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Holmes Introduction
Holmes Introduction
Holmes Introduction
Holmes Introduction
Holmes Introduction
Holmes Introduction
Holmes Introduction
Holmes Introduction
Holmes Introduction
Holmes Introduction
Holmes Introduction
Holmes Introduction
Holmes Introduction
Holmes Introduction
Holmes Introduction
Holmes Introduction
Holmes Introduction
Holmes Introduction
Holmes Introduction
Holmes Introduction
Holmes Introduction
Holmes Introduction
Holmes Introduction
Holmes Introduction
Holmes Introduction
Holmes Introduction
Holmes Introduction
Holmes Introduction
Holmes Introduction
Holmes Introduction
Holmes Introduction
Holmes Introduction
Holmes Introduction
Holmes Introduction
Holmes Introduction
Holmes Introduction
Holmes Introduction
Holmes Introduction
Holmes Introduction
Holmes Introduction
Holmes Introduction
Holmes Introduction
Holmes Introduction
Holmes Introduction
Holmes Introduction
Holmes Introduction
Holmes Introduction
Holmes Introduction
Holmes Introduction
Holmes Introduction
Holmes Introduction
Holmes Introduction
Holmes Introduction
Holmes Introduction
Holmes Introduction
Holmes Introduction
Holmes Introduction
Holmes Introduction
Holmes Introduction
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Holmes Introduction

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An introduction to teaching the Sherlock Holmes short stories

An introduction to teaching the Sherlock Holmes short stories

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  • 1. Pre 20 Century th Prose
  • 2. Sherlock Holmes
  • 3. What do you already know?
  • 4. author genre historical audience context
  • 5. author genre historical audience context
  • 6. Sir Arthur Conan Doyle
  • 7. •Born in Edinburgh 22nd May 1859 •Medical degree – Edinburgh University 1881 •Dr Joseph Bell – the real Holmes? •Doctor 1882-1891 •1887 ‘A Study in Scarlet’ •1890 – The Strand magazine •The Final Problem & Holmes’ resurrection! •Died in 1930 – married twice & 5 children •Letters to 221b Baker Street even today
  • 8. Doyle on Holmes and Spiritualism
  • 9. author genre historical audience context
  • 10. The genre of Detective Fiction
  • 11. The draw of Detective Fiction •The thrill of danger viewed from a safe place •The battle of good and evil with a pre-determined outcome •Working alongside the detective to solve the crime •The perfect vehicle for tension & drama
  • 12. The Ingredients of a Sherlock Holmes Story
  • 13. author genre historical audience context
  • 14. Audience
  • 15. author genre historical audience context
  • 16. Context
  • 17. The Stories
  • 18. title narrative characters voice Text structure settings mood / themes language tension
  • 19. title narrative characters voice Text structure settings mood / themes language tension
  • 20. Titles •The Engineer’s Thumb •The Five Orange Pips •The Empty House •A Case of Identity •The Adventure of the Cardboard Box
  • 21. title narrative characters voice Text structure settings mood / themes language tension
  • 22. Characters
  • 23. •Clients •Criminals •The Police force
  • 24. title Narrative characters voice Text structure settings mood / themes language tension
  • 25. Settings
  • 26. title narrative characters voice Text structure settings mood / themes language tension
  • 27. Themes •Justice •The criminal mind •The deductive method •Victorian society
  • 28. title narrative characters voice Text structure settings mood / themes language tension
  • 29. Language •Descriptive detail •Dialogue •Vocabulary
  • 30. title narrative characters voice Text structure settings mood / themes language tension
  • 31. Mood & Tension
  • 32. title narrative characters voice Text structure settings mood / themes language tension
  • 33. Order Disorder – crime committed The investigation Order restored
  • 34. Structure •Exposition •Complications •Climax •Resolution
  • 35. Exposition •Where are we? •When are we? •Who is involved?
  • 36. Complications •What is the problem? •What is the cause? •How will we build to the climax?
  • 37. Climax •How do the strands (where, who, what) combine to bring events to a head?
  • 38. Resolution •How are the strands resolved? •Do any questions remain unanswered? •Are there any loose ends?
  • 39. Structure •221B Baker Street & the Case •Holmes & Watson visit the scene •Clues & the mystery is explored •Climax – foiled crimes & arrests •Holmes explains his method
  • 40. title narrative characters voice Text structure settings mood / themes language tension
  • 41. Narrative Voice •Dr Watson •1st person perspective •Limited insight •Withheld information
  • 42. Holmes stood outside the police cell, seemingly lost in thought. Perhaps he was contemplating the fate of the criminal inside, but I knew he would not waste much time on that subject for his quick mind was always onto the new. He leaned towards me and said ‘Fried eggs for breakfast Watson?’ ‘How the devil did you know that?’ I exclaimed.
  • 43. Inside the cell the prisoner was curled up on the narrow bed, wondering what would become of him now. Holmes stood outside, apparently lost in thought. He smiled slightly and then seemed to bring himself back to reality. Suddenly he took a keen interest in the front of Watson’s coat. ‘Fried eggs for breakfast Watson?’ he said. ‘How the devil did you know that?’ the good doctor exclaimed.
  • 44. I stood outside the police cell and allowed myself a moment of self-congratulation at the thought of another cunning criminal sitting behind bars where he belonged. It was not long before my mind had leapt to another topic however, for my thoughts are always searching for a new mystery to solve. Just at that moment the mystery occupying my thoughts was the origin of that stain on Watson’s coat. I peered a little closer. It was definitely egg yolk. I leaned towards him and said, ‘Fried eggs for breakfast Watson?’ ‘How the devil did you know that?’ my good companion exclaimed.
  • 45. The Speckled Band
  • 46. A Scandal in Bohemia
  • 47. The Red Headed League
  • 48. Account for the ongoing popularity of the Sherlock Holmes stories with reference to a range of stories to illustrate your ideas. Examine the ways in which Conan Doyle establishes and builds tension in the Sherlock Holmes short stories. You should refer to a range of stories in your response.

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