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L3 development and water insecurity
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L3 development and water insecurity

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  • 1. Anagrams • inhac • China • citycars • Scarcity • timecods • Domestic • dcraoool • Colorado • retucirgual • Agriculture
  • 2. 1. Human impacts on Water Availability 2. Access to water is often related to and controlled by wealth and poverty.
  • 3. Homework • Make notes on ‘Human impacts on water availability’ from p40-41.
  • 4. Access to water is often related to and controlled by wealth and poverty. To explore the link between water insecurity and contrasting levels of development
  • 5. Access to water is often related to and controlled by wealth and poverty.
  • 6. Access to water is often related to and controlled by wealth and poverty.
  • 7. Describe the correlation between rainfall and economic growth Graph to show correlation between GDP and Rainfall in Zimbabwe Describe the correlation between rainfall and economic growth
  • 8. • How rainfall can affect economic growth • Apr 14th 2009 • DEVELOPING countries are more at risk from climate change because of their dependence on agriculture, especially the subsistence sort with poor irrigation. Climate variability has a more severe impact on the economies in which agriculture is a large share of GDP. In Ethiopia, around 75% of the population are dependent on farming, which is almost entirely small-scale and rain-fed. A further 10% earn their living from livestock. During the famine of the 1980s, rainfall was well below average and growth plunged. Whether rainfall is an accurate indicator of GDP growth is another matter, however. This chart from the United Nations appears to show changes in GDP growth preceding similar changes in rainfall in certain years.
  • 9. How much money is spent annually on improving water supply? A. $10B B. $20B C. $30B D. $40B
  • 10. How much money is spent annually on improving water supply? A. $10B B. $20B C. $30B D. $40B
  • 11. Access to water is often related to and controlled by wealth and poverty • Water insecurity? (p41) – Not having access to sufficient, safe water. • Water insecurity is related to three issues; – Availability – Access – Usage
  • 12. Water Poverty Index Website here 1. Resources 2. Access 3. Capacity 4. Use 5. Environment
  • 13. How does water scarcity effect development?
  • 14. Poverty • Look at the gapminder graph here
  • 15. Across the world where is water most expensive? D C B A
  • 16. The Price of water • Read the BBC newspaper article
  • 17. Examples; Canada & Ethiopia
  • 18. Homework and next lesson whilst I’m away 1. Complete the past part A question • Suggest how water resources and human wellbeing might be affected by the data presented in Figure 2 (10m)
  • 19. MARK SCHEME
  • 20. Indicative content • The resource indicates that the poor pay more for water, and this suggests that a greater proportion of their income must be spent on the most basic resource. • The effects on human health are likely to focus on an inability of some to meet their basic water needs – and therefore prevalence of disease, dangers of using unsanitary supply. For developed countries, the implication is that basic sanitation is cheap – some might see the irony in this. • The effect on water resources are that low costs encourage overuse in developed countries as the costs may not represent the true cost – drainage of aquifers may be mentioned. • Whilst individual overuse is unlikely to be an issue in the developing world, total use may still be leading to scarcity.
  • 21. Levels • Level 1 1-4 Structure is poor or absent. One or two basic ideas, likely to lift off the resource and describe the contrast. Explanations are over simplified and lack clarity. • Geographical terminology is rarely used with accuracy. There are frequent grammar, punctuation and spelling errors. • Level 2 5-7 Structure is satisfactory. Shows understanding of the data, and mentions water resources and human wellbeing linked to some explanations. Lacks balance. • Explanations are clear, but there are areas of less clarity. Geographical terminology is used with some accuracy. There are some grammar, punctuation and spelling errors. • Level 3 8-10 Structure is good. Thorough reasoning of the implications for both humans and resources; balanced and explanatory. Descriptive language is precise. Explanations are always clear. Geographical terminology is used with accuracy. Grammar, punctuation and spelling errors are rare.

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