The Importance of Being Earnest Intro.
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Like this? Share it with your network

Share
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Be the first to comment
No Downloads

Views

Total Views
3,585
On Slideshare
3,518
From Embeds
67
Number of Embeds
5

Actions

Shares
Downloads
102
Comments
0
Likes
1

Embeds 67

http://www.inksights.co.uk 28
http://www.inksights.co.uk 28
http://introf11sou.wikispaces.com 8
http://studysmart.bellerbys.com 2
https://frederick.blackboard.com 1

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
    No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. The Importance of Being Earnest
    Introduction
  • 2. sail/sale
    aloud/allowed
    alter/altar
    knight/night
    break/brake
    cell/sell
    there/they’re/their
    flour/flower
    pale/pail
    wail/whale
    waist/waste
    prince/prints
    rain/reign/rein
    weather/whether
    read/reed
    right/write
    which/witch
  • 3. Ernest / Earnest:
    Homophone: one of agroup of wordspronounced in the same way but differing in meaning or spelling or both.
  • 4. Ernest :
    Jack’s Alter ego in the city
    Jack’s imaginary younger brother
    Cecily’s fantasy fiancé
    Gwen’s love interest
    Algy’s adopted persona in Act 2
    Jack’s real name!
  • 5. Earnest:
    serious in intention, purpose, or effort; sincerely zealous: an earnest worker.
    showing depth and sincerityof feeling: earnest words; an earnest entreaty.
  • 6. The Title is the first joke!
    Earnestness can take many forms in the play, including being boring, solemn, pompous, complacent, smug, self-righteous, and having a sense of duty, all of which Wilde saw as hallmarks of the Victorian character.
  • 7. The earnestness of Victorian society impels Algernon and Jack to invent fictitious alter egos so they can escape the restrictions of decorum and decency.
    As you read the play, ask yourself who, if anyone, is ‘earnest’ (and does Wilde suggest that it IS important to be so?)!
  • 8. Analysing a Play
    Plot
    Themes
    Genre & style
    Play
    characters
    Stage craft
    Language
    Settings
    Context
  • 9. Plot (structure)
  • 10. Main Characters
  • Character Studies
    • What they say
    • 19. What they do
    • 20. What others say about them
    • 21. What others do to them
    (or in response to them)
  • 22. Relationships
  • 23.
  • 24. Settings (& staging)
  • 25.
  • 26.
  • 27.
  • 28.
  • 29.
  • 30.
  • 31. Context
  • 32. www.bbc.co.uk/history/british/victorians/
  • 33. http://www.victorianweb.org/authors/wilde/index.html
  • 34. Language (dialogue)
    "The real charm of the play, if it is to have charm, must be in the dialogue“ Wilde
  • Some of Wilde’s better known epigrams
    I never travel without my diary.One should always have something sensational to read in the train.
    The way to get rid of temptation is to yield to it.
    Education is an admirable thing,but it is as well to remember that nothing that is worth knowing can be taught.
  • 41. Anything becomes a pleasure if one does it too often.
    There is only one thing in the world worse than being talked about, and that is not being talked about.
    The only thing to do with good advice is pass it on;it is never of any use to oneself.
    The difference between literature and journalism is that journalism is unreadable and literature is not read.
  • 42. A woman begins by resisting a man's advances and ends by blocking his retreat.
    Some cause happiness wherever they go; others whenever they go.
    Life is far too important a thing ever to talk seriously about.
    Either that wallpaper goes, or I do. [His final words.]
  • 43. Stage Craft
    • Stage directions
    • 44. Director/Actor choices
    • 45. Blocking
    • 46. Set/props/lighting & costuming
    • 47. Audience reaction
  • What do you notice about this moment in the play – why has it been staged in this way?
  • 48. Genre & Style‘A Trivial Comedy for Serious People’
  • Themes
    • Lies, fantasy, deceit & morality
    • 52. Love, romance & marriage
    • 53. Respectability & social conventions
    • 54. Class & wealth
    • 55. Gender
    • 56. Foolishness & folly