Answers to review packet titled

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  • 1. Answers to Review Packet titled: REGENTS EARTH SCIENCE- Earth History Review 1. 4 (Scientist use fossils to correlate rocks) 2. 3 (Look at Inferred Positions of Earths Landmasses p9 in ESRT) 3. 3 (look under important geologic events in NY) 4. 1 (look under NY Rock Record column) 5. 3 (251mya -65.5 mya =185.5 mys divide by 10 =18.6 6. 4 (Precambrian 1300 mya to 4600 mya) 7. 2 (grains must of been loose, then later cemented) 8. 2 (rock is always older than process that changed it) 9. 1 (need to use igneous rock chart, look up felsic) 10. 2 (law of superposition) 11. 4 (resistant to weathering and erosion so still at high elevation 12. 3 (law of inclusions, must have already been present to be included in that rock) 13. 3 ( sedimentary layers are oldest b/c rock is always older than the processes that change it; folding before intrusion since intrusion is not folded; intrusion is faulted so faulting is youngest event) 14. A (extrusion is always younger than the rock that is beneath it) 15. 4 (in order for erosion to take place, uplift must occur first, these rock on the left side of the fault have subsided or sunk down, therefore erosion must of happened before the fault due to uplift due to folding) 16. 4 (D is pointing to the dike with branching sills, the sill towards the top of the diagram cuts through fault along C, so the intrusion is youngest) 17. 1 (law of cross cutting relationships) 18. 2 ( none of the other choice make sense) 19. 3 ( time makers always happen over a brief period of time and are widespread) 20. 4 ( time makers always happen over a brief period of time and are widespread)
  • 2. Answers to Review Packet titled: REGENTS EARTH SCIENCE- Earth History Review 21. 1 (erosion removes part of the rock record this is called an unconformity) 22. 1 (usually things are uplifted and then eroded) 23. 2 ( no fossil are shown in the diagram) 24. 3 (we use fossils to learn about evolution) 25. 2 ( use color to correlate) 26. 2 ( whenever layers are missing it is evidence that erosion happened) 27. 3 ( look under life under earth, the Pennsylvanian period is part of the Paleozoic era) 28. 1 ( use p. 3 in ESRT to find the age of each city; ( Syracuse is Silurian, Oswego is Ordovician, Ithaca is Devonian, Old Forge is Metamorphic, so it cant have fossils. Use the geo history of NY chart to pick that Syracuse had the earliest land plants (terrestrial means land)) 29. You cant answer this because it is from the old ESRT 30.3 (after one half life, you will have 50% stable daughter decay product and 50% unstable radioactive parent material) 31. 4 ( 18 x 10^9 divided by 4.5 x 10^9 is 4 half lives, so after one half life there will be half of 24g or 12g, half life 2: 12/2 is 6, half life 3: 6/2 is 3 and half life 4 : 3/2 is 1.5g!!! 32. 4 ( both existed in the Quaternary period, flower plants still exist) 33. 2 (must be between the Ordovician and the Permian, and must have shale) 34. 2 ( need to compare the existence and extinction of each) 35. 4 (needs to fall in the Ordovician time period between 444 and 488) 36. 4 (fossils are rarely found from the Precambrian because there was no life in the Precambrian!) 37. cant answer this based off old ESRT 38. 3 ( Three half lives have been completed 3 x 1.3 x 10^9 ) 39. 4 ( use bedrock age of Ordovician and look under life on earth) 40. 4 (when mammals took over, dinosaurs became extinct) 41. 3 (dinosaurs are only in this one of all the other choice
  • 3. Answers to Review Packet titled: REGENTS EARTH SCIENCE- Earth History Review