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United Nations Zero Draft Outcome of Third International Conference on Small Island Developing States
United Nations Zero Draft Outcome of Third International Conference on Small Island Developing States
United Nations Zero Draft Outcome of Third International Conference on Small Island Developing States
United Nations Zero Draft Outcome of Third International Conference on Small Island Developing States
United Nations Zero Draft Outcome of Third International Conference on Small Island Developing States
United Nations Zero Draft Outcome of Third International Conference on Small Island Developing States
United Nations Zero Draft Outcome of Third International Conference on Small Island Developing States
United Nations Zero Draft Outcome of Third International Conference on Small Island Developing States
United Nations Zero Draft Outcome of Third International Conference on Small Island Developing States
United Nations Zero Draft Outcome of Third International Conference on Small Island Developing States
United Nations Zero Draft Outcome of Third International Conference on Small Island Developing States
United Nations Zero Draft Outcome of Third International Conference on Small Island Developing States
United Nations Zero Draft Outcome of Third International Conference on Small Island Developing States
United Nations Zero Draft Outcome of Third International Conference on Small Island Developing States
United Nations Zero Draft Outcome of Third International Conference on Small Island Developing States
United Nations Zero Draft Outcome of Third International Conference on Small Island Developing States
United Nations Zero Draft Outcome of Third International Conference on Small Island Developing States
United Nations Zero Draft Outcome of Third International Conference on Small Island Developing States
United Nations Zero Draft Outcome of Third International Conference on Small Island Developing States
United Nations Zero Draft Outcome of Third International Conference on Small Island Developing States
United Nations Zero Draft Outcome of Third International Conference on Small Island Developing States
United Nations Zero Draft Outcome of Third International Conference on Small Island Developing States
United Nations Zero Draft Outcome of Third International Conference on Small Island Developing States
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United Nations Zero Draft Outcome of Third International Conference on Small Island Developing States

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United Nations Zero Draft Outcome of Third International Conference on Small Island Developing States

United Nations Zero Draft Outcome of Third International Conference on Small Island Developing States

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  • 1. 1 ZERO DRAFT OF THE OUTCOME OF THE THIRD INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON SMALL ISLAND DEVELOPING STATES Preamble 1. We, the Heads of State and Government and High-Level Representatives, along with Civil Society, having met in Apia, Samoa, from September 1-4, 2014, at the Third International Conference on Small Island Developing States, reaffirm our commitment to the sustainable development of small island developing States (SIDS).1 2. We reaffirm the commitments we made at United Nations conferences and summits on sustainable development: The Rio Declaration, Agenda 21, the Programme for the Further Implementation of Agenda 21, the Plan of Implementation of the World Summit on Sustainable Development (Johannesburg Plan of Implementation including chapter VII on the sustainable development of small island developing States) and the Johannesburg Declaration on Sustainable Development, the Programme of Action for the Sustainable Development of Small Island Developing States (Barbados Programme of Action-BPOA) and the Mauritius Strategy for the Further Implementation of the Programme of Action for the Sustainable Development of Small Island Developing States (MSI); and the outcome document of the United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development entitled “The future we want.” 3. We reaffirm that we continue to be guided by the purposes and principles of the Charter of the United Nations, with full respect for international law and its principles.2 4. We also reaffirm the importance of freedom, peace and security, respect for all human rights, including the right to development and the right to an adequate standard of living, including the right to food, the rule of law, gender equality, women’s empowerment and the overall commitment to just and democratic societies for development.3 5. Twenty years ago, we acknowledged that SIDS were a special case in sustainable development and agreed on a blueprint to pursue a holistic and integrated approach to sustainable development for SIDS.4 1 Composite language derived in part from The Future We Want para 1 2 The Future We Want para 7 3 The Future We Want para 8 4 Composite language derived from The Future We Want paras 178 and 180
  • 2. 2 6. In Mauritius in 2005, we developed a strategy to implement the programme of action for the sustainable development of SIDS, and here in Samoa, we acknowledge the need to advance the global effort in support of the sustainable development of SIDS.5 7. The vulnerabilities of SIDS will continue to grow unless urgent steps are taken to address our common environmental, social and economic challenges. The large range of impacts from climate change and potentially more frequent and intense natural disasters constitute unprecedented threats for SIDS.6 8. We believe the challenges faced by SIDS require approaches to development tailored to the particular circumstances of SIDS. Furthermore, we seek to bring a new sense of momentum for the sustainable development of SIDS.7 9. In today’s complex and interdependent world, partnerships of all kinds will be critical to future success. The theme of the Third International Conference on SIDS, “The sustainable development of SIDS through genuine and durable partnerships,” reflects this reality and lays a cornerstone for building a sustainable future for SIDS. Partnerships take many forms, but all should be based on mutual trust, equality, respect, transparency and accountability.8 10. We commit ourselves to act together to help the peoples of SIDS ensure that their hope for sustainable development is realized.9 11. We further commit ourselves to address SIDS’ priorities in the post-2015 development agenda, including the eradication of poverty, building resilience and improving the health and well-being of their peoples.10 Progress, Challenges and Opportunities, and Pragmatic Actions to Address Them 12. We recognize that SIDS have made significant efforts at the national and regional levels to implement the BPOA and the MSI. They have mainstreamed sustainable development principles into national development plans, policies and strategies, and undertaken political commitments to promote and raise awareness of the importance of sustainable development issues. They have also mobilized resources at the national and regional levels despite their limited resource base. SIDS have demonstrated strong leadership in calling for ambitious and urgent 5 Composite language including the Future We Want, para 180 6 Derived from The Future We Want, para 178 7 Derived from Australia written input and President of Seychelles in opening of AIMS regional meeting 8 Composite language from PrepCom. 9 Composite language including from Johannesburg Declaration paras 24 and 35 10 Composite language from PrepCom
  • 3. 3 action to address climate change, in protecting biodiversity, and in adopting strategies for promoting renewable energy.11 13. We recognize that, while the well-being of SIDS and their peoples depends first and foremost on national actions, it also depends critically on a strong partnership with the international community and on enhanced international cooperation and action to address global sustainable development challenges.12 14. We recognize there is an urgent need to strengthen cooperation and ensure genuine and durable partnerships at the national, regional and international levels to address issues related to the sustainable development of SIDS. The proposed actions outlined below will be undertaken by the international community in support of SIDS efforts.13 Sustainable Economic Development 15. SIDS have not sustained high levels of economic growth and continue to be negatively impacted by, inter alia, food insecurity, lack of adequate transport networks and other infrastructure, degradation of their coastal and marine environments, water insecurity, inadequate waste management systems, heavy debt burdens and the adverse impacts of the global economic and financial crisis.14 16. In the face of these challenges, it is vitally important to build the resilience of SIDS societies and economies and to recognize that people are the greatest natural resource of SIDS. To reach their full potential, SIDS with international support will need to invest even more in the education and training of their people. They will need to achieve higher rates of economic growth and job creation, to address high rates of unemployment (particularly of women and youth) as well as to slow migration of labour and brain drain. Sound macro-economic policies, effective and sustainable economic management, fiscal predictability, investment and regulatory certainty, and sustainable debt are also critical.15 11 Inter-regional, paras 14-16 12 EU written input 13 Composite language from PrepCom 14 Inter-regional, para 20 15 Inter-regional, paras 44, 136 and NZ written input
  • 4. 4 17. We recognize that the private sector plays an increasingly important role in achieving sustainable economic development.16 18. We agree to take the following actions: a) Support investments in formal and non-formal education, including entrepreneurial skills development, and in building and strengthening education infrastructure.17 b) Build capacity and increase the competitiveness of micro, small and medium enterprises and new social actors of SIDS economies.18 c) Support national and regional initiatives that help to increase the capacity and developmental impact of the financial services industry in SIDS.19 d) Create local jobs through public projects in the area of climate change resilience and adaptation and encourage entrepreneurs start up environment friendly enterprises, through adequate incentives.20 e) Foster private sector investment and job creation, particularly the creation of decent and green jobs.21 f) Develop innovative programs to address youth unemployment.22 g) Establish an inter- and intra-regional trade information and facilitation platform to facilitate information sharing.23 19. In particular, we note that sustainable tourism represents one important current and future driver of SIDS economic growth and job creation. As such, we agree to take the following actions:24 a) Develop policies that foster responsive, resilient and inclusive tourism. b) Support SIDS’ promotion and development of sustainable eco- and cultural tourism. c) Promote policies that allow the economy and communities to gain maximum benefits from tourism, and support the design and implementation of participatory measures to strengthen local employment and engagement in the sector, including through 16 NZ written input, Australia written input 17 Inter-regional para 44 18 Inter-regional, para 153 19 Inter-regional, para 173 20 Derived from ILO written input 21 Derived from NZ written input, Australia written input, ILO written input 22 Derived from ILO oral statement, Children and Youth MG oral statement 23 Inter-regional, para 153 24 All of para 19 derived from the Nassau Declaration of Tourism, submitted by Bahamas as a written input. (b) from Inter-regional para 47 in addition to Nassau Declaration.
  • 5. 5 partnerships and capacity development, especially in the area of statistics. d) Protect the SIDS’ natural and cultural heritage, especially their ecosystems and biodiversity. e) Take full advantage of the expertise of the Global Sustainable Tourism Council, UN World Tourism Organization (UNWTO) Global Observatories on Sustainable Tourism and the Global Partnership for Sustainable Tourism to provide direct and focused support to governments to this end. f) Encourage establishment and maintenance of governance and management structures for tourism, which bring together tourism, environment, health, disaster management, culture, transport, security and immigration, planning and development responsibilities and expertise, and enable a meaningful partnership approach between the public and private sector and local community. 20. High levels of debt threaten the sustainable development of many SIDS and, as such, we will explore a number of innovative means of addressing this problem, including25 a) Adding a criterion of vulnerability to eligibility criteria to access concessional finance of international finance institutions. b) Offering counter-cyclical lending contracts that substantially diminish debt servicing in periods of external shocks. c) Exploring debt-for-climate change adaptation and mitigation schemes.26 d) Enhancing the “smooth transition” period for SIDS that have recently graduated from Least Developed Country (LDC) status.27 Climate Change 21. We stress that climate change remains the greatest challenge to SIDS. Its adverse impacts, including resulting sea level rise and more frequent and intense natural disasters, continue to undermine progress towards development and, in the case of some SIDS, pose an existential threat.28 25 Derived from inter-regional paras 174 and 175 26 (a), (b), (c) derived from Commonwealth Secretariat written input and UNCTAD oral statement 27 Inter-regional para 176 28 Needhams Point Bridgetown Declaration, para 11
  • 6. 6 22. We acknowledge that SIDS have shown leadership in international efforts against climate change, both in calling for ambitious global mitigation targets and in undertaking innovative adaptation measures at home.29 23. We acknowledge the importance of a global effort to address both mitigation of and adaptation to climate change, recognizing that the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) is the international process overseeing this work. SIDS look in particular to the international community to advance the Warsaw international mechanism for loss and damage and to support SIDS in implementing their Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions and in meeting their adaptation needs in the short, medium and long term.30 24. In this regard, we agree to take the following actions: a) Work for an ambitious and universal agreement within the UNFCCC in 2015. b) Work through the UNFCCC to address SIDS issues, including through the provision of new and additional resources.31 c) Address the security implications of climate change, including violation of territorial integrity, more frequent and severe climate- related disasters, threats to water and food security, increased natural resource scarcity, and forced displacement and the human dimensions of climate change, including, where necessary, initiatives for preparing communities for relocation.32 d) Provide for full operationalization and capitalisation of the Green Climate Fund, with developed countries scaling-up financing to reach USD 100 billion per year by 2020.33 e) Support Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation (REDD Plus) activities, to bridge the mitigation gap, and encourage early agreement on modalities for REDD Plus results-based financing from both public and private sources.34 Sustainable Energy 29 Derived from Inter-regional paras 7 and 15 30 Inter-regional paras 60 and 66, with reference to Warsaw added after COP19 31 (a) and (b) derived from G77 oral statement 32 Inter-regional para 62 33 Inter-regional para 63 34 Inter-regional para 67
  • 7. 7 25. Energy dependence is a major source of economic vulnerability for many SIDS and has been a key challenge for many decades. At the same time, though SIDS are often considered resource poor, one source of wealth lies in their renewable energy resources.35 26. The three overall objectives of the Secretary-General’s “Sustainable Energy for All” initiative (securing access to modern energy services, increasing energy efficiency, and scaling up the use of renewable energy in energy systems) can provide a useful framework in this regard.36 27. We will work to a) Scale up financial support and investments as well as technological transfer and capacity building to develop and implement national, regional and inter-regional energy roadmaps, policies, plans and strategies, including the expansion of renewable energy.37 b) Develop a strategy and targeted measures to promote marine renewable energy as well as wind, solar and geothermal energy in SIDS.38 c) Develop a financing mechanism to support the implementation of renewable energy projects in SIDS.39 d) Encourage bold and ambitious renewable energy targets for the next decade, recognizing that SIDS’ leadership could contribute to shaping the post-2015 development agenda in this area.40 e) Enhance regional and inter-regional SIDS-SIDS cooperation for research and technological development and implementation of appropriate renewable energy and energy efficient and environmentally-sound technologies.41 f) Provide technical studies on grid stability and innovative storage mechanisms.42 Disaster risk reduction 35 Derived from FSM oral statement 36 Derived from EU written input 37 Inter-regional paras 116 and 117 38 Mauritius oral statement, FSM oral statement 39 Inter-regional para 120 40 Derived from US written input and composite language PrepCom 41 Derived from Inter-regional paras 34, 117, 121, 150 42 Inter-regional para 118
  • 8. 8 28. SIDS are disproportionately affected by natural disasters, and there is critical need to build resilience, strengthen prevention, and reduce risks in this context.43 29. We support a renewed international framework on disaster risk reduction, and we commit to44 a) Implementing the internationally agreed framework for disaster risk reduction, the Hyogo Framework for Action (HFA) 2005-2015.45 b) Support SIDS-led efforts to harmonize national reporting systems (e.g. the new generation HFA reporting, national reports on UNFCCC, and a possible reporting mechanism on future sustainable development goals) by aligning targets and indicators across agreements and instruments.46 c) Assist SIDS in establishing and strengthening catastrophic risk insurance facilities.47 d) Promote investment in early warning systems, observation equipment, pre- disaster risk reduction and post-disaster recovery, and disaster readiness education programs.48 Oceans and Seas 30. Oceans and seas, along with coastal areas, form an essential component of the Earth’s ecosystem and are intrinsically linked to sustainable development. Healthy, productive and resilient oceans are critical for poverty eradication, food security, livelihoods, and carbon sequestration, and represent an important element of identity and culture for the people of SIDS. Fisheries, coastal tourism, possible exploitation of seabed resources and potential sources of renewable energy are the building blocks of an ocean-based economy in SIDS. SIDS are custodians of vast expanses of oceans and as such they must have ownership of strategies concerning the sustainable development of oceans. Already they have shown leadership in, inter alia, advancing marine protected areas.49 43 Inter-regional para 122, combined with composite language from PrepCom inputs 44 Derived from EU oral statement 45 Inter-regional para 123 46 Derived from UNISDR written input 47 Inter-regional para 124 48 Inter-regional para 122, combined with Japan written input 49 Inter-regional paras 93 and 94, combined with CARICOM oral statement, FSM oral statement, Mauritius oral statement
  • 9. 9 31. We note that the UN Convention on the Law of the Sea (UNCLOS) provides the legal framework for the conservation and sustainable use of oceans and their resources.50 32. An integrated, holistic approach to all ocean related economic activities—both onshore and offshore—is needed to optimize economic opportunities with due regard to conservation efforts and the need to ensure coherence and balance among the three dimensions of sustainable development.51 33. With this in mind, we pledge to a) Support SIDS’ national and regional efforts to assess, conserve and sustainably manage the oceans, seas and their marine resources, including through supporting research and implementation of plans and strategies on coastal zone management and ecosystem based management, as well as enhancing the legal and institutional frameworks for licensing and exploitation of natural and mineral resources.52 b) Support the full and effective implementation of the UN Environment Program (UNEP) Regional Seas Strategy.53 c) Provide support to SIDS to address marine pollution from a number of marine and land-based sources.54 d) Take urgent action to protect coral reefs, including through the development and implementation of comprehensive and integrated approaches for their management and the enhancement of their resilience to withstand pressures, including ocean acidification, and the implementation of area-based management measures.55 e) Provide assistance to SIDS in undertaking marine scientific research and developing their technological capacity, including through the establishment of dedicated regional oceanographic centers, the provision of technical assistance for submissions to the Commission on the Limits of the Continental Shelf and the support of marine scientific research in the sea bed area beyond national jurisdiction.56 f) Support SIDS in enhancing and implementing the regime for monitoring, control and surveillance of fishing vessels, to effectively prevent, deter 50 From The Future We Want, para 158 51 Derived from Mauritius oral statement, UNESCO written input 52 Inter-regional paras 98 and 103, combined with Mauritius input 53 Inter-regional para 97 54 Inter-regional para 97, CARICOM oral statement 55 Inter-regional paras 101, 109, 110 56 Inter-regional paras 94, 105, 106, 111
  • 10. 10 and eliminate illegal, unreported and unregulated (IUU) fishing, including by investing in institutional capacity at the national, regional and international levels.57 g) Call on the UN system and regional fisheries bodies to give increased attention to the value of small-scale fisheries.58 Food Security 34. SIDS, being primarily net food importing countries, are exceptionally vulnerable to availability and price volatility of food imports. It is therefore important to ensure food security, eradicate hunger, and provide sustainable livelihoods while conserving land, water, plant and animal genetic resources, biodiversity and ecosystems. We stress the crucial role of healthy marine ecosystems, sustainable fisheries, and sustainable aquaculture for food security and nutrition and in providing for the livelihoods of the people of the SIDS.59 35. In this regard, we agree to a) Promote more sustainable agriculture, fisheries and aquaculture to improve food security.60 b) Enhance international cooperation to dampen global food price volatility.61 c) Enhance SIDS agriculture and fisheries’ resilience to climate change and natural disasters (see dedicated sections).62 d) Call on the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) to facilitate a special meeting on food and nutrition security in SIDS in order to develop an action program to address these challenges facing SIDS.63 e) Support through technical cooperation SIDS efforts to maintain natural ecological processes that support food production systems.64 Water65 36. Small islands face numerous challenges with respect to freshwater resources, including pollution, saline intrusion, soil erosion and waste water. Changes in 57 Inter-regional para 100 58 Barbados oral statement 59 Inter-regional paras 88 and 92 60 Inter-regional para 92 61 Inter-regional para 88 62 Inter-regional para 89 63 Inter-regional para 90 64 Inter-regional para 92 65 Subheading introduced based on PrepCom inputs
  • 11. 11 rainfall patterns due to climate change have a huge impact on water availability and quality.66 37. In this regard, we agree to a. Support the development of institutional and human capacities involved in water conservation.67 b. Support provision of adequate facilities and infrastructure, both built and natural, for safe drinking water and sanitation systems. c. Facilitate the expansion of wastewater treatment, recycling and reuse, and support improved water-use efficiency. d. Support SIDS in enhancing effective water governance.68 Sustainable Transport69 38. We note that transportation and mobility are central to sustainable development. Sustainable transportation can enhance economic growth and improve accessibility. Sustainable transport achieves better integration of the economy while respecting the environment. We recognize the importance of the efficient movement of people and goods, and the potential of sustainable transport to improve social equity, health, resilience of cities, urban-rural linkages and productivity of rural areas.70 39. In this regard, we agree to a. Promote access to environmentally sound, safe and affordable transportation.71 b. Support initiatives to advance road safety.72 c. Support SIDS in developing viable regional transportation arrangements, including improved air, land and sea transport policies.73 Sustainable Consumption and Production 40. Promoting sustainable patterns of consumption and production is one of the three overarching objectives of, and essential requirements for, sustainable 66 Inter-regional para 20, Maldives oral statement, 67 UNESCO written input 68 (b), (c), (d) composite language from MSI para 37, The Future We Want para 124, and discussions in the Open Working Group on SDGs. 69 Subheading introduced based on PrepCom statements and inter-regional negotiations 70 From The Future We Want para 132 71 The Future We Want para 132 72 The Future We Want para 132 73 MSI para 56
  • 12. 12 development. It is recognized that while developed countries should take the lead in establishing sustainable consumption and production (SCP) patterns, SCP is important for all countries including SIDS with their limited resource base. 74 41. In this regard, we commit to a) Establish a SIDS specific support platform within the 10 Year Framework of Programmes on SCP (10YFP) with emphasis on small and medium enterprises, sustainable tourism, sustainable lifestyles and education for sustainable development.75 b) Provide support to additional programmes under the 10YFP to advance sustainable waste management and sustainable food systems, including food security.76 Management of chemicals and waste, including hazardous waste 42. We recognize that the sound management of chemicals and waste is crucial for the protection of human health and the environment. For SIDS, as for all countries, sound waste management is also crucial for a healthy environment, and the small land area of many SIDS poses particular challenges for safe waste disposal.77 43. To support SIDS in their sound chemicals and waste management efforts, we pledge to a) Establish technical cooperation programmes to enable the creation and the strengthening of national, regional and international mechanisms for the management of wastes, including chemical and hazardous waste, as well as ship-generated waste, and develop oil spill contingency plans.78 b) Support SIDS’ efforts to implement the Globally Harmonized System of the Classification and Labeling of Chemicals (GHS).79 c) Increase assistance to SIDS to take advantage of existing capacity programs like those under the World Health Organization’s (WHO) International Health Regulations (IHR), which call for strengthened management of specific risks including control programs for chemical and other toxic and environmental events.80 74 Inter-regional paras 126 and 127, combined with Jamaica and Tuvalu oral statements, which referred to SIDS limited resources 75 Inter-regional para 128 76 Inter-regional para 128 77 Derived from The Future We Want paras 213-215 and Tonga oral statement 78 Inter-regional para 69 79 Inter-regional para 73 80 Inter-regional para 72
  • 13. 13 d) Help build capacity for implementing “reduce, reuse, recycle and recover” approaches, especially through the transfer of environmentally appropriate technologies.81 e) Establish special protected zones, where appropriate, to restrict the passage of ships carrying nuclear waste and radioactive materials, through international cooperation.82 f) Renew international efforts to clean up oil reserves and residues and hazardous materials and explosives left over from ships sunk during the Second World War.83 Health and NCDs 44. We recognize that communicable diseases such as HIV/AIDS, malaria, tuberculosis, and influenza, as well as non-communicable diseases (NCDs) continue to present serious challenges to the sustainable development efforts of SIDS. Indeed, the burden and threat of NCDs constitute one of the major challenges for SIDS in the twenty-first century.84 45. In this regard, we agree to work with SIDS to a) Develop and implement comprehensive, whole-of-government multi- sector policies and strategies for the management of NCDs, including through education and public awareness, strengthening of health systems, food and nutrition, trade and sports.85 b) Explore with utmost urgency establishing a ten-year target for reversing the spread of NCDs and obesity.86 c) Develop a mechanism to enable SIDS-SIDS cooperation for NCDs, using existing international fora to have biennial meetings of SIDS ministers of health and appropriate non-health sectors.87 d) Call upon WHO and other stakeholders to assist in the development of specific national programs and policies geared towards children’s health.88 Social Development 81 Derived from Japan oral statement 82 Inter-regional para 74 83 Inter-regional para 75 84 Inter-regional outcome para 43, 52 85 Inter-regional para 84, NZ written input 86 US written input 87 Inter-regional para 87 88 Inter-regional para 53
  • 14. 14 GENDER EQUALITY AND WOMEN’S EMPOWERMENT 89 46. Empowerment of women and girls has a transformative and multiplier effect on development activities and gains. Women can be powerful agents of change.90 47. We commit to a) Support SIDS’ efforts to integrate gender perspectives in priority areas for sustainable development.91 b) Support SIDS efforts to strengthen women’s economic empowerment and employment, end violence against women, increase participation and leadership in national legislative bodies, and improve access to good quality education and health, including maternal health services.92 c) Tackle the structural inequalities and multiple discriminations that affect women and girls and hinder progress and slow development gains. d) Guarantee women’s equal access to and control over productive resources and assets, including land, as well as access to finance and technology.93 LOCAL AND TRADITIONAL KNOWLEDGE AND CULTURE AND SPORT 48. SIDS possess a wealth of culture, which is an enabler for sustainable development. In particular, indigenous bio-cultural heritage recognizes the deep connections among people, culture, knowledge and the natural environment, and can meaningfully advance sustainable development.94 49. Measures to protect and preserve the natural, tangible and intangible cultural heritage practices and traditional knowledge of SIDS have been inadequate, and efforts capitalizing on SIDS strong capacity in sport can be enhanced. We will therefore seek to95 a) Increase resources for the development and strengthening of national and regional cultural activities including through the UN Education, Science and Culture Organization’s (UNESCO) networks of sites, such as the World Heritage sites, which reinforce local capacities and promote awareness in SIDS.96 89 Sub-sub headings inserted for added clarity 90 Inter-regional para 76 91 Derived from UN Women written input 92 NZ written input 93 (c) and (d) derived from UN Women written input and Women’s Major Group oral statement 94 Inter-regional outcome para 77 95 Inter-regional outcome para 46 and composite language from PrepCom 96 Inter-regional para 77 and UNESCO written input
  • 15. 15 b) Encourage the development of creative industries and creative tourism that capitalize on the rich capacity of SIDS in music, performance and art.97 c) Advance the use of sport as a vehicle to foster development, strengthen education and promote health in SIDS.98 PROMOTING PEACEFUL SOCIETIES 50. The sustainable development of SIDS is negatively impacted by crime and violence, including conflict, gang and youth violence, piracy and transnational organized crime. In particular, the lack of sustainable livelihoods and opportunities for further education, and the breaking down of community support structures, can lead to an increasing number of young men and young women involved in violence and crime.99 51. In this regard, we commit to a) Combat human trafficking and transnational organized crime. b) Support SIDS efforts to provide employment opportunities for young people, including in creative and cultural industries.100 Biodiversity 52. SIDS possess an extraordinary level of marine and terrestrial biodiversity, and in many cases this is fundamental to their livelihoods and identity.101 53. Noting that this valuable biodiversity is at grave risk, we pledge to a) Provide additional support to SIDS to facilitate their ratification of the Nagoya Protocol on Access and Benefit Sharing under the Convention on Biological Diversity, including by appropriate access to genetic resources and the transfer of appropriate technologies, taking into account the rights of SIDS over their own resources and technologies.102 b) Support SIDS in reducing the negative impacts of genetically modified organisms on biodiversity.103 c) Establish a global network of area-based management measures to reduce the rate of biodiversity loss in the marine environment.104 97 UNESCO written input 98 From A/RES/67/17 99 Inter-regional para 49, UNESCO written input 100 (a) and (b) from Inter-regional para 49, UNESCO written input 101 Composite language from PrepCom 102 Inter-regional para 113 103 Inter-regional para 114 104 Inter-regional para 101
  • 16. 16 d) Promote opportunities for SIDS exports of sustainably produced organic, natural and biodiversity-based products.105 Forests 54. Forests are vital to SIDS livelihoods and ecosystems, and as such, we pledge to support SIDS to106 a) Implement the non-legally binding instruments on all types of forests. b) Advance efforts to effectively slow, halt and reverse deforestation and forest degradation, including, inter alia, by promoting trade in legally harvested forest products. c) Enhance efforts to achieve reforestation, restoration and afforestation. d) Access financing to support national sustainable forest management. 107 Partnerships 55. Some of the issues outlined above have emerged with new intensity in recent years; others are structural challenges that have beleaguered SIDS for decades. But all are urgent, and all require swift and pragmatic action by a range of actors at the local, national, regional and international levels, including through effective, inclusive and accountable partnerships owned and driven by SIDS and responsive to their priorities.108 56. We reaffirm that empowered, genuine and durable partnerships are based upon mutual trust, equality, respect, accountability and transparency. They are anchored in national ownership and require political will to undertake and implement long-term, predictable commitments. Partnerships in all their forms should be utilized, enhanced and strengthened to ensure meaningful engagement of various actors (including local authorities, civil society and NGOs, foundations, private sector, international financial institutions (IFIs)) and achieve the SIDS vision of self-reliance.109 57. SIDS have successfully mobilized partnerships and cooperation arrangements to advance their sustainable development. These include North-South, SIDS-SIDS partnerships, and increased South-South and triangular cooperation, as well as cooperation programmes implemented at intra- and interregional levels.110 105 Derived from ITC written input 106 Composite language from PrepCom 107 (a), (b), (c), (d) from Inter-regional para 115 108 Composite language from PrepCom 109 Inter-regional para 57, with EU written statement 110 Inter-regional para 18, with India, China, Brazil, Singapore oral statements
  • 17. 17 58. Keeping in mind the theme of the Third International Conference on SIDS, we must a) Strengthen cooperation and ensure genuine and durable partnerships at the national, regional and international levels to address issues related to SIDS sustainable development needs.111 b) Develop a partnerships framework or mechanism to allow SIDS to work collaboratively among themselves and with other stakeholders in identifying new opportunities for growth, development and innovation. The partnership framework should be people-centred and focus on SIDS priority issues, in line with national policies. It should provide for monitoring of pledges and commitments by partnerships in order to ensure their full implementation and effectiveness. This mechanism should also provide the necessary impetus to pursue the unfinished business of the BPOA and MSI.112 Enabling Factors 59. We acknowledge the primary responsibility of SIDS for their own development in the framework of the global partnership for development and underline that mutual accountability is a key aspect. Nevertheless, SIDS need support of the international community and in this regard we commit to help SIDS pursue their own sustainable development.113 Financing 60. Finance from all sources, domestic and international, public and private, as well as technology development and transfer, capacity building, and enabling institutional and policy environments at all levels are critically important means of advancing sustainable development everywhere, including in SIDS.114 61. SIDS will continue to require a range of financing mechanisms to implement their sustainable development agendas, including actions called for in BPOA, MSI and the outcome of the Samoa Conference.115 62. In this regard, we will work to a) Facilitate the access of SIDS to concessionary sources of financing.116 111 Inter-regional para 58 112 Jamaica oral statement, Barbados oral statement 113 Inter-regional para 28, EU written input 114 Composite language from Inter-regional paras 129, 138; The Future We Want para 254; and PrepCom 115 Inter-regional para 133 116 Inter-regional para 133
  • 18. 18 b) Develop alternative measurements for assessing the progress made in the sustainable development of SIDS, going beyond gross domestic product (GDP) or gross national income (GNI) and taking into account the special circumstances, vulnerabilities and low resilience of SIDS.117 c) Further develop international access arrangements or modalities that allow developing countries, particularly SIDS, direct access to financing for sustainable development, including for climate and environmental financing.118 d) Simplify application procedures to facilitate SIDS access to existing funds, and enhance capacity-building efforts in this regard.119 e) Provide sufficient, additional and predictable financial resources to SIDS to facilitate the implementation of climate change adaptation and mitigation projects.120 f) Prioritize the full operationalization and capitalization of the Green Climate Fund.121 Trade 63. Given the vulnerability of SIDS, including their small size, limited negotiating capacity and remoteness from markets, efforts are needed to support their further integration in world markets. With this in mind, we commit to122 a. Encourage the recognition of the special circumstances of SIDS in various trade and economic agreements and the extension of trade preferences to SIDS as they address global challenges on their paths towards economic growth and development.123 b. Support technical assistance through Aid for Trade and other programmes to strengthen SIDS capacity to effectively participate in the multilateral trading system, including understanding trade rules and disciplines, negotiating and implementing trade agreements, and formulating and administering coherent trade policies.124 c. Support SIDS in assessing the implications of and mitigating the impact of non-tariff barriers for their market access opportunities.125 d. Develop and strengthen partnerships, such as those undertaken by the UN Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD) in collaboration with the International Trade Centre (ITC) and other organizations, to enhance 117 Inter-regional para 41,175, composite language from PrepCom 118 Inter-regional para 132 119 Inter-regional para 26 120 Inter-regional para 26 121 Inter-regional para 63 122 Inter-regional para 166, with composite language from PrepCom 123 Inter-regional para 171 124 Inter-regional para 167 125 Inter-regional para 168
  • 19. 19 SIDS participation in the international trade in goods and services, build their productive capacities and address their supply-side constraints.126 Capacity Building 64. We affirm the importance of investments in education and other training programs to develop the human capacity and human resources of SIDS in order to build the resilience of SIDS societies and economies. Also critical is to develop SIDS institutional capacity.127 65. In this regard, we pledge to a) Support a coordinated and coherent UN system-wide capacity initiative for SIDS through UN Country Teams in collaboration with regional commissions and regional intergovernmental organizations to enhance national capacities and institutions, building on the lessons and successes of Capacity 2015.128 b) Enhance efforts to strengthen national institutions of SIDS. c) Ensure that capacity building is part of all cooperation frameworks and partnerships and integrated in the priorities and work programmes of all UN agencies providing assistance to SIDS. d) Encourage the use of country systems and retain knowledge in all its forms, including traditional knowledge, within a country. 129 e) Ensure accountability and transparency in all capacity building efforts.130 f) Support a dedicated SIDS Intensive Training for Sustainable Development Programme, located in the University Consortium of Small Island States (UCSIS), as well as a regional Annual Training Course on the UN Systems with emphasis on SIDS issues.131 g) Support establishment of a SIDS interregional technical cooperation agreement, which will allow for the further strengthening of the SIDS Technical Assistance Program (SIDS TAP), and the exchange of technical expertise and information on sustainable development priority areas for SIDS.132 Technology transfer 126 Inter-regional para 170 127 Inter-regional para 134, 136, 138 128 Inter-regional para 134 129 (b), (c), (d) Inter-regional para 138 130 Cook Islands oral statement 131 Inter-regional para 139 132 Inter-regional para 154
  • 20. 20 66. Access to technology plays a crucial role in sustainable development. The transfer of technology appropriate to SIDS is critical to complement the national efforts of SIDS in promoting environmentally sound technology development.133 67. In this regard, we agree to a) Support the promotion, facilitation and financing, as appropriate, and the development, transfer and diffusion of affordable, SIDS-adapted and environmentally sound technologies and the corresponding know-how to the SIDS.134 b) Increase connectivity and the use of information and communication technologies (ICTs) in SIDS, including through greater cooperation, training, and national legislation.135 Data Collection and Management 68. A data revolution is required in SIDS to enable effective follow up and evaluation of implementation, and to track success in attaining the internationally agreed development goals.136 69. In this regard, we decide to a) Strengthen data systems, including by launching new partnership initiatives or scaling up existing initiatives. b) Ensure continued ownership of data by SIDS governments.137 c) Establish national and regional information and communication technology platforms and information dissemination hubs in SIDS to facilitate information exchange and SIDS-SIDS cooperation, building on existing information and communication platforms, as appropriate.138 d) Call on the UN Statistics Division, UNEP and other relevant UN agencies and intergovernmental organizations to support the establishment of a SIDS Sustainable Development Statistics and Information Programme with emphasis on upgrading national statistical systems and mainstreaming sustainable data collection and analysis.139 Institutional support to SIDS 133 Inter-regional paras 34, 140, composite language from PrepCom 134 Inter-regional para 140 135 Inter-regional para 56 136 Inter-regional para 143 137 (a) and (b) Inter-regional para 144 138 Inter-regional para 149 139 Inter-regional para 146
  • 21. 21 70. The United Nations system, international and regional financial institutions and other multilateral development partners need to continue and strengthen support for SIDS in their efforts to implement national sustainable development strategies and programs, and ensure that their priorities are incorporated in the work of these institutions.140 71. In this regard we resolve to a) Streamline and bolster UN system support to SIDS, as called for in UN resolution A/Res/65/2.141 b) Ensure that UN entities fully take into account SIDS issues and include support to SIDS and development of SIDS capacities in their programmes at different levels.142 c) Support national and regional initiatives that serve to enhance the voice and participation of SIDS in the decision making and norm setting processes of IFIs.143 d) Build institutional mechanisms in the three SIDS regions to facilitate inter- and intra-regional cooperation and collaboration among SIDS.144 e) Include SIDS issues in the agenda of the high level political forum for sustainable development (HLPF) and reformed Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC) and ensure that they make appropriate linkages to national and regional implementation mechanisms.145 f) Ensure that the Committee for Development Policy (CDP) of ECOSOC gives due consideration to the vulnerability of SIDS particularly when assessing their categorization as LDCs.146 g) Request UN development entities to incorporate SIDS related activities into their relevant strategic and programmatic frameworks, including the UN Development Assistance Framework (UNDAF).147 Priorities for the post-2015 development agenda 72. We affirm that the post-2015 development agenda should include the priorities of SIDS, given their unique and persistent structural vulnerabilities, the fact that they remain a special case for sustainable development, and the need for global cooperation and partnership to build their resilience.148 140 Inter-regional para 156 141 Barbados oral statement and from Inter-regional paras 158 and 159 142 Inter-regional paras 159 and 160 143 Inter-regional para 172 144 Barbados oral statement 145 Inter-regional para 160 146 Inter-regional para 165 147 Inter-regional para 159 148 Inter-regional para 180
  • 22. 22 73. We affirm that the priorities for SIDS in the design of the post-2015 development agenda should build on the outcome of the Samoa Conference.149 74. We therefore call for a post-2015 development agenda that a) Places people-centred sustainable development at its core and focuses on eradicating poverty, engendering social equality, and achieving environmental sustainability.150 b) Ensures commitment to build resilience among SIDS.151 c) Takes into consideration the need for the full implementation of the BPOA, MSI and the outcome of the Samoa Conference.152 d) Establishes oceans as a thematic priority, including through consideration of a stand-alone sustainable development goal on oceans and seas, including targets on achieving a healthy marine environment, achieving healthy fish stocks, and realizing the economic benefits of sustainable development of marine resources.153 e) Includes climate change as a cross-cutting issue in the elaboration of sustainable development goals, in accordance with the principle of common but differentiated responsibilities and respective capabilities.154 f) Gives a prominent place to promoting gender equality and women’s empowerment, including freedom from violence for women and girls, and includes gender equality as a cross-cutting issue across all goals.155 g) Features health issues prominently and addresses the emerging health crisis represented by non-communicable diseases.156 h) Accelerates the shift toward patterns of sustainable consumption and production, including through the 10YFP and the SIDS-specific support platform it contains.157 i) Recognizes that the need for food and water security as well as the necessity of economic and social development must be balanced with the need to conserve ecosystems and preserve biodiversity.158 j) Calls for a “New Global Partnership” which harnesses the full potential of partnerships between governments at all levels, businesses, civil society, and a wide range of other stakeholders, complementing the traditional approaches to action, such as Official Development Assistance (ODA) and foreign aid.159 149 Inter-regional para 177 150 Inter-regional para 181 151 Inter-regional para 180 152 Inter-regional para 178 153 Inter-regional para 189 154 Inter-regional para 188 155 Inter-regional paras 42 and 76 156 Inter-regional para 183 157 Inter-regional para 184 158 Inter-regional para 182 159 Composite language including from PrepCom and Inter-regional para 10
  • 23. 23 k) Establishes a robust global monitoring system that strengthens accountability at all levels and ensures adequate and timely analysis of implementation, and includes, where appropriate, clear targets and indicators that are relevant and meaningful to SIDS.160 Monitoring and Accountability 75. The commitments and actions above must be rigorously pursued if they are to translate into lasting sustainable development for SIDS. Results must be monitored and assessed, and they should be specific, measurable, achievable, relevant and time-bound. The United Nations bodies, including the General Assembly and its subsidiary bodies, ECOSOC and its subsidiary bodies, and the HLPF will be appropriate for this monitoring. Regional Commissions, as appropriate, should provide for enhanced engagement and regional monitoring frameworks for SIDS.161 76. In this regard, we agree to162 a) Ensure that the HLPF shall devote adequate time to the discussion of the sustainable development challenges facing SIDS, with the aim of enhancing engagement and implementing commitments. b) Invite the Secretary-General to provide regular reporting, through the annual mechanisms of the General Assembly, ECOSOC and the HLPF on progress on SIDS-related commitments, partnerships and other activities. c) Request the Department of Economic and Social Affairs (DESA) to maintain a SIDS-focused partnerships platform as well as a registry of voluntary commitments and projects. 160 Inter-regional para 186 161 Composite language from PrepCom 162 (a), (b), and (c) from composite language from PrepCom and discussions of HLPF and Rio+20 follow up

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