Poetic Form
What is ‘form’?
Shape & stanzas          Syllables & meter




                  Form


 Punctuation                  Rhyme
The right glass for the right
           drink!
The right form for the right
    poetic expression!

                     Ballad
   Haiku




           Sonnet
Shape & stanzas          Syllables & meter




                  Form


 Punctuation                  Rhyme
Shape & Stanzas
You'll look up and down streets.
Look 'em over with care.
About some you will say,
quot;I don't choose to go there.quot;
W...
Concrete Poetry
Shape & stanzas          Syllables & meter




                  Form


 Punctuation                  Rhyme
Line Length & Syllables
•poem            1
•poetry          3
•relief          2
•recommend       3
•entertainment   4
Haiku

•Traditional Japanese form
•Present tense
•Captures a visually powerful moment
•17 syllables over 3 lines (5,7,5)
•...
The morning paper
Harbinger of good and ill
- I step over it

                     Freeway overpass-
                     ...
An old pond!
A frog jumps in –
The sound of water

                     scent of plum blossoms
                     on the...
Your Turn
Stressed & unstressed Syllables

       •POem
       •PO et ry
       •re LIEF
       •Re comm END
       •En ter TAIN ment
•Iambic - Elaine

•Trochaic - Alfred

•Dactylic - Cameron

•Anapestic – Marianne

•Spondaic - Steven
Iambic Poetry

   ‘Come live with me and be my love’
             Christopher Marlowe



‘Shall I compare thee to a summer...
Trochaic Poetry
‘With their weapons and their war-gear,
  Painted like the leaves of Autumn,
     Painted like the sky of ...
Dactylic Poetry
‘Half a league half a league,
   Half a league onward,
  All in the valley of Death
   Rode the six hundre...
Anapestic Poetry

‘There was an Old Man with a beard,
   Who said, quot;It is just as I feared!
        Two Owls and a Hen...
Spondaic Poetry
   A serious poem cannot be solely spondaic.
  It would be almost impossible to construct a
       poem en...
One foot per line: monometer
   Two feet per line : dimeter
  Three feet per line : trimeter
Four feet per line : tetramet...
Type + Number = Meter
                                                   Number of feet per line
Types of Poetic Feet
    ...
Q: If a poem had 1 foot per line, and
the foot was iambic   (1 unstressed + 1 stressed),
      what type of poem would it ...
Q: If a poem had 4 feet per line, and
the foot was trochaic   (1 stressed +1 unstressed),
      what type of poem would it...
And did those feet in ancient time
Walk upon England's mountains green?
And was the holy Lamb of God
On England's pleasant...
And DID those FEET in ANcient TIME

Walk UPon ENgland's MOUNtains GREEN?

And WAS the HOly LAMB of GOD

On ENgland's PLEAS...
Because I could not stop for Death,
He kindly stopped for me;
The carriage held but just ourselves
And Immortality.

     ...
BeCAUSE I COULD not STOP for DEATH,
he KINDly STOPPED for ME;
The CArriage HELD but JUST ourSELVES
And IMmorTAliTY.

     ...
Shape & stanzas          Syllables & meter




                  Form


 Punctuation                  Rhyme
Limerick
Sonnet
My mistress' eyes are nothing like the sun;
Coral is far more red than her lips' red;
If snow be white, why then he...
Sonnet
       My mistress' eyes are nothing like the sun;      A
           Coral is far more red than her lips' red;    B...
Shape & stanzas          Syllables & meter




                  Form


 Punctuation                  Rhyme
Enjambment & End-sopped lines
In Xanadu did Kubla Khan
A stately pleasure-dome decree :
Where Alph, the sacred river, ran
Through caverns measureless to...
License my roving hands, and let them go
Before, behind, between, above, below.
O my America! my new-found-land,
My kingdo...
Poetic Form
Poetic Form
Poetic Form
Poetic Form
Poetic Form
Poetic Form
Poetic Form
Poetic Form
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Poetic Form

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Part of an introduction to poetry unit I've used with keystage 3 students

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  • The poem 'And did those feet' by Blake inspired the poem 'did those feet' featured on 'Poetry Means Today' with Tarquin Reese-Atkinson http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z9kBaYKDq4U
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Transcript of "Poetic Form"

  1. 1. Poetic Form
  2. 2. What is ‘form’?
  3. 3. Shape & stanzas Syllables & meter Form Punctuation Rhyme
  4. 4. The right glass for the right drink!
  5. 5. The right form for the right poetic expression! Ballad Haiku Sonnet
  6. 6. Shape & stanzas Syllables & meter Form Punctuation Rhyme
  7. 7. Shape & Stanzas
  8. 8. You'll look up and down streets. Look 'em over with care. About some you will say, quot;I don't choose to go there.quot; With your head full of brains and your shoes full of feet, you're too smart to go down any not-so-good street. And you may not find any you'll want to go down. In that case, of course, you'll head straight out of town. It's opener there in the wide open air.
  9. 9. Concrete Poetry
  10. 10. Shape & stanzas Syllables & meter Form Punctuation Rhyme
  11. 11. Line Length & Syllables
  12. 12. •poem 1 •poetry 3 •relief 2 •recommend 3 •entertainment 4
  13. 13. Haiku •Traditional Japanese form •Present tense •Captures a visually powerful moment •17 syllables over 3 lines (5,7,5) •Translation can be an issue
  14. 14. The morning paper Harbinger of good and ill - I step over it Freeway overpass- Blossoms to graffiti on Fog-wrapped June mornings First Autumn morning: The mirror I stare into Shows my father’s face
  15. 15. An old pond! A frog jumps in – The sound of water scent of plum blossoms on the misty mountain path a big rising sun Spring rain - Small shells on a small beach glittering
  16. 16. Your Turn
  17. 17. Stressed & unstressed Syllables •POem •PO et ry •re LIEF •Re comm END •En ter TAIN ment
  18. 18. •Iambic - Elaine •Trochaic - Alfred •Dactylic - Cameron •Anapestic – Marianne •Spondaic - Steven
  19. 19. Iambic Poetry ‘Come live with me and be my love’ Christopher Marlowe ‘Shall I compare thee to a summer’s day?’ William Shakespeare
  20. 20. Trochaic Poetry ‘With their weapons and their war-gear, Painted like the leaves of Autumn, Painted like the sky of morning, Wildly glaring at each other; In their faces stem defiance, In their hearts the feuds of ages’ Henry Longfellow
  21. 21. Dactylic Poetry ‘Half a league half a league, Half a league onward, All in the valley of Death Rode the six hundred: 'Forward, the Light Brigade! Charge for the guns' he said: Into the valley of Death Rode the six hundred’ Alfred Tennyson
  22. 22. Anapestic Poetry ‘There was an Old Man with a beard, Who said, quot;It is just as I feared! Two Owls and a Hen, four Larks and a Wren, Have all built their nests in my beard’ Edward Lear
  23. 23. Spondaic Poetry A serious poem cannot be solely spondaic. It would be almost impossible to construct a poem entirely of stressed syllables. Therefore, the spondee usually occurs within a poem having another dominant rhythm scheme.
  24. 24. One foot per line: monometer Two feet per line : dimeter Three feet per line : trimeter Four feet per line : tetrameter Five feet per line : pentameter Six feet per line : hexameter
  25. 25. Type + Number = Meter Number of feet per line Types of Poetic Feet Monometer • Iambic (1 unstressed + 1 stressed) Dimeter • Trochaic (1 stressed + 1 unstressed) Trimeter • Anapestic(2 Tetrameter • unstressed + 1 stressed) Dactylic Pentameter • (1 stressed + 2 unstressed) Spondaic Hexameter • (all syllables equal)
  26. 26. Q: If a poem had 1 foot per line, and the foot was iambic (1 unstressed + 1 stressed), what type of poem would it be? A: Iambic monometer
  27. 27. Q: If a poem had 4 feet per line, and the foot was trochaic (1 stressed +1 unstressed), what type of poem would it be? A: Trochaic tetrameter
  28. 28. And did those feet in ancient time Walk upon England's mountains green? And was the holy Lamb of God On England's pleasant pastures seen? William Blake
  29. 29. And DID those FEET in ANcient TIME Walk UPon ENgland's MOUNtains GREEN? And WAS the HOly LAMB of GOD On ENgland's PLEASant PAStures SEEN?
  30. 30. Because I could not stop for Death, He kindly stopped for me; The carriage held but just ourselves And Immortality. Emily Dickinson
  31. 31. BeCAUSE I COULD not STOP for DEATH, he KINDly STOPPED for ME; The CArriage HELD but JUST ourSELVES And IMmorTAliTY. Emily Dickinson
  32. 32. Shape & stanzas Syllables & meter Form Punctuation Rhyme
  33. 33. Limerick
  34. 34. Sonnet My mistress' eyes are nothing like the sun; Coral is far more red than her lips' red; If snow be white, why then her breasts are dun; If hairs be wires, black wires grow on her head. I have seen roses damasked, red and white, But no such roses see I in her cheeks; And in some perfumes is there more delight Than in the breath that from my mistress reeks. I love to hear her speak, yet well I know That music hath a far more pleasing sound; I grant I never saw a goddess go; My mistress when she walks treads on the ground. And yet, by heaven, I think my love as rare As any she belied with false compare.
  35. 35. Sonnet My mistress' eyes are nothing like the sun; A Coral is far more red than her lips' red; B If snow be white, why then her breasts are dun; A If hairs be wires, black wires grow on her head. B I have seen roses damasked, red and white, C But no such roses see I in her cheeks; D And in some perfumes is there more delight C Than in the breath that from my mistress reeks. D I love to hear her speak, yet well I know E That music hath a far more pleasing sound; F I grant I never saw a goddess go; E My mistress when she walks treads on the ground. F And yet, by heaven, I think my love as rare G As any she belied with false compare. G
  36. 36. Shape & stanzas Syllables & meter Form Punctuation Rhyme
  37. 37. Enjambment & End-sopped lines
  38. 38. In Xanadu did Kubla Khan A stately pleasure-dome decree : Where Alph, the sacred river, ran Through caverns measureless to man Down to a sunless sea. Samuel Taylor Coleridge
  39. 39. License my roving hands, and let them go Before, behind, between, above, below. O my America! my new-found-land, My kingdom, safeliest when with one man manned, My mine of precious stones, my empery, How blest am I in this discovering thee! John Donne
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