Nycon social media nyfa presentation
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  • GOALS: Introduction to Social Media Speed Dating with Popular Tools of Social Media (Facebook, Twitter, Blogs, YouTube) 5 Rules of Social Media to Help you Get Stared
  • All can be utilized for your business if you have a clear idea of what you want from it, what you have to give to it and for how long. If you build it they won’t come.
  • Social media is PEOPLE FIRST, NOT TOOLS. What’s new with social media? What’s new with YOUR NONPROFIT? Helps nonprofits capture the “long tail of marketing” Every nonprofit is famous to 15 people. Who are your 15 people?
  • Whisper down the lane. What are the pros and cons of whisper down the lane. Even if your clear the message can change. Loss of control. To use social media well, a nonprofit must understand how it differs from traditional media, which typically follow a broadcast model involving one organization controlling a message it delivers to many people simultaneously. To use social media well, a nonprofit must understand how it differs from traditional media, which typically follow a broadcast model involving one organization controlling a message it delivers to many people simultaneously. Social media is two-way messaging over which nonprofits have little control, says Beth Kanter, a scholar-in-residence for nonprofits and social media at the Packard Foundation. It's a different kind of distribution where the nonprofit reaches influential people who then reach their friends with their own message about a cause. "You need to build your network before you need it," says Kanter. "There's not yet a specific formula that works for everyone. It's a lot of small experiments and you reiterate." To get started, she recommends a heavy dose of listening in order to monitor and track where people are online and what they're saying. Then it's time to engage in the conversation, but be careful not to preach. "Talk to people, don't just throw your message at them," says Kanter. Once an organization has become a participant in the conversation, it can begin to share its story by developing a blog or starting a YouTube channel. More important than that, though, is getting supporters to create content about a nonprofit. To "generate buzz," Kanter recommends spreading a message quickly and widely through Twitter or Digg, a news service that can generate traffic. Finally, it's time to develop an online community, she says. "First you get insights - what works and what doesn't," says Kanter. "The next thing you see is engagement - the conversation. Once you've measured that, you can start to track to taking an action. And the holy grail is linking that to true social change." These days, websites are becoming more like social networks, where supporters and constituents can talk online. And almost one in three nonprofits report they maintain their own in-house social networking site, says the NTEN study. That requires an online community manager, someone who interacts with supporters in an online environment. While the process isn't necessarily difficult, it does take time to do it well, says Kanter. "If this isn't your priority, maybe you shouldn't be doing it," she says. Getting to the stage where supporters are truly engaged takes about 18 months, says Kanter, and is heavy on experimentation and "reiteration." "Nonprofits should enter the world of social media, but they should do it strategically," she says. "Not incredibly planned, but knowing you're going to fail. That's the way to success - reiterate."
  • Without social media you would have a different president. WHY? Connected to the basic principles of social media RIGHT TIME (time when people were desperate for change. Strong motivating factors.) RIGHT MESSAGE (authentic message, people believed that he could DEVLIVER that change.) EASY TO ACT (campaign asked for specific actions and made it easy, you could donate $5, you could make calls, you could volunteer on election day….) HOW CAN YOUR NONPROFIT DO THE SAME ON A SCALED DOWN BASIS?
  • Study of execs- defined reason for success was.
  • To get started, she recommends a heavy dose of listening in order to monitor and track where people are online and what they're saying. General research tools Domain / Username Checking: KnowEm.com , CheckUsernames.com , Claim.io (all solid options) Alternative Site Research : SimilarSites.com (the most robust website alternative engine), SmilarSiteSearch.com , SitesLike.com Blog / Blogger Identification: AllTop.com (online blog ‘magazine rack’), IceRocket.com (use the advanced blog search function for best effect), Google.com/Blogsearch (always improving). Influencer Research / Identification: This is a much-debated topic thanks to the existence of Klout.com , PeerIndex.net , Kred.ly and the like. While these tools are useful to a degree, the listening tools listed above (when used manually), are just as useful.
  • re important than that, though, is getting supporters to create content about a nonprofit. To "generate buzz," Kanter recommends spreading a message quickly and widely through Twitter or Digg, a news service that can generate traffic.
  • "First you get insights - what works and what doesn't," says Kanter. "The next thing you see is engagement - the conversation. Once you've measured that, you can start to track to taking an action. And the holy grail is linking that to true social change." These days, websites are becoming more like social networks, where supporters and constituents can talk online. And almost one in three nonprofits report they maintain their own in-house social networking site, says the NTEN study. That requires an online community manager, someone who interacts with supporters in an online environment. While the process isn't necessarily difficult, it does take time to do it well, says Kanter. "If this isn't your priority, maybe you shouldn't be doing it," she says. Getting to the stage where supporters are truly engaged takes about 18 months, says Kanter, and is heavy on experimentation and "reiteration." "Nonprofits should enter the world of social media, but they should do it strategically," she says. "Not incredibly planned, but knowing you're going to fail. That's the way to success - reiterate."
  • Now we know the basic concepts behind social media – and why we want to use it… Let’s learn a little more about four mainstay tools: FB, Twitter, Blogs, YouTube See an example of what each does… Weigh pro’s and con’s (you can relate them to your nonprofit’s goals.)
  • Likes long walks on the beach…
  • YouTube’s Nonprofit Channel Much of what we do is more powerful when people see it.
  • A little complicated..> Looks good at first – but sometimes you have to put some work into it to get it to be what you want it to be. Do some digging to find what you want.
  • “ It’s just lunch.” Micro-blogging Allows you to share short snippets of information, link, time sensitive announcements, organized a large group (advocacy)
  • Dialogue drive means people expect a response from YOU ALL you say online never goes away. Twitter more than any other tool give you the ability to express yourself in a personal and emotionally responsive way.
  • Summary: All of these tools should be used towards a specific, measurable goal. The worst thing I have seen companies do is jump in and out of multiple tools just to “see” if it “works.” Define what success would be to your org. even if it’s just that you want to see an increase in blog readership from 0 to 20 readers in 6 months because you’re goal is to build an educated base. Or one donation via your facebook page in the first 3 months of operation New audiences are already online and maybe some you already know, but mostly You are going to have to develop a plan to move your traditional audience to an online audience
  • Klout’s one of the more well-known tools on the social market and says its mission is to identify who has influence on the Web, how much of it they have and on what topics they are influential about Twylah trumps everyone in terms of being interesting and what the service is actually able to provide. Though listed second, this is my favorite tool on the list TwentyFeet gives you a graphical view of how you’re influence is doing on various social media channels. The service allows you to track one Twitter account and one Facebook account for free, and then offers the option to pay for additional accounts at $2.50 a year. Yes, $2.50 a year. While not as flashy as some of the other tools, Peer Index does a good job at helping you understand what topics you and others are influential about. And surprisingly, they seem to get it right more often than not SproutSocial It’s a complete social media monitoring tool. However, the single dashboard provided to help business owners manage multiple accounts does a pretty good job doubling as a benchmarking tool for those inclined to use it as such. There’s even a weekly scorecard to help you keep track of New Followers, Mentions, Message Volume and Engagement Levels, as well as data to let you know which of your links get the most clicks

Nycon social media nyfa presentation Nycon social media nyfa presentation Presentation Transcript

  • Social Media: If You Build It, They Won’t Come...ANDREW MARIETTA, REGIONAL MANAGER, NEW YORK COUNCIL OF NONPROFITS WWW.NYCON.ORG 800.515.5012 ext. 141 amarietta@nycon.org
  • Agenda1.T eN e fr Srtg h ed o a tae y2.W a A eteB s T os h t r h et o l3.N wM k IW r o a e t ok
  • Who’s Heard of These?• Blogs• Wikis• RSS Feeds• Facebook• YouTube• Delicious• Flickr• Twitter• LinkedIn• Pinterest
  • What is Social Media?Social Media is people using tools (likeblogs & video) and sites (like Facebook &Twitter) to share content and haveconversationsonline.
  • The Real Value of Social Media“Is that it exponentially leverages word-of-mouth.”-John Haydon, marketing consultant johnhaydon.com (yes, that’s him.)
  • Show Me the Money? "At the end of the day, you cant think of it as afundraising tool," says Allison Fine, an expert on using social media to ignite social change. "Its a friend-raising and awareness raising tool.“ For What???
  • My how times have changed… Number of websites at the end of his first year?
  • 623
  • Number ofwebsites at theend of his firstyear?
  • 100,000,000+
  • W a tism a sfr o : h th en o yuT os V ib it, O p ru it a d o l, is ily p ot n y n Mroe B T U…
  • The Challenge…Determine what your realisticmanpower and willpower is to use social media.
  • D f it n o S cesae ein io s f u cs r C ag g h n in
  • Attributes of Success
  • D efinitions of Success
  • Developing Basic Strategy• Who is the target?• What is the message?• How can we engage?• What tools do we use?• How do we build a base?• Define Success• Delegate the Responsibility
  • Social Media: STEP by STEP• Target Your Audience: Listen First! – General listening tools • Best in class: SocialMention.com – As far as ‘free’ options go, this is a solid as it gets. • Alternatives: BoardReader.com (discussion board specific), Addictomatic.com (a general listening dashboard) and PeopleBrowsr.com (big data, big insights). – Specific listening tools • Each of the major social media platforms can be interrogated using a combination of specific tools including: FBsearch.us (Facebook), Monitter.com (location-based Twitter search), TagDef.com (Twitter hashtags), YouTube/KeywordTool (YouTube content optimization tool).
  • T re A p o r tl ag t p rp iaey
  • T re A p o r tl ag t p rp iaey
  • Step by Step: Share• Share Something: Create or share content that is valuable to your audience. – Publishing / blogging • Best in class: WordPress.com • CheckThis.com - Need a single page website in an instant? This is the tool for you. – Content discovery • Bo.lt, Trap.it, YourVersion.com and MyCube.com are all examples of content curation and discovery tools which you can tailor to suit your needs. • Imagery: Stock.xchng (the best place to find free images by keyword) and New.Pixable.com (A Pinterest-style image aggregator based on your networks and interests) • Video: en.fooooo.com (video search engine which aggregates results from all the major video platforms)
  • Step by Step: Engage & Build Community• Converse, don’t preach: What’s your message? – Not immediate: Be prepared to take time – According to Beth Kanter “Getting to the stage where supporters are truly engaged takes about 18 months and is heavy on experimentation and "reiteration.“:• Dashboards – The most widely used ones include TweetDeck.com, HootSuite.com and SproutSocial.com, but there are a bunch of other alternatives out there too. – Scheduling: BufferApp.com– A simple way to ‘pace and space’ your updates across multiple social networks.
  • Your Common Goals• Raise Awareness and Visibility• Network and Share• Raise Money• Increase Sales• Others?
  • D in tem im l o g h in a:M s efciv tosfr ot f t e o l o eYu o
  • Dazzling Data….Facebook has More than 500 million active users currently.• 50% of active users log on to Facebook in any given day• Average user has 130 friends• People spend over 700 billion minutes per month on Facebook• Average user is connected to 80 community pages, groups and events• Nearly three quarters (73%) of online teens and an equal number (72%) of young adults use social network sites. Source: Facebook.com and Pew Research Center’s Internet & American Life Project The Pew Research Center’s Internet & American Life Project
  • Why We Use Facebook….• Pro’s: • Con’s: – Post News and Events to a – Many “friends” does not place where people can equal many “supporters.” see it on a regular basis. – Facebook not a proven – Send out alerts and ask for fundraising or sales tool action without being – Confusing “fan pages” vs. annoying or clogging people’s email “inboxes” individual page vs. – “group” page. Get real-time feedback from people who care – People worry about about your cause. privacy, etc. – Build a community feeling. – Can be time consuming
  • YouTube Is HUGE!• More video content is uploaded to YouTube in a 60 day period than the three major U.S. television networks created in 60 years• average YouTube user spends between 15 and 25 minutes a day on the site• As of February 2011, YouTube has 490 million unique users worldwide per month, who rack up an estimated 92 billion page views each month.• We spend around 2.9 billion hours on YouTube in a month — over 325,000 years. And those stats are just for the main YouTube website — they don’t incorporate embedded videos or video watched on mobile devices.Source: http://mashable.com/2010/03/26/non-profits-youtube/
  • Why We Use YouTube… • Con’s:• Pro’s: – Have to purchase – Puts a “face to a technology (Flip Cam or name.” other recording device.) – Gives you a personality – May need to learn how to embed code on your – Makes the story more website. powerful – Privacy issues and – Allows for feedback copyright arise with constituents – What’s our personality?
  • Today• Twitter now has over 140 million active users — individuals who log in at least once a month — and over 400 million new tweets per day.• Tweets generally spike during a significant cultural event, and recent figures have been staggering. On March 11, the day of the Japan earthquake and tsunami, Twitter users exceeded the average daily tweets by 37 million-- thats 177 million tweets in a single day.http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2011/03/14/twitter-user-statistics_n_835581.htmlhttp://www.digitalbuzzblog.com/social-media-statistics-stats-2012-infographic/
  • Why We Use Twitter…• Pro’s: • Con’s: – Can quickly find those – Personal vs. Professional that care about your Voice. What will “be” activities and engage in online? conversations. – What’s our personality? – Twitter users proven to – Can be time consuming be more active and give and “suck you in.” more money. – Dialogue driven tool. Get feedback from community of users.
  • What’s a Blog Got to Do With it?
  • Why We Use Blogs…• Pro’s: • Con’s: – Free tool that basically lets – People moving away you set up your own from reading blogs to webpage. Can include links to other sites, etc. mediums like – Can have full access to post Facebook and Twitter. as much or as little as you – Need to post want. – Helps create a personality frequently to make for you the blog worth – Allows you to get feedback reader’s time. from people who care – Worry about negative about your work or activities. comments.
  • Others, Examples?• LinkedIn• Pintrest• Mobile/Text• Email/Event Registration (Hybrid Social Media)
  • Integrate Social Media into other marketing channels..• Print ads• Radio & TV• Brochures• Flyers• E-newsletters• Business cards & letterhead• E-mail signatures• Everything else!
  • Step by Step: Measure Success!• Define it – What was your goal? – Examples • Raise Awareness – New “Likes” on Facebook; Facebook “reach” using “Insights”; Number of new Twitter followers; number of “opens” of email newsletter; Number of “shares” via EventBrite = Trends! • Raise Money or Generate Sales – Donations through Twitter; Comments on Blog tied to customers Was it SMART?
  • Step by Step: Tools to Measure• The questions: – What do want to do? – How do we know what we’re doing is working? – Who are the people we should be reaching out to? – What is social influence based on and do we have any?• Tools – Tried & True: Google Analytics; Facebook “Likes”, Twitter Followers, Clickthroughs, etc. – Klout’s – Twylah – TwentyFeet Peer Index – SproutSocial
  • 5 Rules of Social Media1. Listen. Social Media is not about you. It’s about people’s relationships with you. Listen before you speak.
  • 5 Rules of Social Media2. Get involved. Social Media is about conversations and building relationships. It takes effort. Don’t just talk about yourself. Ask questions, engage people and link. Most of all, be inspiring.
  • 5 Rules of Social Media3. Give up control. You can’t control the conversation. If you want people to spread your message, you have to trust them. Listen. Inspire. Engage. Let go.
  • 5 Rules of Social Media4. Be honest. You can’t spin the truth with Social Media. Be open, honest and authentic in everything you say and do.
  • 5 Rules of Social Media5. Think long term. Don’t expect immediate, easily measurable results. It takes time to build trust and make connections.
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