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Woman in black cw first aid
Woman in black cw first aid
Woman in black cw first aid
Woman in black cw first aid
Woman in black cw first aid
Woman in black cw first aid
Woman in black cw first aid
Woman in black cw first aid
Woman in black cw first aid
Woman in black cw first aid
Woman in black cw first aid
Woman in black cw first aid
Woman in black cw first aid
Woman in black cw first aid
Woman in black cw first aid
Woman in black cw first aid
Woman in black cw first aid
Woman in black cw first aid
Woman in black cw first aid
Woman in black cw first aid
Woman in black cw first aid
Woman in black cw first aid
Woman in black cw first aid
Woman in black cw first aid
Woman in black cw first aid
Woman in black cw first aid
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Woman in black cw first aid

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A resource to support my IGCSE group.

A resource to support my IGCSE group.

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  • 1. What methods does Hill use? Only focus on the opening chapter How does the opening chapter of Hill’s ‘The Woman in Black’ foreshadow a story of haunting and evil? Anticipate, or lay the ground for the novel
  • 2. How does the opening chapter of Hill’s ‘The Woman in Black’ foreshadow a story of haunting and evil?How does the opening chapter set up the themes / tone of rest of the novel?
  • 3. Introduction
  • 4. In the opening chapter of ‘The Woman in Black’ Susan Hilluses certain techniques to foreshadow the story ofhaunting and evil. By ‘planting seeds’ of things tocome, some of these however are red herrings thatdisrupts the readers expectations of the book. For instancethe title of the opening chapter which is called ChristmasEve which is a time of year not usually associated with‘haunting and evil’.
  • 5. In the opening chapter of ‘The Woman in Black’ Susan Hillanticipates the novel’s central themes and establishes itsmenacing tone, while at the same time disrupting many ofour expectations. For instance the title of the openingchapter is ‘Christmas Eve’ which is a time of year notusually associated with ‘haunting and evil’ and yet shesubverts this festive celebration and presents instead achilling tale from the perspective of the first personnarrator, Arthur Kipps.
  • 6. In the opening chapter of ‘The Woman in Black’, Susan Hilldefinitely anticipates the novel’s central themes andestablishes its menacing tone. She does this, not onlythrough manipulating her choice of narrativeperspective, but also by making good use of descriptivelanguage. Furthermore, she plays with the conventions ofthe ghost story in order to disrupt our expectations;signposting that the tale we are about to read is not merelyfrivolous entertainment but something far more chilling.
  • 7. Topic sentences to reflect a developing argument
  • 8. Topic sentences to reflect a developing argumentHow does the opening chapter set up the themes / tone of rest of the novel?
  • 9. Methods Hill uses in the opening chapter to foreshadow• Narrative perspective – 1st person framed narrative• Disruption of expectations via title and/or use of intertextual reference (Dickens / M.R. James)• Withholding information / sense of the unspoken• Ridiculing the stereotypes of ghost stories• Use of pathetic fallacy• Use of setting• Lexical field of watery imagery
  • 10. The title of the opening chapter of ‘The Woman in Black’ istitled Christmas Eve, this presents a twist in the plot beforethe story has begun.In ‘The Woman in Black’ Hill uses narrative perspective tocreate suspense.In ‘The Woman in Black’ Hill uses pathetic fallacy of theweather which is a typical element of a ghost story.
  • 11. By setting the opening chapter of ‘The Woman in Black’ atthe warm, family home of Monk’s Piece it provides contrastwith the dark and cold Eel Marsh House.In the opening chapter of ‘The Woman in Black’ Hill hints atmany things.
  • 12. By setting the opening chapter of ‘The Woman in Black’ atthe warm, family home of Monk’s Piece it provides contrastwith the dark and cold Eel Marsh House.In the opening chapter of ‘The Woman in Black’ Hill hints atmany things. ?
  • 13. Methods Hill uses in the opening chapter to foreshadow• Narrative perspective – 1st person framed narrative Perhaps the most striking method Hill uses to foreshadow the novel’s haunting tone is her decision to present a first person framed narrative.
  • 14. Methods Hill uses in the opening chapter to foreshadow• Narrative perspective – 1st person framed narrative
  • 15. Methods Hill uses in the opening chapter to foreshadow• Disruption of expectations via title and/or use of intertextual reference (Dickens / M.R. James) Arguably, Hill’s choice of title for the opening chapter (‘Christmas Eve’) is another means by which she prepares the reader for the story to follow.
  • 16. Methods Hill uses in the opening chapter to foreshadow• Withholding information / sense of the unspoken
  • 17. Methods Hill uses in the opening chapter to foreshadow• Withholding information / sense of the unspoken Another means by which Hill uses the opening of her novel to foreshadow the events to come is, ironically, by withholding information which we might reasonably expect to be presented with during the exposition phase of the tale.
  • 18. Methods Hill uses in the opening chapter to foreshadow• Ridiculing the stereotypes of ghost stories
  • 19. Methods Hill uses in the opening chapter to foreshadow• Ridiculing the stereotypes of ghost storiesIt is no accident that Kipps goes out of his way to ridiculeand dismiss the conventions of the ghost story in the firstfew pages of the text; this is another means by which Hillprepares us for the chilling tale of the woman in black.
  • 20. Methods Hill uses in the opening chapter to foreshadow• Use of pathetic fallacy• Use of setting
  • 21. Methods Hill uses in the opening chapter to foreshadow• Use of pathetic fallacy• Use of settingHill’s use of setting and pathetic fallacy in ‘Christmas Eve’ isa subtle, but nonetheless effective way in which she furtheranticipates the horrors to come.
  • 22. Methods Hill uses in the opening chapter to foreshadow• Lexical field of watery imagery
  • 23. Methods Hill uses in the opening chapter to foreshadow• Lexical field of watery imageryMoreover, Hill’s use of descriptive language in the firstchapter includes the development of a lexical field whichevokes a relationship between memories andwater, anticipating the events to come at Eel Marsh Houseand its surroundings.
  • 24. Conclusion
  • 25. During the opening chapter of ‘The Woman in Black’ Hilluses numerous techniques to foreshadow a story of‘haunting and evil’. Some of these techniques are obvioussuch as pathetic fallacy of the weather which is typical ofmany ghost stories, however some are just hinted at suchas Kipps’ haunted past. The foreshadowing in the openingchapter is a way Hill adds dramatic tension and suspense inthe novel.
  • 26. It can be seen, then, that Hill employs a number of differentmethods in an effort to ensure that the opening chapter ofher novel foreshadows the events to follow. In doing so, shepays tribute to other writers of ghost stories who haveinfluenced her own work, including Dickens and James, whileat the same time, seeking to break away from the conventionsof her chosen genre. The result is a tale that wastes no timein establishing its grip on the reader; and by the time it lets usgo again, there can be little doubt that we have been in theclutches of something both ‘haunting and evil’!

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