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The Importance of Being Earnest<br />Introduction<br />
sail/sale<br />aloud/allowed<br />alter/altar<br />knight/night <br />break/brake <br />cell/sell <br />there/they’re/thei...
Ernest / Earnest:<br />Homophone: one of agroup of wordspronounced in the same way but differing in meaning or spelling or...
Ernest :<br />Jack’s Alter ego in the city<br />Jack’s imaginary younger brother<br />Cecily’s fantasy fiancé<br />Gwen’s ...
Earnest:<br />serious in intention, purpose, or effort; sincerely zealous: an earnest worker. <br />showing depth and sinc...
The Title is the first joke!<br />Earnestness can take many forms in the play, including being boring, solemn, pompous, co...
The earnestness of Victorian society impels Algernon and Jack to invent fictitious alter egos so they can escape the restr...
Analysing a Play<br />Plot<br />Themes<br />Genre & style <br />Play<br />characters<br />Stage craft<br />Language<br />S...
Plot (structure)<br />
Main Characters<br /><ul><li>Jack Worthing
Algernon Moncrieff
Lady Bracknell
Gwendolyn Fairfax
Cecily Cardew
Dr. Chasuble
Miss Prism
Lane
Merriman</li></li></ul><li>Character Studies<br /><ul><li>What they say
What they do
What others say about them
What others do to them </li></ul>(or in response to them)<br />
Relationships<br />
Settings (& staging)<br />
Context<br />
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The Importance of Being Earnest Intro.

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Transcript of "The Importance of Being Earnest Intro."

  1. 1. The Importance of Being Earnest<br />Introduction<br />
  2. 2. sail/sale<br />aloud/allowed<br />alter/altar<br />knight/night <br />break/brake <br />cell/sell <br />there/they’re/their<br />flour/flower <br />pale/pail <br />wail/whale<br />waist/waste<br />prince/prints <br />rain/reign/rein <br />weather/whether<br />read/reed <br />right/write <br />which/witch<br />
  3. 3. Ernest / Earnest:<br />Homophone: one of agroup of wordspronounced in the same way but differing in meaning or spelling or both.<br />
  4. 4. Ernest :<br />Jack’s Alter ego in the city<br />Jack’s imaginary younger brother<br />Cecily’s fantasy fiancé<br />Gwen’s love interest<br />Algy’s adopted persona in Act 2<br />Jack’s real name!<br />
  5. 5. Earnest:<br />serious in intention, purpose, or effort; sincerely zealous: an earnest worker. <br />showing depth and sincerityof feeling: earnest words; an earnest entreaty. <br />
  6. 6. The Title is the first joke!<br />Earnestness can take many forms in the play, including being boring, solemn, pompous, complacent, smug, self-righteous, and having a sense of duty, all of which Wilde saw as hallmarks of the Victorian character. <br />
  7. 7. The earnestness of Victorian society impels Algernon and Jack to invent fictitious alter egos so they can escape the restrictions of decorum and decency. <br />As you read the play, ask yourself who, if anyone, is ‘earnest’ (and does Wilde suggest that it IS important to be so?)!<br />
  8. 8. Analysing a Play<br />Plot<br />Themes<br />Genre & style <br />Play<br />characters<br />Stage craft<br />Language<br />Settings<br />Context<br />
  9. 9. Plot (structure)<br />
  10. 10. Main Characters<br /><ul><li>Jack Worthing
  11. 11. Algernon Moncrieff
  12. 12. Lady Bracknell
  13. 13. Gwendolyn Fairfax
  14. 14. Cecily Cardew
  15. 15. Dr. Chasuble
  16. 16. Miss Prism
  17. 17. Lane
  18. 18. Merriman</li></li></ul><li>Character Studies<br /><ul><li>What they say
  19. 19. What they do
  20. 20. What others say about them
  21. 21. What others do to them </li></ul>(or in response to them)<br />
  22. 22. Relationships<br />
  23. 23.
  24. 24. Settings (& staging)<br />
  25. 25.
  26. 26.
  27. 27.
  28. 28.
  29. 29.
  30. 30.
  31. 31. Context<br />
  32. 32. www.bbc.co.uk/history/british/victorians/<br />
  33. 33. http://www.victorianweb.org/authors/wilde/index.html<br />
  34. 34. Language (dialogue)<br />"The real charm of the play, if it is to have charm, must be in the dialogue“ Wilde<br /><ul><li>Wit
  35. 35. Wildean Epigrams
  36. 36. Inverted expectations
  37. 37. ‘Nonsense’ & paradox
  38. 38. Intertextual echoes
  39. 39. Hyperbole
  40. 40. Dramatic Irony</li></li></ul><li>Some of Wilde’s better known epigrams<br />I never travel without my diary.One should always have something sensational to read in the train. <br />The way to get rid of temptation is to yield to it.<br />Education is an admirable thing,but it is as well to remember that nothing that is worth knowing can be taught.<br />
  41. 41. Anything becomes a pleasure if one does it too often.<br />There is only one thing in the world worse than being talked about, and that is not being talked about.<br />The only thing to do with good advice is pass it on;it is never of any use to oneself. <br />The difference between literature and journalism is that journalism is unreadable and literature is not read.<br />
  42. 42. A woman begins by resisting a man's advances and ends by blocking his retreat.<br />Some cause happiness wherever they go; others whenever they go.<br />Life is far too important a thing ever to talk seriously about.<br />Either that wallpaper goes, or I do. [His final words.]<br />
  43. 43. Stage Craft<br /><ul><li>Stage directions
  44. 44. Director/Actor choices
  45. 45. Blocking
  46. 46. Set/props/lighting & costuming
  47. 47. Audience reaction</li></li></ul><li>What do you notice about this moment in the play – why has it been staged in this way?<br />
  48. 48. Genre & Style‘A Trivial Comedy for Serious People’ <br /><ul><li>Intellectual Farce
  49. 49. Comedy of Manners
  50. 50. Romantic comedy
  51. 51. Satire</li></li></ul><li>Themes<br /><ul><li>Lies, fantasy, deceit & morality
  52. 52. Love, romance & marriage
  53. 53. Respectability & social conventions
  54. 54. Class & wealth
  55. 55. Gender
  56. 56. Foolishness & folly</li>
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