Journey’S End Exam Prep

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A simple outline of the question types in the current OCR GCSE English Literature exam

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Journey’S End Exam Prep

  1. 1. Journey’s End<br />Exam preparation<br />
  2. 2. Question Format<br />You must answer 1 of 3 questions in 45 min.<br />Response to extract passage<br />Whole text focused question<br />Empathetic writing <br />
  3. 3. WARNING WARNING<br />Response to extract passage<br />Whole text focused question<br />Empathetic writing <br />
  4. 4. WARNING WARNING<br />With an empathetic response you are not given an opportunity to clearly state what you know – instead you are asked to INFER your understanding.<br />Depending on the persona you are adopting, you might be limited in terms of expression and you must adopt a convincing dialect, diction and vocabulary.<br />You can fall into ‘continuity traps’ – you may assume characters share the same insights and information afforded to the audience or you may flesh out your character with qualities and details that are not supported by the text.<br />
  5. 5. Question Format<br />You must answer 1 of 3 questions<br />Response to extract passage<br />Whole text focused question<br />Empathetic writing <br />
  6. 6. Passage based question<br />Close study of that section of the play<br />Try to relate the passage to the rest of the play<br />Character<br />Relationship between characters<br />Theme<br />Dramatic effect (atmosphere & tone)<br />Likely audience response<br />What makes this section effective / memorable<br />
  7. 7. Whole text question<br />You will be expected to find evidence from several places in the play to support your ideas<br />Character<br />Relationship between characters<br />Theme<br />Dramatic effect (atmosphere & tone)<br />Likely audience response<br />
  8. 8. Empathetic response<br />You are asked to assume the role of one of the characters in the play at a particular point in the unfolding of events.<br />You are expected to write your thoughts in the ‘voice’ of that character whilst staying true to the relationships and characteristics of the original play.<br />
  9. 9. Past Paper Questions<br />
  10. 10. June 2005<br />Passage – Opening of the play<br />Explore the way Sherriff makes this such a dramatic opening and introduces some of the main issues of the play.<br />
  11. 11. June 2005<br />Whole text - Stanhope<br />Does the way Sherriff presents Stanhope encourage you to feel differently about him at different points in the play?<br />Remember to support your ideas with details from the play.<br />
  12. 12. June 2005<br />Empathetic writing<br />You are Osborne, just before you leave the dug-out to lead the raid with Raleigh (in Act 3, Scene 1). Write your thoughts.<br />
  13. 13. June 2006<br />Passage – Ending of the play<br />Explore the ways in which Sherriff makes this a moving and dramatic ending to the play.<br />
  14. 14. June 2006<br />Whole text - Mason<br />How does Sherriff’s portrayal of Mason contribute to the dramatic impact of the play?<br />Remember to support your ideas with details from the play.<br />
  15. 15. June 2006<br />Empathetic writing<br />You are Raleigh, just after Stanhope has snatched your letter and ordered you to go and inspect your rifles (in Act Two). Write your thoughts.<br />
  16. 16. June 2007<br />Passage – Opening of Act 2<br />In what ways does Sherriff capture the audience’s interest and attention here, at the opening of Act Two?.<br />
  17. 17. June 2007<br />Whole text - Osborne<br />Hardy tells Osborne: ‘You ought to be commanding this Company.’ How far does Sherriff ‘s portrayal of Osborne convince you that Hardy is right about him?<br />
  18. 18. June 2007<br />Empathetic writing<br />You are Hibbert. Stanhope has just told you to get out after the dinner you have shared together (in Act Three, Scene Two). Write your thoughts.<br />
  19. 19. June 2008<br />Passage – Osborne & Stanhope in Act 2 Scene 1<br />Explore the ways in which Sherriff makes this such a moving and thought-provoking moment in the play.<br />
  20. 20. June 2008<br />Whole text – Osborne & Raleigh<br />How does Sherriff make the relationship between Osborne and Raleigh such a memorable part of the play?<br />Remember to support your ideas with details from the play.<br />
  21. 21. June 2008<br />Empathetic writing<br />You are Raleigh. Stanhope has just ordered you to get out after the row about dinner (in Act Three, Scene Two). Write your thoughts.<br />
  22. 22. June 2009<br />Passage – Ending of the play<br />Explore the ways in which Sherriff makes this such a dramatic and moving ending to Act Three, Scene One.<br />
  23. 23. June 2009<br />Whole text – Osborne & Stanhope<br />How does Sherriff make the relationship between Osborne and Stanhope such a memorable and important part of the play?<br />Remember to support your ideas with details from the play.<br />
  24. 24. June 2009<br />Empathetic writing<br />You are Raleigh just before you and Trotter go out on patrol for the first time (in Act One). Write your thoughts.<br />
  25. 25. Revision Strategies<br />Re-read sections of the play regularly (there is no substitute for this!)<br />Work through some of the online revision sites for additional information on characterization, relationships and themes.<br />Devise questions using the exam board templates and then plan how you might respond.<br />
  26. 26. Revision Strategies<br />Remember – the questions tend to focus on Sherriff’s technique and the ways in which he achieves a particular impact on his audience.<br />‘memorable’<br />‘moving’<br />‘effective’<br />‘dramatic impact’<br />
  27. 27. With this in mind...<br />Your revision should include a thorough examination of:<br />Stage directions & Director / Actor cues<br />Lighting & sound effects<br />Use of setting, props and costuming<br />Think of the play as an ‘experience’ rather than a text and you’ll be on the right lines<br />

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