  interact  –  with  the  forums  on  their  website,  not  in  the  free-­‐for-­‐all  of  social  networks.    Through  its  forums,  Apple  CONTROLS  the  conversation  and  conscientious  moderators  remove  posts  that  conflict  with  Apple’s  view  of  their  brand.    Other  firms,  big  and  small,  find  it  harder  to  avoid  social  media  –  including  iconic  brands  like  Coke  and  Starbucks.    Ford  recently  reintroduced  its  Mustang  using  a  social  app  allowing  users  to  customize  their  own  version  of  a  Mustang.    And  this  tactic  was  a  resounding   6  
    • Hausman  and  Associates   7   Hausman  Marketing  Letter    success.    Facebook  “Likes”  nearly  doubled  on  the  Mustang  FanPage  in  just  a  few  months8.    As  you  can  see  from  the  Ford  example,  firms  see  social  media  marketing  as  a  valuable  tool  for  marketing  their  brands.    For  instance,  Social  Media  Examiner  found  83%  of  the  nearly  4000  marketers  surveyed  believe  social  media  marketing  is  important  for  their  business9.    Many  marketers  plan  to  increase  their  use  of  and  budget  for  social  media  marketing.    In  a  recent  report  from  Awareness,  marketing  managers  report  use  of  several  social  media  platforms  including  87%  using  Facebook,  86%  using  Twitter,  and  76%  using  LinkedIn6.    Moreover,  experienced  social  media  managers  plan  to  increase  their  use  of  various  forms  of  social  media  beyond  these  3  major  platforms  –  91%  plan  to  increase  use  of  blogs6.    In  addition  to  vast  numbers,  social  networks  appeal  to  firms  because  they  embed  commercial  actions  within  a  community10.  Thus,  social  media  reaches  organizational  goals  by  employing  “creative  and  communications  marketing  aspects  to  enliven  ideas,  unite  communities,  and  amplify  stories”11.  Blending  commercial  and  non-­‐commercial  expression  reflects  the  reality  that  purchase  behavior  “is  part  of  a  social  process....  it  involves  not  only  a  one-­‐to-­‐one  interaction  between  the  company  and  the  customer,  but  also  many  exchanges  of  information  and  influence  among  the  people  who  surround  the  customer."12.  Large  numbers  of  consumers  use  social  networks  as  a  major  source  of  this  information  and  influence.      
    •  Additional  factors  argue  for  corporate  use  of  social  media.    One  study  finds,  for  instance,  consumers  are  more  satisfied  with  retailers’  Facebook  pages  than  they  are  with  the  retailer’s  websites13.    Declines  in  the  effectiveness  of  alternative  communicative  channels,  such  as  television,  also  make  social  media  an  attractive  option14.    Disruptive,  self-­‐centered  conversations  marketers  commonly  employ  in  traditional  media  are  not  effective  in  social  media  and  marketers  must  find  new  ways  to  embed  messages  into  naturally-­‐occurring  conversations15.  Rather  than  broadcasting  marketing  messages  to  an  increasingly  indifferent,  even  resentful,  audience  jaded  by  the  2,000-­‐plus  messages  the  average  American  reportedly  see  every  day,  marketers  should  participate  in,  organize,  and  encourage  social  networks  to  which  people  want  to  belong.  Rather  than  talking  at  customers,  marketers  should  talk  with  them16.    The  top  3  benefits  marketers  find  from  using  social  media  marketing  are:  1)  building  brand  awareness;  2)  driving  traffic  to  their  websites  and  physical  stores,  and  3)  improved  customer  insights6.    Although  we’ll  talk  about  each  of  these  elements  in  more  depth  later  in  the  book,  let’s  take  a  look  at  each  benefit  briefly  now.    Building  Brand  Awareness  You  know  the  old  saying:  “Build  a  better  mousetrap  and  the  world  will  beat  a  path  to  your  door”  –  well  that  only  works  if  people  1)  know  about   8  
    • Hausman  and  Associates   9   Hausman  Marketing  Letter    your  mousetrap  and  2)  believe  it’s  better.    Otherwise,  the  path  to  your  door  will  be  pretty  overgrown.    Traditional  media  actually  does  a  pretty  good  job  of  building  brand  awareness  because  it  reaches  millions  of  people  with  memorable  messages  and  catchy  jingles.    But,  social  media  marketing  builds  a  DEEPER  awareness  of  your  brand.    Now,  instead  of  just  remembering  your  brand  name  and,  maybe,  a  few  factoids  about  your  brand,  social  media  marketing  encourages  consumers  to  develop  a  more  connected  set  of  attitudes  related  to  your  brand.    Instead  of  just  hoping  they’ll  get  warm  fuzziest  about  your  brand  because  they  like  the  celebrity  endorsing  your  brand,  social  media  uses  your  friends  to  endorse  the  brand.    Now,  you  not  only  know  about  the  brand,  but  you  know  what  your  social  network  thinks  about  it,  which  increases  the  likelihood  you’ll  buy  the  brand.    You  begin  to  see  the  brand  as  another  friend  and,  when  you  like  the  brand,  it  even  shows  up  in  your  newsfeed  just  like  other  friends.    With  social  media  marketing  you  not  only  develop  an  attitude  toward  the  brand,  you  develop  “feelings”  for  the  brand.      Driving  Traffic    
    • Alright,  I  don’t  want  to  get  into  too  much  of  this  now  (you’ll  get  a  lot  more  of  this  in  Chapter  9),  but  social  media  marketing  drives  a  lot  of  traffic  to  your  website  and  to  your  brick  and  mortar  store.    Increased  traffic  comes  through  2  related  channels  –  SEO  and  Customer  Insights.        SEO  OK,  pretend  you’re  an  average  user  looking  for  information  online.    First,  you  type  your  search  term  (keyword)  into  the  Google  Search  Engine  (or  Bing  or  Yahoo,  etc).    Google  returns  links  to  websites  that  match  your  search  –  or  SERPs,  which  is  an  acronym  for  Search  Engine  Results  Page.    If  you’re  the  average  user,  you’ll  start  exploring  links  near  the  top  of  the  SERPs  and  you’re  unlikely  to  go  beyond  the  first  page  or  so  in  the  results.        If  you’re  a  firm,  you  want  to  be  near  the  top  of  the  search  results  because  you  know  you’ll  get  more  traffic  that  way.    According  to  Optify,  you’ll  get  over  35%  of  the  search  traffic  when  you’re  in  the  first  position  in  the  SERPs,  but  only  about  12%  of  the  traffic  for  a  2nd  place  finish.    By  position  10,  you’ll  only  get  about  2%  of  the  traffic  visiting  your  site17.    Google  (and  Bing  and  Yahoo)  use  a  complex  algorithm  (that  changes  frequently)  to  determine  where  your  site  shows  up  in  the  SERPs.    And,  social  media  marketing  helps  your  site  rank  higher  in  2  ways.    First,  the  more  social  media  interest  you  generate  the  higher  you’ll  rank.    Second,  the  more  you  and  your  friends  engage  with  the  brand,  the  more  higher  Google  will  rank  the  site  in  YOUR  results  –  see  an  interesting  thing  is   10  
    • Hausman  and  Associates   11   Hausman  Marketing  Letter    that  not  everyone  will  see  the  same  SERPs.    SERPs  are  individualized  to  ensure  YOU  get  the  most  relevant  links  possible,  so  they’re  customized  to  what  Google  knows  about  your  online  activity.    Improving  Customer  Insights  Academic  readers  and  those  already  engaged  in  market  research  probably  already  recognize  the  value  of  all  the  data  consumers  share  about  themselves  on  social  platforms.    But,  the  average  social  media  marketer  probably  hasn’t  explored  this  data  deeply.    Using  sophisticated  ethnographic  tools  and  software  such  as  nVivo,  SPSS  Text  Analysis  Software,  and  HyperRESEARCH,  firms  can  understand  not  only  consumer  sentiment  about  the  brand,  but  elements  of  lifestyle,  unmet  needs,  and  other  critical  information  that  allows  the  firm  to  develop  new  offerings,  maximize  the  consumer  benefit  of  existing  offerings,  position  brands,  and  drive  consumer  demand  for  their  brands.    Although  developing  consumer  insights  is  a  major  benefit  of  social  media  marketing,  details  go  well  beyond  the  scope  of  this  book.    I’ll  list  some  resources  to  learn  more  about  developing  customer  insights  after  the  references  to  this  chapter.    Other  Major  Benefits  of  Social  Media  Marketing    
    • Here  are  a  few  more  reasons  why  your  firm  should  consider  social  media  marketing:          1.  COST  Social  media  marketing  is  much  more  cost  effective  than  traditional  advertising.    In  fact,  many  so-­called  social  media  gurus  contend  social  media  levels  the  playing  field  for  small  businesses  because  it’s  free.    Well,  that’s  not  exactly  true,  but  it’s  sure  cheaper  than  a  Super  Bowl  ad  –  at  over  $3  million  for  a  30  second  spot.    To  see  the  cost  effectiveness  of  social  media  advertising,  let’s  look  at  a  little  example  of  how  social  media  spreads  a  message  compared  with  traditional  media.     12  
    • Hausman  and  Associates   13   Hausman  Marketing  Letter    This  diagram  demonstrates  the  potential  reach  of  social  media  marketing,  which  is  vast.    This  example  assumes  2  million  people  see  your  message  across  your  various  social  media  touchpoints  –  YouTube,  Facebook,  etc.    Now,  2  million  eyeballs  may  seem  like  a  lot,  but  when  you  think  about  firms  like  Starbucks  that  have  16  MILLION  fans  on  Facebook  alone,  you  can  see  it’s  really  not  that  difficult  to  reach  2  million  users  when  using  multiple  social  networks.        Each  of  those  2  million  users  has,  on  average,  245  friends  according  to  the  Washington  Post.    If  only  10%  of  the  people  who  saw  your  message  share  it  with  their  network  –  you’d  reach  49  million  people.    And,  if  that  49  million  shared  the  same  way,  you’d  reach  1.2  billion  people.    And,  the  transmission  cost  –  the  amount  of  money  you  pay  to  get  this  reach  –  is  $0.        Now,  compare  that  with  traditional  media.    Even  the  Super  Bowl,  the  most  watched  program  2  years  running,  only  reached  111  million  viewers  in  2011,  according  to  the  Huffington  Post.    And  the  cost  of  a  single  ad  airing  on  the  Super  Bowl  was  over  $3  million  for  30  seconds,  which  doesn’t  include  the  production  costs  for  the  commercial,  which  can  be  another  million  or  more.    While  spreading  your  message  across  social  platforms  may  be  free  and  creating  a  presence  on  these  social  platforms  is  very  inexpensive,  doing  “good”  social  media  requires  other  resources.    You  have  to  create  content,  share  that  content  effectively,  and  encourage  linked  consumers    
    • to  share  your  content.    And,  whatever  you  do  in  social  media  has  to  be  done  consistently  and  regularly,  or  you  risk  turning  the  medium  against  you.    So,  you’ll  have  to  either  dedicate  some  time  for  an  employee  to  handle  your  social  media  or  add  it  to  the  already-­‐long  list  of  things  you  have  to  do.        How  much  time  will  it  take  to  do  “good”  social  media.    Well  large  companies  may  have  several  full-­‐time  employees  who  do  nothing  but  manage  their  social  media  platforms.    Richard  Branson  of  Virgin  Atlantic  employs  a  social  relations  team  combining  expertise  in  marketing,  advertising,  public  relations,  and  customer  service  to  manage  his  social  media  marketing  efforts1.      The  amount  firms  invest  in  social  media  marketing  varies  widely.    Most  small  businesses  spend  more  than  6  hours  a  week  managing  their  social  media  and  this  number  increases  as  the  firms  GAIN  experience9.    2.  TRACKABLE  Social  media  is  trackable.    While  it’s  still  difficult  to  directly  link  social  media  output  to  revenue,  social  media  marketing  efforts  generate  a  number  of  useful  metrics.    Set  things  up  right  and  you  can  tell  exactly  which  types  of  content  work  best  with  your  target  audience  and  calculate  ROI  pretty  accurately.      You  can  also  track:      How  people  reach  your  website  and  what  they  do  on  your  site   14  
    • Hausman  and  Associates   15   Hausman  Marketing  Letter      Where  people  go  after  they  leave  your  site    What  time  of  day  generates  the  most  click-­‐through  and/or  sharing    Which  social  platform  performs  better      How  social  media  engagement  indirectly  translates  into  ROI  for   your  firm.        Armed  with  this  knowledge,  a  marketing  strategist  can  more  easily  optimize  their  strategy  to  get  the  greatest  return.    You  can  also  do  A/B  testing  to  determine  which  offers  work  best,  which  copy  appeals  to  your  linked  users,  and  even  test  different  graphics  or  layout  performs  best.    We’ll  discuss  and  demonstrate  analytics  in  more  depth  in  Chapter  6.    3.  LOYALTY  Folks  confuse  loyalty  with  repeat  purchases.    Consumers  might  buy  your  stuff  over  again,  but  not  be  truly  loyal.    Loyal  consumers  not  only  buy  your  stuff,  but  resist  efforts  by  competitors  to  lure  them  away.    So,  when  your  competitor  offers  a  coupon  for  purchase,  other  consumers  might  switch,  but  loyal  consumers  stay  true  to  THEIR  brand.    Loyal  consumers  also  like  to  bask  in  the  light  of  their  brand  —  sharing  their  love  of  your  brand  with  their  friends.    Sharing  by  friends  is  a  major  motivator  driving  purchases.    
    •    Organization  of  the  Remainder  of  the  Book  Armed  with  your  expanded  knowledge  of  social  media  marketing,  the  next  chapter  will  refresh  and  deepen  your  knowledge  of  traditional  marketing  concepts,  demonstrating  how  these  concepts  impact  the  success  of  your  social  media  marketing  efforts.  Chapter  3  delves  more  into  consumer  behavior  that  underpins  online  behavior  and  helps  you  understand  how  users  make  buying  decisions  on  social  networks.    The  next  7  chapters  expand  on  the  most  popular  post  from  Hausman  Marketing  Letter  –  the  top  7  skills  you’ll  need  to  make  your  social  media  marketing  successful.    Chapter  4  discusses  how  to  organize  for  social  media  marketing  success  listing  tools  and  strategies  necessary.    Chapter  5  shows  why  social  media  marketing  takes  time.    The  chapter  includes  pert  charts  demonstrating  the  pathways  to  success,  a  checklist  of  daily  and  weekly  activities  necessary,  and  sources  of  help  in  getting  these  tasks  done.    Chapter  6  discusses  metrics  and  how  to  use  them  to  guide  decision-­‐making.    Online  sentiment  is  the  topic  of  Chapter  7,  including  the  topics  of  listening  and  coding  sentiment,  maintaining  your  online  reputation,  and  crisis  management.    Chapter  8  covers  the  important  aspects  of  creating  valuable  content.    Finally,  Chapter  9  discusses  how   16  
    • Hausman  and  Associates   17   Hausman  Marketing  Letter    sharing  works  across  some  of  the  major  social  networks  and  how  to  make  sure  your  message  shows  up.    Chapter  10  tries  to  bring  everything  together  –  showing  how  to  integrate  your  social  media  marketing  across  platforms  and  how  to  integrate  online  marketing  with  mobile  and  offline  marketing.    Finally,  Chapter  11  discusses  some  paid  advertising  options  and  how  to  use  them  to  support  your  earned  advertising  strategy.      Chapters  10  and  11  also  include  case  studies  of  successful  social  media  strategies  and  how  your  business  can  duplicate  these  strategies.    Sometimes,  I’m  challenged  at  a  speaking  event  or  client  pitch  by  notions  that  social  media  marketing  only  works  for  certain  types  of  firms  or  in  certain  areas.    That’s  not  true  and  I  hope  to  show  you  this  in  my  case  studies.    Connect  with  us  to  get  updates  on  the  book  :