Applied Ethics and the Olympics (Lecture 1 of 5)

3,220
-1

Published on

Introduction lecture for the International Olympic Academy Postgraduate Seminar on Olympic Studies, 2009

Published in: Education, Sports, Technology
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
3,220
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Applied Ethics and the Olympics (Lecture 1 of 5)

  1. 1. INTRODUCTION: ETHICS AND THE OLYMPICS Applied Ethics & the Olympic Movement Lecture 1 of 5 17th INTERNATIONAL SEMINAR ON OLYMPIC STUDIES FOR POSTGRADUATE STUDENTS, 2009 July Professor Andy Miah, PhD University of the West of Scotland, UK Professor Andy Miah, PhD University of the West of Scotland, UK email@andymiah.net
  2. 2. INTRODUCTION: ETHICS AND THE OLYMPICS MY OLYMPIC BIOGRAPHY • International Olympic Academy – 2000, 2001, 2003, 2008 • IOC Museum, Lausanne, 2001 • 2001, Olympic Scholars Network – Now: Culture at the Olympics – http://www.culturalolympics.org.uk • Research at the last 5 Olympics – winter and summer – 8-10 days of Olympic Games period • Research into the ethics of technological culture • Olympic Games Street scene – Cultural, political, media Professor Andy Miah, PhD University of the West of Scotland, UK email@andymiah.net
  3. 3. INTRODUCTION: ETHICS AND THE OLYMPICS OUTLINE OF LECTURES: ETHICS & THE OLYMPICS • NEW MEDIA ETHICS – Citizen journalism • ENVIRONMENTAL ETHICS – UNEP and IOC • BIOETHICS – Genetically modified athletes • HUMAN RIGHTS – Olympic activism Professor Andy Miah, PhD University of the West of Scotland, UK email@andymiah.net
  4. 4. INTRODUCTION: ETHICS AND THE OLYMPICS NEW MEDIA ETHICS • Who can report the Olympic Games? • What are the implications of broadcast- quality hand held devices being used in venues and around the Olympic city? • What should we make of the IOC’s deal with YouTube to reach new regions? • Do we need a new approach to reporting the Olympics? Professor Andy Miah, PhD University of the West of Scotland, UK email@andymiah.net
  5. 5. INTRODUCTION: ETHICS AND THE OLYMPICS ENVIRONMENTAL ETHICS • In what way has the IOC’s environmentalism promoted or inhibited progress towards sustainability? • Can Olympic competition take place in an era of limited resources? • Is there still a moral dilemma over the environment? • Does the IOC’s alignment with the UN assist the Olympic mission? Professor Andy Miah, PhD University of the West of Scotland, UK email@andymiah.net
  6. 6. INTRODUCTION: ETHICS AND THE OLYMPICS BIOETHICS • How should we regard performance enhancement in sport? • Does the prospect of genetically modified athletes signal the end of sport? • Is sport still a natural pursuit? • Should we drug test kids in high school and seek criminal sanctions for doping? Professor Andy Miah, PhD University of the West of Scotland, UK email@andymiah.net
  7. 7. INTRODUCTION: ETHICS AND THE OLYMPICS HUMAN RIGHTS • In what way should they concern the IOC? • Is the Olympic Movement still a humanitarian movement? • Can the IOC align itself with human rights, while maintaining an apolitical status? • How have rights issues been present at the Olympics? Professor Andy Miah, PhD University of the West of Scotland, UK email@andymiah.net
  8. 8. INTRODUCTION: ETHICS AND THE OLYMPICS Overarching theme • Social justice • The good life • Ethical conduct Professor Andy Miah, PhD University of the West of Scotland, UK email@andymiah.net
  9. 9. The Olympics should be about change. Posters from INTRODUCTION: ETHICS AND THE OLYMPICS a Sydney underground station, during 2000 Games Professor Andy Miah, PhD University of the West of Scotland, UK email@andymiah.net
  10. 10. Torino 2006 Athletes’ Village INTRODUCTION: ETHICS AND THE OLYMPICS Professor Andy Miah, PhD University of the West of Scotland, UK email@andymiah.net
  11. 11. INTRODUCTION: ETHICS AND THE OLYMPICS Torino 2006 Official Slogan ‘Passion Lives Here’ Professor Andy Miah, PhD University of the West of Scotland, UK email@andymiah.net
  12. 12. INTRODUCTION: ETHICS walk from the Athletes’ village Torino 2006 a few minutes AND THE OLYMPICS ‘repression lives here’ protest Professor Andy Miah, PhD University of the West of Scotland, UK email@andymiah.net
  13. 13. INTRODUCTION: ETHICS AND THE OLYMPICS The Olympic Charter • “Olympism is a philosophy of life, where blending sport and culture with art and education aims to combine in a balanced whole the human qualities of body, will and mind.” • “Olympism is a way of life based on respect for human dignity and fundamental universal ethical principles, on the joy of effort and participation, on the educational role of good example, a way of life based on mutual understanding.” Professor Andy Miah, PhD University of the West of Scotland, UK email@andymiah.net
  14. 14. INTRODUCTION: ETHICS AND THE OLYMPICS Alternatively, is Olympism... • the commodification of belief? • the commercial value of moral convictions? • Claim 1: The Olympic values do have special, social significance. • Claim 2: The special, social significance of the rings has become reduced to a set of financial transactions. • Our job in this week is to interrogate Claim 2 Professor Andy Miah, PhD University of the West of Scotland, UK email@andymiah.net
  15. 15. INTRODUCTION: ETHICS AND THE OLYMPICS Celebrate Humanity • Campaign from 2001-2004 • Promote Olympic ideals Professor Andy Miah, PhD University of the West of Scotland, UK email@andymiah.net
  16. 16. INTRODUCTION: ETHICS AND THE OLYMPICS THE IOC REFORMS 1999 • Formation of the Ethics Commission • Establishment of bid protocol for IOC members • IOC Code of Ethics drafted Professor Andy Miah, PhD University of the West of Scotland, UK email@andymiah.net
  17. 17. INTRODUCTION: ETHICS AND THE OLYMPICS THE IOC REFORMS 1999 • Only gifts of nominal value, in accordance with prevailing local customs, may be given or accepted by the Olympic parties, as a mark of respect or friendship. Any other gift must be passed on to the organization of which the beneficiary is a member (IOC Code of Ethics, 2007, April 26) Professor Andy Miah, PhD University of the West of Scotland, UK email@andymiah.net
  18. 18. INTRODUCTION: ETHICS AND THE OLYMPICS IOC Members’ Oath • “Granted the honour of becoming a member of the International Olympic Committee and of representing it, and declaring myself aware of my responsibilities in such capacity, I undertake to serve the Olympic Movement to the very best of my ability, to respect and ensure the respect of all the provisions of the Olympic Charter and the decisions of the IOC, which I consider as not subject to appeal on my part, to comply with the Code of Ethics, to keep myself free from any political or commercial influence and from any racial or religious consideration, to fight against all other forms of discrimination and to defend in all circumstances the interests of the IOC and those of the Olympic Movement.” • Oath taken by every new IOC member, Olympic Charter, 20 (1.3) Professor Andy Miah, PhD University of the West of Scotland, UK email@andymiah.net
  19. 19. INTRODUCTION: ETHICS AND THE OLYMPICS Professor Andy Miah, PhD University of the West of Scotland, UK email@andymiah.net
  20. 20. INTRODUCTION: ETHICS AND THE OLYMPICS Professor Andy Miah, PhD University of the West of Scotland, UK email@andymiah.net
  21. 21. INTRODUCTION: ETHICS AND THE OLYMPICS The challenge from Olympism is to engage with the contested claims of universals and particulars. As a unifying philosophical project, the Olympic Movement must assuage to a series of relativist claims, which limit its capacity to fully aspire to the universal values of sport. Professor Andy Miah, PhD University of the West of Scotland, UK email@andymiah.net
  22. 22. INTRODUCTION: ETHICS AND THE OLYMPICS Overarching Questions • Where should we look for an ethical foundation to Olympism? • Are there instances of universally accepted values within the Olympic Movement? Professor Andy Miah, PhD University of the West of Scotland, UK email@andymiah.net
  23. 23. INTRODUCTION: ETHICS AND THE OLYMPICS Discussion: The Olympic Torch Relay • After Beijing 2008, the IOC have questioned the role of the torch relay’s international leg indicating that it will cease to exist. • Yet, the relay is the single live moment that contributes most to the democratization of the Olympic Games, an otherwise restricted public experience. • Is it right to curtail the international leg of the relay? Professor Andy Miah, PhD University of the West of Scotland, UK email@andymiah.net
  24. 24. INTRODUCTION: ETHICS AND THE OLYMPICS Professor Andy Miah, PhD University of the West of Scotland, UK email@andymiah.net
  25. 25. INTRODUCTION: ETHICS AND THE OLYMPICS Professor Andy Miah, PhD University of the West of Scotland, UK email@andymiah.net
  26. 26. INTRODUCTION: ETHICS AND THE OLYMPICS Finally • What do you think are the most pressing ethical issues for the Olympic Movement? Professor Andy Miah, PhD University of the West of Scotland, UK email@andymiah.net

×