E Learning Primer

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A presentation used as an initial primer. Its intention is to offer a basket of possibilities from which an informed strategic discussion can ytake place about the role e-learning might play

A presentation used as an initial primer. Its intention is to offer a basket of possibilities from which an informed strategic discussion can ytake place about the role e-learning might play

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Transcript

  • 1. Developing e-Learning Materials Johannesburg: 22 nd July 2005
  • 2. Past Reflection
    • Negatives
      • Time! training / skill acquisition
      • Initial enthusiasm decreases when the ‘reality’ hits home
      • Security – Accessibility to resource
      • ICT seen as ‘add-on’ / removed from normal teaching and learning
      • Expensive
      • Lack of Robustness
      • Portability
      • Poor use of ICTs (lacks human element)
      • Plagiarism
      • Sexist / Ageist
      • ICT people lack social skills
      • If you don’t use, you lose!
      • Reliance on the ‘Champion’
      • Not Reliable! Disk failure. Lose work!
  • 3. Past Reflection
    • Positives
      • Simulations (volcanoes)
      • Learners force teachers to learn ICT skills
      • Free MS Licenses
      • Typing exam papers (?)
      • Life is easy! / Productivity
      • Access to enormous amount of information!
      • Increases access to your intellect! Break the barriers of geography
  • 4. Key Questions
    • Does the technology suit the audience?
    • Does the technology support the material?
    • Does the technology add value?
    Shopping Basket
    • List those aspects that you ‘Like’
    • Identify what you think does not ‘Work’
    • Identify ‘your’ content that might benefit
  • 5. Computer Attributes
    • Stimulus-Response
    • Repetition
    • Re-enforcement
    • Deductive Reasoning
    • Motivation
    • ‘ Discovery learning’
    • Manipulation
    • Metacognition
    • Problem Solving
    • … impact on the way we teach?
  • 6. Styles, Methods & Techniques
    • Teaching style
    • (Behaviourist Constructivist)
  • 7. Behaviourist Methods
    • Tutorials
    • Drill and Practice
    • Simulations
    • Games
  • 8. Tutorials
    • Predetermined order
    • Student is exposed to the stimulus sequentially
    • The student is channelled through a number of stages and develops specific skills of ever increasing sophistication.
  • 9. Tutorials
      • Allows students to progress according to their ability. The individual paces the lesson.
      • Allows for both remedial and extension studies
      • These programs can track progress
      • Some tutorials can provide simple assessment
      • Not student centred. Students have very little say over content and method.
      • Not suitable for courses that require ‘thinking outside the box.’
  • 10. Drill & Practice
    • These programs allow the user to practice a skill until he has mastery
    • They offer copious examples of the exercise
    • They encourage individual users by offering remedial, normal and extension levels of difficulty
    • None or limited tutoring is provided
    • The basic principles still need to be taught by the teacher
    • Not student centred
  • 11. Simulations
    • Low cost alternative to the real thing (e.g. Flight simulators)
    • Virtual reality approximates the real world
    • Expensive
    • Lends itself to courses that require a complex yet specific skill to be learned by the user.
  • 12. Games
    • High Motivation Levels
    • Mixes both game play and serious learning
    • Fixed content
    • Students can ‘miss the point’
    • Time consuming for the amount of learning that takes place.
  • 13. Constructivist Methods
    • Scaffold
    • Collaborative Learning
    • Construct own knowledge
  • 14. Constructivism
    • Computer can provide learning scaffold
    • Base sources prepared
    • Student needs to discover information
    • Student needs to analyse information for usefulness
    • Student needs to manipulate information
    • Student needs to present and teach the information
  • 15. Techniques
    • Drag and drop
    • Multiple choice (numerous derivatives)
    • Fill in the missing word
    • Graphing tools
    • Graphic environments for simulations
    • Mouse-overs for layers
  • 16. Learner Management Systems
    • Advanced Communication tools
    • Tracking of learner progress
    • Results archive
  • 17. Learner Management System Navigation Communication tools Course Material
  • 18. LMS: Chat
  • 19. LMS: Forum
  • 20. LMS: Reports
  • 21. Key Questions
    • Does the technology suit the audience?
    • Does the technology support the material?
    • Does the technology add value?
  • 22. Possibilities?
    • LMS – ‘community of practice’
    • Video – Scenarios for discussion @ monthly meetings
    • Videos – Sexual harassment, conflict management
    • Assignments – Build PowerPoint/Web Page for assessment (Can be done at a distance)
    • CD – Materials for Reader
    • LMS – Enhance the distance learning contacts sessions
    • Use to train facilitators
    • Create electronic portfolio/journal.
    • Policy/learning – Build archive of electronic versions of policies and legislation available on support CD
    Materials?
    • School Manager – Interviews
    • Scenarios
    • Financial Skills –
    • Human Resources module simulations can be done online.
    • Simulations for new principals. Different situations
    • Immediate responses from computer
    Materials must be contextual Materials must not cut out physical contact (70% face to face vs 30% online) Portfolio evidence must be done traditionally