Sustainable
Campuses
Building Green at Minority-Serving Institutions
Dear Colleagues:
Welcome to Sustainable Campuses: Building Green at Minority-Serving
Institutions, a resource developed by...
Table of Contents
Chapter 1

Campus Leadership
sustainable campuses

Building Green at
Minority-Serving
Institutions
Edito...
Table of Contents cont.
Chapter 2

Finances

Bridging the Gap Between Higher Education and
Community Engagement___________...
Chapter 3

Facilities
Greening from the Inside-Out:
How Sustainability Can Transform Your Campus _____________ 78
By Jaime...
Chapter

Campus
leadership
Minority-serving colleges and universities
are actively creating a culture of sustainability
ac...
chapter 1

CAMPUS Leadership | White Paper

UNCF Building Green
at Minority-Serving
Institutions
UNCF has joined with a br...
Campus-wide sustainability requires a major
paradigm shift deconstructing well-defined
disciplinary silos and moving beyon...
chapter 1

CAMPUS Leadership | White Paper

UNCF teamed with the Sustainable Endowments
Institute to conduct a sustainabil...
and Comverge have supported the program along
with Woodline Solutions, Integral Group, Herman
Russell, Lancaster Craig and...
chapter 1

CAMPUS Leadership | White Paper

Education for
Sustainability Blueprint
Even with colleges and universities com...
action. While there are few hard metrics and no
comprehensive national assessment of the state
of sustainability in higher...
chapter 1

CAMPUS Leadership | White Paper

2.	Increase faculty and staff resources
To reach a sufficient percentage of th...
required to support the work that happens between
our organizations, as well as that of our individual
organizations, most...
chapter 1
White Paper

•	 Facilities and Operations 	
•	 Messaging and Outreach 	
•	 Diversity 	
•	 Network Building 	
•	 ...
About the Author
Georges Dyer joined Second Nature at the beginning of 2007 as vice president
of programs. His work has fo...
chapter 1

CAMPUS Leadership | Case Study

Organizing for a
Successful Green Initiative:
Wilberforce University
Ohio’s Wil...
committee aims to positively change behaviors of
university constituents relative to all items being
used and/or consumed....
CAMPUSES DEMAND MILLIONS OF GALLONS OF WATER EVERY YEAR,
and “drinking” water is used to meet all of these needs, even in ...
Introducing BlueHouse:

TM

a better way to treat and reuse water
BlueHouse is a water treatment and reclamation system th...
chapter 1

CAMPUS Leadership | White Paper

Green For All
Ambassadors: Working
to Build a Green Future
The Green For All A...
Today, these institutions are educating the leaders of
the future, and Green For All is proud to be working
with them thro...
chapter 1

CAMPUS Leadership | White Paper

Jomar Floyd, Florida AM University
As a senior at Florida Agricultural and Mec...
students were so attentive, and they enjoyed the step

some important contacts that will help our school

forward/step bac...
chapter 1

CAMPUS Leadership | White Paper

Greening
Howard University
Howard University’s renewable energy and recycling ...
The first step was to identify opportunities for saving
energy across the campus. These opportunities
were used to establi...
chapter 1

CAMPUS Leadership | White Paper

Visions of
Sustainability in 2050
The promise of a sustainable future can be f...
principles of sustainability. In short, a sustainability
perspective must become second nature to us all.
Without a divers...
chapter 1

CAMPUS Leadership | White Paper

•	
Strong, healthy, culturally diverse and
environmentally sustainable local c...
International governance has been reformed:
•	 World Trade Organization:
	

–	
Shows greater respect for health and
enviro...
chapter 1

CAMPUS Leadership | White Paper

Sustainable Spelman
A selection from a convocation speech given on August 26, ...
the global impact of our environmental choices? How
can we foster ethical leadership without educating
our students about ...
chapter 1

CAMPUS Leadership | White Paper

that address the climate challenge by reducing global
warming emissions and by...
About the Author
Dr. Beverly Daniel Tatum has served as president of Spelman College since 2002.
Her tenure as president h...
chapter 1

CAMPUS Leadership | White Paper

The People Side
of Performance
Contracting
Leverage the interaction between pe...
of the campus for future generations while reducing
its environmental footprint. While some may stop
at building retrofits...
chapter 1

CAMPUS Leadership | White Paper

the building occupants. Changing the behavior of

effectiveness in each iterat...
raph 1
G
Comparison of metered electricity usage before ECTBC
implementation and after ECTBC implementation
(presented in ...
chapter 1

CAMPUS Leadership | White Paper


“ n summary, considering
I
the people element of energy
efficiency and struct...
chapter 1

CAMPUS Leadership | White Paper

Using SustainabilityFocused Learning
on Higher-Education
Campuses to Benefit O...
Sustainable_Campuses Building Green at Minority-Serving Institutions Kresge Foundation UNCF
Sustainable_Campuses Building Green at Minority-Serving Institutions Kresge Foundation UNCF
Sustainable_Campuses Building Green at Minority-Serving Institutions Kresge Foundation UNCF
Sustainable_Campuses Building Green at Minority-Serving Institutions Kresge Foundation UNCF
Sustainable_Campuses Building Green at Minority-Serving Institutions Kresge Foundation UNCF
Sustainable_Campuses Building Green at Minority-Serving Institutions Kresge Foundation UNCF
Sustainable_Campuses Building Green at Minority-Serving Institutions Kresge Foundation UNCF
Sustainable_Campuses Building Green at Minority-Serving Institutions Kresge Foundation UNCF
Sustainable_Campuses Building Green at Minority-Serving Institutions Kresge Foundation UNCF
Sustainable_Campuses Building Green at Minority-Serving Institutions Kresge Foundation UNCF
Sustainable_Campuses Building Green at Minority-Serving Institutions Kresge Foundation UNCF
Sustainable_Campuses Building Green at Minority-Serving Institutions Kresge Foundation UNCF
Sustainable_Campuses Building Green at Minority-Serving Institutions Kresge Foundation UNCF
Sustainable_Campuses Building Green at Minority-Serving Institutions Kresge Foundation UNCF
Sustainable_Campuses Building Green at Minority-Serving Institutions Kresge Foundation UNCF
Sustainable_Campuses Building Green at Minority-Serving Institutions Kresge Foundation UNCF
Sustainable_Campuses Building Green at Minority-Serving Institutions Kresge Foundation UNCF
Sustainable_Campuses Building Green at Minority-Serving Institutions Kresge Foundation UNCF
Sustainable_Campuses Building Green at Minority-Serving Institutions Kresge Foundation UNCF
Sustainable_Campuses Building Green at Minority-Serving Institutions Kresge Foundation UNCF
Sustainable_Campuses Building Green at Minority-Serving Institutions Kresge Foundation UNCF
Sustainable_Campuses Building Green at Minority-Serving Institutions Kresge Foundation UNCF
Sustainable_Campuses Building Green at Minority-Serving Institutions Kresge Foundation UNCF
Sustainable_Campuses Building Green at Minority-Serving Institutions Kresge Foundation UNCF
Sustainable_Campuses Building Green at Minority-Serving Institutions Kresge Foundation UNCF
Sustainable_Campuses Building Green at Minority-Serving Institutions Kresge Foundation UNCF
Sustainable_Campuses Building Green at Minority-Serving Institutions Kresge Foundation UNCF
Sustainable_Campuses Building Green at Minority-Serving Institutions Kresge Foundation UNCF
Sustainable_Campuses Building Green at Minority-Serving Institutions Kresge Foundation UNCF
Sustainable_Campuses Building Green at Minority-Serving Institutions Kresge Foundation UNCF
Sustainable_Campuses Building Green at Minority-Serving Institutions Kresge Foundation UNCF
Sustainable_Campuses Building Green at Minority-Serving Institutions Kresge Foundation UNCF
Sustainable_Campuses Building Green at Minority-Serving Institutions Kresge Foundation UNCF
Sustainable_Campuses Building Green at Minority-Serving Institutions Kresge Foundation UNCF
Sustainable_Campuses Building Green at Minority-Serving Institutions Kresge Foundation UNCF
Sustainable_Campuses Building Green at Minority-Serving Institutions Kresge Foundation UNCF
Sustainable_Campuses Building Green at Minority-Serving Institutions Kresge Foundation UNCF
Sustainable_Campuses Building Green at Minority-Serving Institutions Kresge Foundation UNCF
Sustainable_Campuses Building Green at Minority-Serving Institutions Kresge Foundation UNCF
Sustainable_Campuses Building Green at Minority-Serving Institutions Kresge Foundation UNCF
Sustainable_Campuses Building Green at Minority-Serving Institutions Kresge Foundation UNCF
Sustainable_Campuses Building Green at Minority-Serving Institutions Kresge Foundation UNCF
Sustainable_Campuses Building Green at Minority-Serving Institutions Kresge Foundation UNCF
Sustainable_Campuses Building Green at Minority-Serving Institutions Kresge Foundation UNCF
Sustainable_Campuses Building Green at Minority-Serving Institutions Kresge Foundation UNCF
Sustainable_Campuses Building Green at Minority-Serving Institutions Kresge Foundation UNCF
Sustainable_Campuses Building Green at Minority-Serving Institutions Kresge Foundation UNCF
Sustainable_Campuses Building Green at Minority-Serving Institutions Kresge Foundation UNCF
Sustainable_Campuses Building Green at Minority-Serving Institutions Kresge Foundation UNCF
Sustainable_Campuses Building Green at Minority-Serving Institutions Kresge Foundation UNCF
Sustainable_Campuses Building Green at Minority-Serving Institutions Kresge Foundation UNCF
Sustainable_Campuses Building Green at Minority-Serving Institutions Kresge Foundation UNCF
Sustainable_Campuses Building Green at Minority-Serving Institutions Kresge Foundation UNCF
Sustainable_Campuses Building Green at Minority-Serving Institutions Kresge Foundation UNCF
Sustainable_Campuses Building Green at Minority-Serving Institutions Kresge Foundation UNCF
Sustainable_Campuses Building Green at Minority-Serving Institutions Kresge Foundation UNCF
Sustainable_Campuses Building Green at Minority-Serving Institutions Kresge Foundation UNCF
Sustainable_Campuses Building Green at Minority-Serving Institutions Kresge Foundation UNCF
Sustainable_Campuses Building Green at Minority-Serving Institutions Kresge Foundation UNCF
Sustainable_Campuses Building Green at Minority-Serving Institutions Kresge Foundation UNCF
Sustainable_Campuses Building Green at Minority-Serving Institutions Kresge Foundation UNCF
Sustainable_Campuses Building Green at Minority-Serving Institutions Kresge Foundation UNCF
Sustainable_Campuses Building Green at Minority-Serving Institutions Kresge Foundation UNCF
Sustainable_Campuses Building Green at Minority-Serving Institutions Kresge Foundation UNCF
Sustainable_Campuses Building Green at Minority-Serving Institutions Kresge Foundation UNCF
Sustainable_Campuses Building Green at Minority-Serving Institutions Kresge Foundation UNCF
Sustainable_Campuses Building Green at Minority-Serving Institutions Kresge Foundation UNCF
Sustainable_Campuses Building Green at Minority-Serving Institutions Kresge Foundation UNCF
Sustainable_Campuses Building Green at Minority-Serving Institutions Kresge Foundation UNCF
Sustainable_Campuses Building Green at Minority-Serving Institutions Kresge Foundation UNCF
Sustainable_Campuses Building Green at Minority-Serving Institutions Kresge Foundation UNCF
Sustainable_Campuses Building Green at Minority-Serving Institutions Kresge Foundation UNCF
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Sustainable_Campuses Building Green at Minority-Serving Institutions Kresge Foundation UNCF

  1. 1. Sustainable Campuses Building Green at Minority-Serving Institutions
  2. 2. Dear Colleagues: Welcome to Sustainable Campuses: Building Green at Minority-Serving Institutions, a resource developed by the Building Green project of UNCF’s Institute for Capacity Building. Sustainable Campuses is a collaboration of UNCF and our MSI partners: the American Indian Higher Education Consortium, the Hispanic Association of Colleges and Universities, and the Thurgood Marshall College Fund. We are also fortunate to be partnering on this initiative with the nation’s leader in the field of environmental sustainability in colleges and universities, Second Nature. And all of us owe a debt of gratitude to the Kresge Foundation, whose support and thought leadership have made this project not only possible, but successful. We think of Sustainable Campuses as a convening. As we did at the Building Green conferences over the past year, we have brought together educational and environmental innovators and encouraged them to share their ideas, their experiences, their lessons learned and their best practices. Conserving resources is part of the DNA of Minority-Serving Institutions, part of our historic commitment to serve students from low- and moderateincome families. So it comes naturally to MSIs to do more with less, whether “less” is financial resources or natural resources. It is also part of MSIs’ DNA to instill in students the attitudes and values of good citizenship, both by including them in our curricula and setting good examples of institutional citizenship. Our green example will help our students grow up to be a green generation and responsible stewards of the environment. By reading this book, by thinking about how you and your institution might benefit from the projects these articles describe, and by acting on your convictions, you become part of the solution. Thank you for that. Sincerely, 2 w w w. c l i m a t e n e u t r a l c a m p u s . c o m Michael L. Lomax President and CEO
  3. 3. Table of Contents Chapter 1 Campus Leadership sustainable campuses Building Green at Minority-Serving Institutions Editor in Chief Melissa Daley Production and Design Brazen Graphics Printer Teldon Print Media UNCF Building Green at Minority-Serving Institutions_________ 8 By Felicia M. Davis, UNCF Education for Sustainability Blueprint_______________________ 12 By Georges Dyer on behalf of Second Nature Organizing for a Successful Green Initiative: Wilberforce University_ ____________________________________ 18 Case Study by Nodie M. Washington, Ph.D., Special Assistant to the President In Collaboration with UNCF President and CEO  Dr. Michael L. Lomax Green For All Ambassadors: Working to Build a Green Future_ ___________________________ 22 _ Senior VP of Academic Programs and Strategic Initiatives  Karl W. Reid, Ed.D. Greening Howard University________________________________ 26 By Phaedra Ellis-Lamkins, CEO, Green For All By Illai Kenney, Howard University National Director, Communications and Brand Strategy Louis Barbash Interim Executive Director, ICB Clarissa Myrick-Harris, Ph.D Director, FIEP Building Green Initiative Felicia Davis Program Associate Darryl Ann Lai-Fang Published By Kyoto Publishing Suite L200 560 Beatty Street Vancouver, BC Canada, V6B 2L3 ISBN 978-0-9813326-4-2 Visions of Sustainability in 2050____________________________28 By Anthony D. Cortese, Sc.D., Second Nature Sustainable Spelman_______________________________________ 32 By Dr. Beverly Daniel Tatum, President of Spelman College The People Side of Performance Contracting_ _______________ 36 By Dr. Scott Finlinson, NORESCO Using Sustainability-Focused Learning on Higher-Education Campuses to Benefit Our Communities_____42 By Brandon Bandy, Haskell Indian Nations University Integrating Indigenous Principles of Sustainability into Higher Education______________________________________46 By Dr. Daniel R. Wildcat, Haskell Indian Nations University Minority-Serving Institutions: Harbingers of Education for Sustainability___________________50 By Dr. Fatemeh Shafiei, Spelman College 3
  4. 4. Table of Contents cont. Chapter 2 Finances Bridging the Gap Between Higher Education and Community Engagement___________________________________ 56 Case Study by Sharon Campbell, SYNERGY GROUP, and Henry M. Lancaster II, Lancaster Craig & Associates The entire content of this publication is protected by copyright, full details are available from the publisher. All rights are reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system or transmitted in any other form or by any means— electronic, photocopying, recording or otherwise—without prior written permission of the copyright holder. While every effort has been made to ensure accuracy of the content of this book, the publisher will accept no responsibility for any errors or omissions, or for any loss or damage, consequential or otherwise, suffered as a result of any material published herein. The publisher assumes no responsibility for statements made by advertisers in business competition, nor assumes responsibility for statements/opinions expressed or implied in the articles of this publication. 4 w w w. c l i m a t e n e u t r a l c a m p u s . c o m The viewpoints expressed in the following articles are those of the authors and do not represent the views of UNCF or Kyoto Publishing. No endorsement, implied or expressed is made. These articles represent a collection of viewpoints by various parties and are intended to promote discussion on sustainability. © 2012 By Kyoto Publishing All rights reserved. Published March 2012 Minority-Serving Institutions Championing the American College & University Presidents’ Climate Commitment_ ______58 _ By Ashka Naik on behalf of Second Nature University of Maryland, Baltimore___________________________ 62 Case Study by Comverge Going Green—A Rural Regional Perspective During a Period of Diminishing Resources_ __________________64 _ By Robert Gaines, Elizabeth City State University Environmental Defense Fund Helps Campuses Save Energy and Money—and Protect Human Health______________________ 70 Case Study by Marilynn Marsh-Robinson, Environmental Defense Fund Xavier University Partners With Siemens for Ten-Year Energy Performance Contract__________________ 72 Case Study by Curtis Brown, Siemens Industry Inc.
  5. 5. Chapter 3 Facilities Greening from the Inside-Out: How Sustainability Can Transform Your Campus _____________ 78 By Jaime Van Mourik, Center for Green Schools at the U.S. Green Building Council Water Reclamation and Reuse: Extending the Life Cycle of Water___________________________82 Case Study by Daniel Allison and Peter Varga, Organica Water Inc. HVAC Risk Analysis Can Improve Performance and Reduce Costs_ ________________________________________86 _ By Bill Harris, Trane Intelligent Energy Management_____________________________90 White Paper by Comverge Universities: Leaders of the Sustainability Movement_________98 By Melissa McDonald, Organica Water Inc. University of Central Missouri_____________________________ 102 Case Study by Trane CyberONE: A Sustainable and Catalyst Solution for Higher Education Today_______________ 106 By Marcela Oliva, Los Angeles Community College District Cheyney University Teams with NORESCO to Save Energy_ ____________________________110 _ Case Study by David Robb, Senior Account Executive, NORESCO 5
  6. 6. Chapter Campus leadership Minority-serving colleges and universities are actively creating a culture of sustainability across their campuses and throughout their communities. Sustainability leaders can be found among administrators, faculty and students. These leaders know that by educating and empowering all stakeholders, on campus and in the surrounding communities, they can strengthen and expand the move toward a more sustainable, green global culture and economy. Education workshops and campus sustainability campaigns are raising awareness and motivating others to take part in actively incorporating sustainability principles into their everyday lives.
  7. 7. chapter 1 CAMPUS Leadership | White Paper UNCF Building Green at Minority-Serving Institutions UNCF has joined with a broad range of education sustainability and climate-change organizations to promote green initiatives on minority-serving higher education campuses By Felicia M. Davis, UNCF 8 w w w. c l i m a t e n e u t r a l c a m p u s . c o m With climate change and sustainable development topping the Millennium Project list of “Global Challenges for Humanity,” minority-serving colleges and universities are uniquely positioned to emerge as leaders in the transition to a green economy. The UNCF Building Green at Minority-Serving Institutions (MSIs) Initiative is leading the charge to transform 20th-century campus infrastructures into living, learning laboratories that foster academic excellence and technological innovation needed to solve complex social, economic and environmental problems. The Building Green Initiative has established a diverse network of historically black, Hispanicserving, tribal and Asian Pacific Islander institutions motivated to advance campus-wide sustainability. The network fosters bold, forward-looking agendas that reach beyond traditional campus boundaries to expand access to information and forge valuable town and gown collaboration. Regarding equity as an economic and ecological imperative, the Building Green network is a dynamic force for change made up of individuals who share collective responsibility for the well-being of future generations, honoring the highest ideals of justice and human rights. As an agent of change, the Building Green mindset rejects inefficiency and wasteful depletion of natural resources, promoting instead conservation, environmental protection and restoration. “ he Building Green Initiative T has established a diverse network of historically black, Hispanicserving, tribal and Asian Pacific Islander institutions motivated to advance campus-wide sustainability.”
  8. 8. Campus-wide sustainability requires a major paradigm shift deconstructing well-defined disciplinary silos and moving beyond interdisciplinary frameworks to a supra-disciplinary conceptual framework that draws from and integrates insights from all disciplines. Multi-stakeholder collaboration is on the rise, generating refreshing new frames, big ideas and truly innovative approaches to sustainability. Culturally inspired solutions range from the resurrection of indigenous foods among tribal college communities to a creative proposal to engage historically black college and university (HBCU) students in greening Martin Luther King, Jr. boulevards nationwide. Credit for the success of the initiative belongs to individuals, institutions and organizations that came together to make the learning institutes, training workshops, online dialogues and other partner activities a success. Spelman facilities director Arthur Frazier helped to refine the UNCF approach to training to ensure integration with leading higher education sustainability organizations, particularly Second Nature, U.S. Green Building Council and Association for the Advancement of Sustainability in Higher Education. This approach increased access to resources, cultivated productive partnerships and contributed to the development of organizational programs that address specific MSI needs. Guided by President Beverly Tatum’s vision for a sustainable institution, Spelman is a sustainability leader, role model and resource, especially for small private institutions seeking to green their institutions. UNCF, together with our partners (American Indian Higher Education Consortium, Hispanic Association of Colleges and Universities, Thurgood Marshall College Fund and Second Nature) helps MSIs incorporate principles of sustainable design and energy efficiency into campus building projects and other sustainability efforts. Increasing the number of buildings and structures on MSI campuses that register for and achieve Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) certification and increasing the number of MSI signatories to the American College University Presidents’ Climate Commitment (ACUPCC) remain defining goals for the Initiative. Open to all MSIs, Building Green Learning Institutes address a broad range of campus sustainability and green building topics. Three two-day regional “ he Building Green Initiative T also supported the development of campus sustainability plans by awarding grants to 23 MSIs. This investment has generated impressive results.” learning institutes were held in Atlanta, Minneapolis and San Antonio. A national learning institute was held in June 2011 in Washington, DC. The national convening attracted significant participation from key federal agencies responsible for advancing minority institutions, energy efficiency and environmental sustainability. Invited participants included facilities directors, campus planners, sustainability officers, business managers, chief academic officers and presidents. Anthony Cortese, Antonio Flores, Dr. Daniel Wildcat, David Orr, Jerome Ringo, John Wilson, Joseph Lowery, Majora Carter, Nancy Sutley, Paul Rowland, Robert Stanton, Roger Rivera, Tom Goldtooth, William Moses, and Winnona LaDuke are among the thought leaders who generously shared insights, information and experience with learning institute participants. Presidents Verna Fowler, College of Menomonee Nation; Carlton Brown, Clark Atlanta University; Beverly Tatum, Spelman College; Beverly Hogan, Tougaloo College; Wesley McClure, Lane College and Elizabeth City State University Chancellor Willie Gilchrist each contributed to shaping long-range program goals. As a follow-up to learning institutes and to provide strategies for addressing specific challenges, UNCF developed a series of one-day training workshops to support LEED exam preparation, climate action planning, auditing and greenhouse gas inventories. The Building Green Initiative also supported the development of campus sustainability plans by awarding grants to 23 MSIs. This investment has generated impressive results. In addition to completing climate action plans and establishing green committees, sustainability activities are under way in virtually every corner of the academy including: administration, building, energy, recycling, dining, student involvement, transportation and instruction. 9
  9. 9. chapter 1 CAMPUS Leadership | White Paper UNCF teamed with the Sustainable Endowments Institute to conduct a sustainability survey of participating MSIs. The trailblazing MSI Green Report, featuring responses from 52 institutions from 24 states plus the commonwealth of Puerto Rico and the territory of Guam, profiles activities already under way at MSIs. Representing nearly half of all network participants, survey respondents educate more than a quarter-million students annually. Building Green Advisory Committee working groups have been established to focus on key areas of interest. Buildings and infrastructure, curriculum and faculty development, student involvement and community engagement are established areas of interest for the Building Green Initiative. Health and wellness, alternative energy research, and global sustainability issues are additional topics raised by Advisory Committee members. Dr. Richard Gragg of Florida AM University, is helping to shape the working group communication process that will facilitate greater collaboration. Educating the MSI community about the impacts and implications of climate change is an important program priority. The American Indian and Alaska Native Climate Change Working Group brings together native and non-native scholars working on climate mitigation and adaptation, energy, sustainability and resource management, with a focus on climate change education and research at tribal colleges and universities. Working Group convener, Dr. Daniel Wildcat—an indigenous knowledge, environment, and education scholar—welcomed the UNCF Building Green Initiative as an active participant. Haskell University, a Building Green grantee, started its first recycling program, hosted an indigenous foods conference and will host a major tribal college sustainability conference leading up to the Rio +20 Earth Summit June 2012. 10 w w w. c l i m a t e n e u t r a l c a m p u s . c o m One of the more ambitious proposals advanced by a Building Green grantee involves the creation of a state of the art energy lab that would house the Clark Atlanta Center for Alternative, Renewable Energy, Technology and Training (CARET2). The Center is envisioned as an energy hub where engineers and scientists can engage in cutting-edge research; an incubator that contributes to commercialization; and a facility that supports collaboration between the Atlanta University Center and national laboratories. The design includes laboratories and support facilities for research in energy, materials, biotechnology, computational science and engineering as well as several multipurpose facilities such as a museum, reading and lecture rooms, and a greenhouse that would be open to the public. The museum would include a Climate Theater a concept advanced by the Climate Institute that incorporates hands-on, community-based, expo-style exhibits that will educate the community about climate change. Other grantee accomplishments, include the establishment of a senior-level sustainability director position at Elizabeth City State University (North Carolina), the first campus to sign the ACUPCC as a part of the Building Green Network; an energy efficiency housing competition that can be replicated in reservation housing at United Tribes Technical College (North Dakota); a parking survey at California State University-Northridge that will lead to reduced idling and lower emissions at the large commuter campus; a sustainable student lifestyle proposal integrating health and wellness from Tougaloo University; a comprehensive plan for infrastructure upgrades at Wilberforce University; and student engagement projects underway at Delaware State, Howard and University of Texas-San Antonio are among the many outcomes from the Kresge-funded sustainability planning grants. The Green For All HBCU Ambassador Program, US Green Building Council (USGBC) Georgia Chapter, National Wildlife Federation Campus Ecology program, and Environmental Defense Fund (EDF) Climate Corps Fellows Program have all partnered with the Building Green Initiative to expand campus sustainability activities at MSIs. Building Green partnerships leverage available resources to expand student involvement, energy audits, LEED training and provide free or discounted services. EDF will deploy Climate Fellows to several UNCF grantee institutions this summer and USGBC Georgia has spearheaded a pilot program to create a learning track for HBCU students that includes placement on LEED projects, an experience required for LEED AP certification. The UN Habitat-sponsored Africa Green Teams is also working to connect young eco-entrepreneurs in Kenya, Rwanda, Uganda and Senegal with HBCU students in the US. The business community, large and small, has been an important Building Green partner. Trane, Wells Fargo, Federal Express, NORESCO, Organica, Siemens
  10. 10. and Comverge have supported the program along with Woodline Solutions, Integral Group, Herman Russell, Lancaster Craig and Associates, and the Laminin Group which have provided technical support and resources. UNCF is seeking cloud-based analytics software or dashboard applications that can be used to measure and optimize energy, carbon, waste and water to pilot a program under review by Building Green grantee Lane College. A project goal is to create a user-friendly affordable process to accurately map MSI energy use, emissions and monitor reductions through 2020. Sharing information and tools for advancing sustainability is a high priority and financing for green building, retrofits and sustainable projects is one of the greatest needs identified by network participants. Financing sustainability is a significant challenge for MSIs; the website buildinggreennetwork.org provides links and drives traffic to tools provided on the ACUPCC website. The Building Green Initiative is working with the U.S. Department of Energy, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, U.S. Department of Interior and other governmental agencies to educate MSIs about doing business with the federal government. The Initiative will work with interested federal agencies to produce and promote webinars on energy efficiency, renewable energy technology and various environmental sustainability topics. With strong support from the Kresge Foundation the UNCF Building Green Initiative has been instrumental in increasing the number of MSI signatories to the ACUPCC and advancing LEED as a framework for sustainability planning. Promoting interdisciplinary approaches to environmental studies and curriculum, the program also cultivates student leadership as part of a comprehensive effort to help MSIs leapfrog over outdated, inefficient, wasteful technologies, values and mindsets to becoming global sustainability leaders. About the Author Felicia M. Davis directs the UNCF Institute for Capacity Building Facilities and Infrastructure Enhancement Program, where she oversees implementation of the $1.8 million Kresge Foundation funded Building Green at Minority-Serving Institutions initiative. Davis works to advance sustainability at historically black, Hispanicserving, and tribal college and universities with a goal of reducing institutional carbon footprints and moving aggressively toward carbon-neutral campuses. She is especially proud of her work with the African Green Teams, a UN Habitat sponsored program to develop young eco-entrepreneurs and connect the teams with interested HBCU students. The UNCF Building Green Initiative seeks to help catapult HBCUs and other minority-serving institutions into leadership roles in the transition to a green economy. UNCF Building Green Initiative program partners include Thurgood Marshall College Fund, the Hispanic Association of Colleges and Universities, the American Indian Higher Education Consortium and Second Nature. 11
  11. 11. chapter 1 CAMPUS Leadership | White Paper Education for Sustainability Blueprint Even with colleges and universities committed to sustainability, the sector as a whole needs a blueprint to ensure that creating a sustainable culture is a strategic imperative of higher education By Georges Dyer on behalf of Second Nature 12 In 2010, a critical mass of the leading organizations that support Education for Sustainability (EfS) in the U.S. higher education sector came together to create a blueprint to map out the best strategies for accelerating their efforts, collaborating effectively, and supporting each other in meeting their common goals. The process was supported by funding from the Garfield Foundation and the Kresge Foundation, and was coordinated by Second Nature and the Campaign for Environmental Literacy. w w w. c l i m a t e n e u t r a l c a m p u s . c o m More than 40 organizations were invited to participate throughout the year, and on November 29, 2010 representatives from 23 of these organizations convened, to create the EfS (Education for Sustainability) Blueprint. The premise for the meeting was that systemic change in higher education requires tackling many leverage points simultaneously and in a collaborative manner. After an assessment of the movement’s recent progress and a review of new and upcoming “ olleges and universities have C made tremendous progress, particularly over the last five years, in recognizing the importance and urgency of the sustainability challenge, and in taking significant action.” initiatives planned by the participating organizations, the group collectively created a list of the most important next steps, followed by self-identified teams that would continue to work in many of these critical areas. Indicators of progress Colleges and universities have made tremendous progress, particularly over the last five years, in recognizing the importance and urgency of the sustainability challenge, and in taking significant
  12. 12. action. While there are few hard metrics and no comprehensive national assessment of the state of sustainability in higher education, the following are 13 encouraging indicators of progress (as of November 2010): 1. total of 675 college and university presidents A have signed the American College University Presidents’ Climate Commitment (ACUPCC). 2. The Association for the Advancement of Sustainability in Higher Education now has 1,100 institutional members (800 universities and colleges) and has attracted 2,200 participants to its 2010 conference. 3. More than 113 new academic degree programs in sustainability (not counting new certificate programs) have been established. 4. More than 1,100 inter-disciplinary degree programs in the environment now exist. 5. Campus sustainability staffing is on the rise, adding about 400 new positions each year. 6. More than 70 new sustainability centers have opened on campuses. 7. There are 905 LEED-certified campus buildings (and 3,000+ registered with LEED). 8. Greenhouse gas emissions inventories were reported by 547 campuses, and 330 have submitted climate action plans to the ACUPCC. 9. full 240 institutions are participating in the A Sustainability Tracking, Assessment Rating System (STARS). 10. ustainability education was recognized in federal S law for the first time through the creation of the University Sustainability Program in the Higher Education Opportunity Act, followed by the Sustainability Education Summit: Citizenship and Pathways for a Green Economy hosted by the U.S. Department of Education in September 2010. 11. The Energy Action Coalition has effectively stopped 130 proposed new coal plants. 12. stimates are that 40 – 60 percent of campuses E have implemented trayless dining. 13. he national RecycleMania competition is now held T on 510 campuses. Although anecdotal evidence points to a great deal of progress, more in-depth planning and stakeholder “ lthough anecdotal evidence points A to a great deal of progress, more in-depth planning and stakeholder education are still needed on a vast majority of campuses.” education are still needed on a vast majority of campuses. Many initiatives operate in isolation from each other rather than as part of a master plan, thereby limiting their ability to make the deep institutional changes necessary to create sustainable campuses. Progress is greater in “greening” campus buildings, grounds and operations than in educating stakeholders, and there are few, if any, indicators that this generation of college graduates on average is any more literate about sustainability than previous generations. In sum, the level of transformation required to truly meet the challenge of creating a sustainable society is such that current efforts still fall short of reaching the necessary tipping point to establish sustainability as a core goal of the higher education sector. Major gaps To reach this critical point, the following objectives must be addressed: 1. Engage institutions with their communities Tremendous win–win achievements can occur when colleges and universities team up with their host communities to tackle common sustainability challenges, especially those that help improve local quality of life and create jobs. In the process, faculty have the chance to apply their knowledge and skills to pressing local issues; students receive hands-on, real-world experience (good for their motivation as well as their résumés); the university gains goodwill and positive press; and the community receives inspiration, free labor and cutting-edge expertise. Once sufficient university engagement of this kind takes place, faculty members recognize the need to reshape the curriculum to become more interdisciplinary and oriented around real-world challenges. And in the best of cases, institutions then start to function as integrated learning communities. While examples abound of successful “engaged university” projects, a major initiative is needed to take these models to scale nationally. 13
  13. 13. chapter 1 CAMPUS Leadership | White Paper 2. Increase faculty and staff resources To reach a sufficient percentage of the nation’s higher education faculty and staff, large-scale faculty and staff training efforts will be required, and the following programs would be helpful: • accessible, interactive resource center (i.e., a An “knowledge machine”); • Toolkits with manageable goals for students, staff and faculty that provide guidance on sustainability message must convey core sustainability values, yet use appropriate language for local audiences. And, in addition to messaging tactics, a better job must be done of ensuring that people understand the science of sustainability. 4. Expand the movement While some progress has been made, the movement still needs more of the right people to come to the table, i.e., projects; • virtual academy that combines the “knowledge A machine”—resources, case studies and project libraries—into a learning resource for everyone that is affordable, accessible to non-traditional students, dynamic and evolving; and • Programs to promote broad faculty development strategies around education for sustainability. 3. trengthen the movement’s vision S and message Sustainability is a complex concept. It is important that • While business has a major impact on higher education practices, an effort is required to organize and engage big business and industry with a commitment to sustainability, to both push and support higher education to produce graduates who are literate about sustainability. • less than 50 years, people of color will be the In majority, and the movement will be successful only if they are more involved and playing leadership roles. • Better coalitions need to be built with natural there is broad understanding of what it means and why allies, such as health, labor and the faith-based higher education is crucial for creating a sustainable communities. society. The movement toward sustainability in higher education suffers from the lack of both a widely held vision for a desirable future that promotes systemic, • A more bipartisan perspective must be promoted. • The youth sustainability movement has achieved integrated thinking, and a common framework or remarkable successes, particularly with energy narrative. The message needs to connect more with policy. Student leadership at their institutions is economic development, jobs and growth, while at responsible for much of the progress noted above. the same time reframing success as something much However, engaging the youth movement in driving larger: a healthy, just and sustainable society, and a fundamental transformation in the sector in an improved quality of life for society as a whole such a way that educating for sustainability as the (imperative for a planet of 9 billion people). The norm has been a missed opportunity to date. Clear leverage points for engaging students need to be identified, as well as specific, core objectives around 14 w w w. c l i m a t e n e u t r a l c a m p u s . c o m which students can organize. “ ustainability is a complex S concept. It is important that there is broad understanding of what it means and why higher education is crucial for creating a sustainable society.” 5. Build the movement’s infrastructure Better mechanisms (such as the 2010 Blueprint meeting that resulted in this report) are needed in order for this remarkable “ecosystem” of organizations and enterprises to evolve into a more efficient network. Sustainable financing sources are
  14. 14. required to support the work that happens between our organizations, as well as that of our individual organizations, most of which operate on soft money. We must have a mechanism to stay up to date on what other organizations are doing and be able to map this growing network. 6. Strengthen policy and advocacy work Smart, strategic policies that provide funding and incentives and remove barriers to change are “ remendous win–win T achievements can occur when colleges and universities team up with their host communities to tackle common sustainability challenges, especially those that help improve local quality of life and create jobs.” required to transform the higher education sector term, the work needed to build the advocacy and so that it is able to generate the knowledge and policy capacity of the community should continue graduates necessary to creating a sustainable society. in preparation for when the tide turns yet again. Expanded advocacy efforts are critical for garnering Another potential focus for our efforts is state the broad support that would create such policies and policy, which often has little impact on private programs. It is important to note that new federal schools but can be a significant lever for change legislation and funding are highly unlikely for at least within public colleges and universities. the next two years, and it will be a struggle just to keep in place what little funding now exists. 7. Financing Financing sustainability efforts is one of the most commonly identified barriers to change by individual colleges and universities. Often the lowest-cost “ ew financial models need to N be developed and disseminated to help schools address lack of capital for instituting change, as well as to favor a more sustainable future for these institutions.” systems are used in campus operations, and typically capital and operational budgets are separate, creating a barrier to full life-cycle cost accounting. College and university endowments have a major impact in investment trends, but they often lack transparency and alignment with institutional values and goals. New financial models need to be developed and disseminated to help schools address lack of capital for instituting change, as well as to favor a more Nonetheless, we have been able to identify and sustainable future for these institutions. enlist unprecedented support over the past two to three years for sustainability education within the Next steps Obama administration and from some members of education; surely some small percentage of these The following focus areas and next steps were identified by the Education for Sustainability network as priorities for further work throughout the coming year. They are designed to address many of the major gaps identified above. Volunteers agreed to serve as conveners and invited other members of the network to explore ways to collaborate around the specific focus areas listed below: existing funds can be infused with a sustainability • Community Engagement preference. And, with an eye toward the longer • Curriculum and Research Congress. Short-term progress is still possible by developing new ideas that employ unique federal assets (e.g., convening power, influence, etc.) and do not require new money. In addition, $100+ billion per year flows from the federal government to higher 15
  15. 15. chapter 1 White Paper • Facilities and Operations • Messaging and Outreach • Diversity • Network Building • Policy and Advocacy • Investments, Endowments and Financial Models • Executive Leadership Conclusion Thousands of faculty and administrators at hundreds of colleges and universities have committed to leading their institutions toward adopting the principles of sustainability. However, while individuals at colleges and universities may often be ready to embrace change, higher education as a system is itself very conservative and contains immense buffers to change. Campus champions (administrators, faculty, operational personnel and students) simply cannot do the job alone. They need an effective, strategic and influential national movement that can provide resources and facilitate opportunities to work together and learn from one another. This is precisely the goal of those who participated in the creation of the EfS Blueprint. The participants focused on strengthening the essential elements of a national movement—the intellectual and financial capital, the moral framework, the visibility of the movement in the public space, and the necessary tools—that in turn can help champions on campuses surmount difficult internal and external barriers. The process of developing this Blueprint resulted in concrete, pragmatic steps for fostering collaboration and increasing the impact of our individual efforts. 16 With increased cooperation and support, we are confident that a tipping point can and will be achieved w w w. c l i m a t e n e u t r a l c a m p u s . c o m despite the daunting challenges that lie ahead. For the complete EfS Blueprint document, please visit www.secondnature.org/efsblueprint. “ mart, strategic policies that S provide funding and incentives and remove barriers to change are required to transform the higher education sector so that it is able to generate the knowledge and graduates necessary to creating a sustainable society.”
  16. 16. About the Author Georges Dyer joined Second Nature at the beginning of 2007 as vice president of programs. His work has focused on building and supporting networks such as the ACUPCC and the Advancing Green Building in Higher Education Initiative. Dyer has played a leading role in developing many of the core supporting documents for the initiative and topical resources, including the ACUPCC Voluntary Carbon Offset Protocol and Leading Profound Change—a resource for college and university presidents engaged in leading the transformational change processes required to move toward sustainability on campus and beyond. He has spoken and presented widely about the ACUPCC and the rest of Second Nature’s work at national and regional conferences and individual campuses. He is on the advisory board of Greenopolis.com and is a trustee of StratLeade Sustainability Education. Dyer is a graduate of The Mountain School of Milton Academy, Phillips Exeter Academy, Dartmouth College, and the Blekinge Institute of Technology in Karlskrona, Sweden, where he earned a master’s degree in strategic leadership toward sustainability. 17
  17. 17. chapter 1 CAMPUS Leadership | Case Study Organizing for a Successful Green Initiative: Wilberforce University Ohio’s Wilberforce University shares its commitment to a climate-neutral campus, and the work of campus stakeholders in attaining the university’s “green vision” Case Study by Nodie M. Washington, Ph.D., Special Assistant to the President Introduction Consistent with its mission of educating students for the global community, Wilberforce University has implemented systematic plans and strategies to facilitate a campus-wide reduction in its carbon footprint. Termed the Green Initiative, this effort will institutionalize the university’s commitment to climate neutrality by educating all constituent groups on reducing their contribution to negative greenhouse gas emissions. The spirit of the Green Initiative should extend beyond the campus and into the everyday lives of our constituents. University goals, objectives and strategies to the benefit of its community of scholars and the surrounding areas. A Green Steering Team (GST) was formed to guide the implementation of the Green Initiative goals, objectives and strategies. The GST consists of the university’s president and vice presidents, project coordinators and chairs of the functional green committees. Five functional green committees were identified to encompass key strategic areas requiring significant planning and focus: Data Collection Analysis, Technology, Academic Program, Recycle/Reduce/Reuse, and Communication. Composed of students, faculty and staff, each committee defined its scope and deliverables around the university’s overall goals, objectives and strategies. Achieving a green campus... the work 18 w w w. c l i m a t e n e u t r a l c a m p u s . c o m Green Initiative: Wilberforce University Green organization The goal of the Wilberforce Green Vision is to help the university become recognized as a green campus, consistently reducing its carbon footprint The five functional committees have defined initial plans for moving the Wilberforce University toward becoming a green campus. The Data Collection Analysis committee has begun collecting energyusage data across all buildings and areas on the campus to document the university’s current carbon footprint. Plans are in place to implement usage of energy-efficient items/equipment, including light bulbs, HVAC systems, water heating systems, plumbing and roofing. Items toward instituting green consciousness in everyday activities of the university community are also being addressed. The Technology committee is focused on identifying effective and state-of-art systems that propel the institution closer to energy efficiency, including a more paperless campus. The Recycle/Reduce/Reuse
  18. 18. committee aims to positively change behaviors of university constituents relative to all items being used and/or consumed. Partnering with Waste Management, Inc., recycling efforts are being organized. Our Academic Program committee is chartered with educating our community of scholars in environmental science phenomena via interdisciplinary courses/seminars and other venues to generate a continuous focus on sustainability issues. To effectively communicate the vision, activities and all green efforts, the Communication committee is exploring novel information pathways, including Facebook, Twitter, text messages as well as screen savers on all university computers. Contests with awards are planned to encourage critical thinking around unique and innovative ways of moving the university toward its vision of becoming a green campus. Taking great pride as the first private coeducational historically black college and university in the United States, Wilberforce University is pledged to move its campus well into the 21st century by “going green.” 19 About the Author Dr. Nodie M. Washington has an M.Sc. in chemistry from Rutgers University and a Ph.D. in physical chemistry from Ohio State University. She spent 25 years at the Procter and Gamble Company, leading research teams of scientists and engineers in the development of fabric-care products such as Tide and Downy. Dr. Washington currently serves as the special assistant to the president at Wilberforce University, with a focus area of Special Projects, and as co-coordinator of the university’s Green Initiative. Located in Ohio and established in 1856, Wilberforce University is America’s first private, coeducational university established to educate men and women of African descent.
  19. 19. CAMPUSES DEMAND MILLIONS OF GALLONS OF WATER EVERY YEAR, and “drinking” water is used to meet all of these needs, even in places – like toilets – where it will never be consumed. Wastewater is then dumped into a municipal sewer system and pumped miles away for treatment. This costly, wasteful and energy-intensive process simply doesn’t make sense.
  20. 20. Introducing BlueHouse: TM a better way to treat and reuse water BlueHouse is a water treatment and reclamation system that utilizes a highly complex ecosystem comprised of plants, bacteria, and other organisms to naturally treat, purify and recycle up to 90,000 gallons of sanitary and storm water per day. Great for the environment. Greater still for your campus. What makes BlueHouse truly remarkable is what it does with water once it’s treated. Instead of pumping it away, it extends the life of water by reusing it on-site for things like cooling towers, boilers irrigation, and even toilet flushing – creating a more sustainable campus. Pays for itself in as little as four years. BlueHouse looks like a greenhouse and makes an attractive addition to any campus. A BlueHouse conserves public water supplies by reducing freshwater withdrawal from increasingly depleted sources. Since less potable water is used, water costs are lowered – allowing this facility to pay for itself over time. GRANTS AVAILABLE. Call (804) 545-5485 to learn about grants for bringing a BlueHouse system to your campus. Botanical garden? Treatment Facility? Living Laboratory? Or the solution to a sustainable campus water system? ALL OF THE ABOVE. The BlueHouse water treatment and reclamation system applies innovative bio- nano- and information technologies in an engineered ecological habitat to purify waste water. Treated water is then freed for reuse in any non-potable application on campus. The facility looks like a botanical garden within a greenhouse and provides an exceptional “living laboratory” for environmental sciences, biology, urban planning, and more. organicawater.com/campus
  21. 21. chapter 1 CAMPUS Leadership | White Paper Green For All Ambassadors: Working to Build a Green Future The Green For All Ambassador Program helps historically black colleges and universities continue to embolden and empower the next generation of America’s leaders as they work to make an equitable and green economy a reality By Phaedra Ellis-Lamkins, CEO, Green For All Throughout history, America’s youth have stepped In 2010, we launched the Green For All College up to face the nation’s greatest challenges. Just Ambassador Program in partnership with 10 look at the struggle for civil rights, the battle for historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs). women’s equality and the fight for fair wages: This alliance was a natural fit. For more than a century, young people played an integral part in all of these HBCUs have represented hope and excellence, movements. Their energy, optimism and willingness producing many of America’s finest leaders. to propose new solutions to old problems have helped society make incredible strides in the long march toward justice. 22 w w w. c l i m a t e n e u t r a l c a m p u s . c o m That’s why Green For All has actively worked to get young people involved in the development of the green economy. As we combat two of today’s greatest challenges—pollution and poverty, both of which disproportionately affect people of color and low-income communities—we recognize the incredible role that young leaders will play in our effort, both today and tomorrow. “ n 2010, we launched the Green I For All College Ambassador Program in partnership with 10 historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs). This alliance was a natural fit. For more than a century, HBCUs have represented hope and excellence, producing many of America’s finest leaders.”
  22. 22. Today, these institutions are educating the leaders of the future, and Green For All is proud to be working with them through the Ambassador Program, which provides mentoring and expert training that empower students with the tools to serve as green champions on their campuses. Green For All helps them lead education workshops and semester-long campus sustainability campaigns to raise awareness and get others involved. In the fall 2010 semester alone, the Ambassadors “ ecoming a Green For All College B Ambassador at my university has given me indispensable tools and training to become an even more committed and knowledgeable environmental leader, both at FAMU and in my local community.” coordinated more than 20 workshops on various topics ranging from environmental justice to sustainable economic development. UNCF has led the way in providing sustainability resources and accountability to campuses; that’s why we are proud to partner with UNCF to help make the promise of a green economy a reality. The students involved in the Ambassador Program are doing a great job of raising awareness, opening minds and inspiring others to join the movement. “ or the past month, my campus F partner, Nikita Piercy, and I have been getting involved with existing green initiatives on our campus while planning our own fall workshop series, along with a spring greening campaign and recycling competition.” A few of them were kind enough to share their stories, in their own words: Cassidy Cannon, Elizabeth City State University I am a junior marketing major at Elizabeth City State University in North Carolina, where I also serve as the vice president of external affairs of the Student Government Association. This year, I became a Green For All College Ambassador, which I am very excited about because this opportunity introduced me to a whole new world on my campus. For the past month, my campus partner, Nikita Piercy, and I have been getting involved with existing green initiatives on our campus while planning our own fall workshop series, along with a spring greening campaign and recycling competition. Being a student leader isn’t easy. Whom do I talk to on campus? What projects have been completed? Do we have funding for that? To add even more pressure, this movement has the ability to change the world—literally, change the world. And I am now a catalyst for that change. Stop. Breathe. Now breathe again. Every movement has a starting point. The first step is to prepare your mind. Learn everything there is to know. Luckily, there is information everywhere about the green economy and a sustainable world. First, see how that information applies to your area or university. Second, talk to everybody. Make them aware of your purpose, describe your goal, and share your motivation. You’d be surprised at how many people “know a guy.” Third, solidify those resources, and ask them to plan with you. Learn to listen to them. More times than not, they know what they’re talking about. Let your failures motivate you to do better, and let your achievements motivate you to do more. And after your first workshop is complete: Stop. Breathe. Now breathe again. Every movement has a starting point… 23
  23. 23. chapter 1 CAMPUS Leadership | White Paper Jomar Floyd, Florida AM University As a senior at Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University (FAMU), I am a proud and leading member of the campus’s Green Coalition. Becoming a Green For All College Ambassador at my university has given me indispensable tools and training to become an even more committed and knowledgeable environmental leader, both at FAMU and in my local community. My co-ambassador at FAMU, Ursula Ible, and I recently organized two educational workshops designed “ here will be some challenges T ahead for me and for my fellow Ambassador, Whitney Jones —we have faced some of them already, but it is comforting to know that we have the support of Green For All, Students in Free Enterprise, and the Department of Entrepreneurship and Professional Development.” to empower students to step up to new levels of This year, as part of my ambassadorship at FAMU, environmental leadership. I am eager to learn more about how to “revive” The first workshop, “Your Life, Your Environment,” focused on critical environmental issues such as water shortages, pollution and lack of access to the traditions of sustainability once held by our institutions, by creating partnerships with our farmers, landowners and local communities. reality for many communities across the country. We Alicia Crudup, Jackson State University also discussed the ongoing fight between the Nestlé My name is Alicia Crudup, and I am a senior Corporation and the Wacissa, Florida community entrepreneurship major at Jackson State University over the Wacissa River and springs, where Nestlé is located in the heart of Mississippi (City of Jackson). allegedly depleting the water sources without regard And yes, we still have a heartbeat! It is a little faint, to the local community. but we are going to pump some fresh, oxygenated affordable, healthy food—issues that are a grim daily blood into it. The Green Jobs Movement we are Students later enjoyed Markese “Doo-Dat” Bryant’s Mother Earth, but also to our families, friends and Overall, the turnout was great. Students were actively communities. I am very proud to be a part of this engaged in conversations about the information effort. This will be a legacy I will leave behind not only presented to them. for my own children, but for others’ children as well. During the second workshop, “Carbon Climate Mother Earth was here before us, and she will be here Change the Benefits of Going Green,” Ursula and I after us. So, while we are spending time here, it is shared why we got involved in the green movement. up to us to give back to her as she continually gives I explained Green For All’s mission and why “green to us. There will be some challenges ahead for me jobs” are needed, particularly in low-income and 24 creating is our way of giving back not only to music video The Dream Reborn (My President is Green). and for my fellow Ambassador, Whitney Jones—we w w w. c l i m a t e n e u t r a l c a m p u s . c o m communities of color. have faced some of them already, but it is comforting to know that we have the support of Green For All, Last, we discussed how HBCU students must become Students in Free Enterprise, and the Department of a stronger force in the green movement to help Entrepreneurship and Professional Development. ensure that our communities are at the forefront of reaping the environmental, economic and health benefits afforded by a clean energy economy. Our first workshop here at Jackson State was a success. Our Bridging the Gap prompt will be used again at the beginning of next semester. The
  24. 24. students were so attentive, and they enjoyed the step some important contacts that will help our school forward/step back workshop just as we, the College make a transition to a greener future. After all that Ambassadors, had at our training. The students has happened this past semester, I cannot wait who participated in our event were so excited that until next semester when we actually take action a committee of nine students was formed to help toward making Jackson State University a more us carry out our duties as Ambassadors. I see these environmentally friendly campus! people as the future leaders of the movement when I move on from the university. I am excited about our next workshop, which will be very interactive with much discussion. It will be interesting to hear other points of view and use them in a positive way. We are also making About the Author Phaedra Ellis-Lamkins is the chief executive officer of Green For All. Ellis-Lamkins has led Green For All to several groundbreaking policy victories at the federal, state and local levels. Under her leadership, Green For All has become one of the country’s leading advocates for a clean-energy economy, and one of its most important voices on the intersection of economics and environment. Prior to joining Green For All, Ellis-Lamkins was a leader in California’s labor movement, heading both the South Bay AFL–CIO Labor Council and Working Partnerships USA. To learn more, please visit: http://www.greenforall.org. 25
  25. 25. chapter 1 CAMPUS Leadership | White Paper Greening Howard University Howard University’s renewable energy and recycling programs show that campus leadership is actively incorporating sustainability into campus culture By Illai Kenney, Howard University 26 w w w. c l i m a t e n e u t r a l c a m p u s . c o m The leadership at Howard University clearly understands its responsibility to the environment. It is committed to placing the university among the leading institutions responding to many global environmental issues by “Going Green” while still providing a high-quality living, learning and working experience for students, staff and faculty. In this regard, the 2010–2011 academic year was a productive time for Howard University. The university has made great strides in going green. For one, to coordinate all its green efforts, Howard University officially established an office of sustainability, headed by Alfonzye Chisholm. An example of Howard University’s commitment to going green is demonstrated in its ongoing partnership with Honeywell International through a long-term, multi-phased energy performance contract that began in 2007. The goal of the project is to promote the efficient use of energy by better controlling that use. This reduces energy consumption and results in cost savings over a period of time. This return on investment pays for the implementation cost of the energy project. According to Chris Bowens, a project manager at Honeywell, “The university spends hundreds of thousands of dollars a month on its gas bill.” Currently, Howard burns oil and gas as energy sources, and has been working with the company to improve energy usage and become more sustainable. “ n example of Howard A University’s commitment to going green is demonstrated in its ongoing partnership with Honeywell International through a long-term, multi-phased energy performance contract that began in 2007.”
  26. 26. The first step was to identify opportunities for saving energy across the campus. These opportunities were used to establish the energy baseline and later became the focus of projects that would reduce that usage. As a result, Honeywell has started a number of projects around the campus, among them HVAC and lighting-control retrofits. Of significant importance is the recent installation of solar panels on the roof of Burr Gymnasium. These panels are used to heat the water in the building, and they represent Howard’s first renewable energy source. “The university currently uses gas to heat city water to create steam,” said Bowens. The steam travels through a pipe on campus and goes through a heat exchange to heat the building. By using the sun as a renewable energy source to heat the building’s water, the university reduces the volume of gas consumed, thus lowering the expense. The 21 domestic hot water solar panels on the roof of the building also send a clear message that renewable energy is here and that Howard University is committed to going green. In furthering Howard University’s green efforts, the Office of Sustainability worked closely with the university’s recycling hauler and Office of Residence Life to help advance the recycling program. To this end, 13,000 personal recycling bins were dispensed to students living in the dormitories to help facilitate recycling. Each resident was given two bins: one for bottles and cans, and one for paper. This, along with more than 300 posters and other educational materials, helped to increase the university’s overall diversion rate. For the second year during RecycleMania (a 10-week competition among universities nationwide), Howard measured its diversion rate and collected data about waste management. The average diversion rate for 2010 was 14 percent. The average diversion rate for 2011 was 22 percent. Overall, 111,640 pounds of materials were recovered and diverted from landfills during RecycleMania. Campus-wide, Howard diverted 8.65 pounds of material per person. “ verall, 111,640 pounds of O materials were recovered and diverted from landfills during RecycleMania. Campus-wide, Howard diverted 8.65 pounds of material per person.” Much effort has been made to advance the university’s recycling program, but there have been many other accomplishments as well. Howard University celebrated Earth Day in a grand fashion! More than 100 student, faculty and staff volunteers planted thousands of plants across campus. The office of sustainability hosted an informational program and students began the HALO Green organic garden. The garden was planted by—and is entirely maintained by—students. All Howard University dormitories now have bicycle racks, and all renovated buildings going forward will include bicycle racks. In expanding its green efforts, the Office of Residence Life has declared recycling mandatory for all students living on campus; all nine dormitories will compete in an energyreduction competition similar to RecycleMania. The university is also in the beginning stages of creating nine electric vehicle-charging stations across the campus. These successes have helped increase the momentum of green efforts on the campus. Howard University accomplished a great deal in the 2010-2011 academic year, but there are still many more steps to take. There are 400 new recycle bins to be deployed on campus. There will be collections on each floor of every dormitory to help increase the participation of students living on campus. Taking advantage of every opportunity available, Howard University is going green! 27 About the Author Illai Kenney is a senior telecommunications management major at Howard University with a focus on making her campus sustainable, including in the areas of socially responsible investing, recycling, and community development, and others. She is a student intern at Howard University’s Office of Sustainability and a Green For All Ambassador on her campus.
  27. 27. chapter 1 CAMPUS Leadership | White Paper Visions of Sustainability in 2050 The promise of a sustainable future can be fulfilled if higher education institutions integrate principles of sustainability into the fundamental purpose of all learning By Anthony D. Cortese, Sc.D., Second Nature 28 w w w. c l i m a t e n e u t r a l c a m p u s . c o m The following is a vision for a healthy, peaceful, socially just, economically secure, culturally vibrant and environmentally sustainable world. This vision is synthesized from the thinking of a large and diverse number of world leaders in many fields of endeavor, and from reports and programs of the world’s most progressive governmental, business, academic and civic organizations. Many of the ideas are embodied in the UN’s eight Millennium Development Goals that range from halving extreme poverty to halting the spread of HIV/AIDS and providing universal primary education, all by the target date of 2015. It is a vision that is vital to achieving sustainability by 2050—and possible with bold, collaborative leadership from all sectors of society. In order for society to achieve this vision, higher education must develop a new framework in which individual institutions and the sector as a whole operate as fully integrated communities that teach, research, and model social and ecological sustainability. In order for this vision to become a reality, creating a thriving, enduring society must become the fundamental purpose of all learning; sustainability must become a foundational principle of higher education rather than a specialized discipline; and all graduates must understand how to live their personal and professional lives in alignment with the “ n order for society to achieve this I vision, higher education must develop a new framework in which individual institutions and the sector as a whole operate as fully integrated communities that teach, research, and model social and ecological sustainability.”
  28. 28. principles of sustainability. In short, a sustainability perspective must become second nature to us all. Without a diverse coalition, higher education will not be able to bring about the transformation needed to ensure a safe and sustainable future. As institutions charged with educating students of diverse socio-economic backgrounds to become responsible citizens, minority-serving institutions play a pivotal role in advancing society toward holistic sustainability. Only with their dynamic leadership, long-term commitment and active participation can higher education lead the way to a sustainable future. and sustainable agriculture. Biological diversity is once again increasing. • New business models are based on the following: – Increased production of durable, repairable goods, and elimination of persistent toxic and bio-accumulative substances. – business focus on providing the ultimate A ends of products or services, not the products or services themselves. Products are viewed as a means to deliver a service to a customer. Companies own the molecules and consumers lease the services, creating incentives for industry to use as little energy and material as possible, minimize waste, and design for disassembly and reuse. – Stronger partnerships with and greater engagement of communities to support and cultivate local economies. This vision of sustainability in 2050 is epitomized by the following… There is widespread understanding and acceptance that health, economic and social progress are all dependent on a healthy biosphere: The world’s population is stabilized at a level that is within the short- and long-term carrying capacity of the earth’s finite resources. The market is the servant in aligning social, economic and natural systems for mutual benefit and sustainability: • The throughput of fossil fuels and materials in the economy is dramatically reduced. Non-polluting, renewable energy provides the vast majority of the world’s energy. • Energy and resource productivity is ten times greater than that of the year 2000. • mirror, learn from and live within natural We systems: nature as mentor, model and measure. • The industrial economy operates on renewable energy in a cyclical manner. This eliminates the concept of waste, since all industrial outputs will be a raw material or technical nutrient for other industrial operations or will go back into the cycles of nature. • use renewable resources at a rate less than We or equal to the natural environment’s ability to regenerate the resource, and preserve the diversity and integrity of the earth’s ecosystem services. This means living off nature’s income, not its capital, by practicing sustainable forestry, sustainable fishing “ trong, healthy, culturally diverse S and environmentally sustainable local communities are the goal of economic and social policy.” Transportation, land use and sustainable communities: • Low energy-consuming/-polluting systems now represent half of all transportation means. • Mass transportation and other mobility options are available to half the world’s population, and 90 percent of automobiles, trucks and buses are powered by non-polluting sources, e.g., electricity produced by renewable energy or sustainably produced biofuels. 29 • Sprawl is declining because innercities have been revitalized to make business and jobs accessible to innercity residents through enhanced public transportation, bicycling or walking infrastructure. • Planning, design and development of transportation infrastructure always address the unique challenges confronted by the impoverished, as well as by citizens with special needs.
  29. 29. chapter 1 CAMPUS Leadership | White Paper • Strong, healthy, culturally diverse and environmentally sustainable local communities are the goal of economic and social policy. Equity, democracy, peace and security: • Government and institutional policies foster intra-generational and intergenerational equity and peace. • The world literacy rate is 90 percent. Women have the same opportunities for education as men. • The majority of people worldwide have access to jobs that provide for basic human needs and family stability. Women and men enjoy equal access to jobs. • The gap between the richest 20percent of the population and the poorest has dropped from 70:1 to 7:1. • Resource consumption has been reduced by 75 percent in the industrialized world, and has increased sufficiently in developing countries to meet the needs of citizens. All consumption is done in a manner that minimizes the ecological footprint and improves the quality of life. • Non-material means are utilized to meet non-material needs, e.g., strong family/social relations, meaningful work, and achievement of higher aspirations. • Civic engagement and participatory, open democracy with full human rights are practiced by 75 percent of the world’s population. • Cultural diversity is respected and is once again increasing. • The lessons of environmental stewardship embedded in traditional wisdom and indigenous cultures have become ubiquitous knowledge and inspiration for industry, academe and government. 30 New measures of human and societal well-being: w w w. c l i m a t e n e u t r a l c a m p u s . c o m • New macroeconomic indicators to supplement Gross Domestic Product: – Adds environmental and social-cost side to growth ledger – Accounts for positive impact from non-monetary activity (e.g., parenting and volunteering) “ ach year, 3 million students E graduate from U.S. institutions of higher education —and millions more from international institutions —going on to make choices that guide and shape our society and economy.” • Indicators of well-being include health, economic vitality and equity, community stability, level of education, availability of affordable housing, equal access to transportation, and the condition of the natural and built environment. • Prices reflect all the social, health and environmental costs to society, as well as the direct costs and profits to the producers. • Taxes have been shifted from taxing “desirables”— income, investment, employment—to taxing “undesirables”—resource consumption and depletion, fossil fuel use, pollution, waste, and loss of biodiversity. • Signals of ecological distress are received in time to prevent or remedy damage to humans or the environment. Improved human health: • percent of the world has access to clean water, 90 sanitation and adequate nutritious food. • Waterborne infectious disease and AIDS have been eliminated as major causes of illness and death. • percent of the word’s population lives in areas 90 where the air quality is healthful. • percent of the world’s population has decent, 90 affordable housing. Globalization has been humanized, with the following results: • Technology leapfrogging for developing countries. • Support for democracy and human rights. • A rise in human aspirations. – Accounts for future as well as present well-being • Creation of more jobs for everyone. – Adjusts for income disparities. • Narrowing of the gap between rich and poor.
  30. 30. International governance has been reformed: • World Trade Organization: – Shows greater respect for health and environmental issues – Protects consumer right to know laws – Allows trade measures to protect global commons – Defers environmental decisions to environmental treaties. • Consideration of solving environmental and health problems is integral to World Bank and International Monetary Fund lending. • The United Nations has been reconstituted to be more democratic, and to be the chief peacekeeper and advocate for a just and sustainable world. The global climate has been restabilized: • The global climate has been restabilized and the concentration of atmospheric carbon dioxide has returned to safe levels below 350 parts per million. This has happened through a 90 percent reduction in fossil fuels and a 50 percent increase in forested land worldwide. Each year, 3 million students graduate from U.S. institutions of higher education—and millions more from international institutions—going on to make choices that guide and shape our society and economy. Their formal education is one crucial part of the solution to climate change and creation of the kind of healthy, just and sustainable society we envision today. In an effort to help society realize this vision, Second Nature, a leading non-profit organization with the mission to create a sustainable society by transforming higher education, was founded in 1993. Since its inception, Second Nature has been a driving force in creating and accelerating the Education for Sustainability movement, working collaboratively with colleges and universities and allies in other sectors to build strong networks within the sector and across sectors. Second Nature is the lead supporting organization of the American College University Presidents’ Climate Commitment (ACUPCC)—a national network of 675 colleges and universities implementing a successful, comprehensive strategy to accelerate progress toward climate neutrality and sustainability. To view references and sources please visit www.climateneutralcampus.com About the Author Anthony D. Cortese, one of the nation’s path-breaking leaders in greening higher education, is president and co-founder (with Senator John Kerry and Teresa Heinz) of Second Nature, a non-profit working to make healthy, just and sustainable action a first principle of higher education. He is the lead organizer of the ACUPCC, co-founder of the Association for the Advancement of Sustainability in Higher Education, and a consultant on institutionalizing sustainability principles and programs. He is former commissioner of the Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection and Tufts University dean of Environmental Programs (www.secondnature.org). 31
  31. 31. chapter 1 CAMPUS Leadership | White Paper Sustainable Spelman A selection from a convocation speech given on August 26, 2010 By Dr. Beverly Daniel Tatum, President of Spelman College The core of what I want to focus on today is in the title, liberal arts and sciences and the intellectual, creative, “Sustainable Spelman.” ethical and leadership development of its students. Spelman empowers the whole person to engage the The theme was inspired initially by three events: my many cultures of the world and inspires a commitment to attendance at the UNCF Building Green Institute in positive social change. San Antonio in June, where Spelman was highlighted as a leader among historically black colleges and How can we be a global leader in the education of universities for our environmental responsibility; women of African descent without paying attention to my experience watching helplessly for weeks this 32 summer as gallon after gallon of crude oil bubbled w w w. c l i m a t e n e u t r a l c a m p u s . c o m up from a deep sea well into the Gulf of Mexico, polluting coastal fishing waters and marshlands; and, most recently, reading Thomas Friedman’s book, Hot, Flat, and Crowded, as I know some of our first-year students have. Our mission at Spelman is very clear: Spelman College, a historically black college and a global leader in the education of women of African descent, is dedicated to academic excellence in the “ ow can we foster ethical H leadership without educating our students about environmental responsibility? How can we honestly engage the many cultures of the world without acknowledging the American overuse of the world’s resources?”
  32. 32. the global impact of our environmental choices? How can we foster ethical leadership without educating our students about environmental responsibility? How can we honestly engage the many cultures of the world without acknowledging the American overuse of the world’s resources? How can we inspire a commitment to positive social change without setting a clear institutional example ourselves? In the 19th century, our founders, Sophia Packard and Harriet Giles, said when they began creating this campus that they were “building for 100 years.” This “ e’ve been recognized by the W media, other higher education institutions, and even the Environmental Protection Agency, for our efforts—including our LEED-certified residence hall known as The Suites, the first building of its kind on an HBCU campus.” year we will celebrate the 130th anniversary of the founding of Spelman College, and we can see known as The Suites, the first building of its kind all around us evidence of their 100-year foresight. on an HBCU campus. We have been praised for our Now in the 21st century, we too have to take the “green” cleaning program using non-toxic cleaning long view, and think about the generations that supplies, our paperless business processes, and our are coming after us. beautiful, low-maintenance vegetation that is watered with recycled water from our cooling systems. As I mentioned, some of us at Spelman have been We’ve received grant funding from the Community reading Hot, Flat, and Crowded by Thomas Friedman. Foundation of Atlanta to conduct an energy audit of Friedman makes clear that we need to develop the Science Building, and from Home Depot to retrofit a sense of urgency about the environmental the heating and cooling systems so we can conserve degradation that is taking place around us. And if we energy in that building—the most energy-guzzling don’t step up—and teach our students to do so—we building on campus. We have reinstituted recycling, will all regret it. an effort started by faculty in the 1990s but in need of jump-starting again for this 21st century. To quote Thomas Friedman, These are all important efforts but they just scratch If we want to maintain…a habitable planet, rich the surface of what we could do and must do to with flora and fauna, leopards and lions, and human reduce our collective carbon footprint in order communities that can grow in a sustainable way—things to slow the tide of environmental degradation will have to change around here, and fast. occurring as a result of our overconsumption of the world’s resources. We are the first generation of Americans in the EnergyClimate Era. This is not about the whales anymore. It’s Because we can do more and must do more, I am about us. And what we do about the challenges of pleased to announce that yesterday I signed the energy and climate, conservation and preservation, American College University Presidents’ Climate will tell our kids who we really are… Commitment, joining more than 670 other college and university presidents who have signed. Now, Spelman has already made accomplishments in this area for which we have been recognized. An excerpt of the Climate Commitment follows: Environmental science and environmental studies are rapidly growing interests among the students “…colleges and universities must exercise leadership and faculty at Spelman. We’ve been recognized by in their communities and throughout society by the media, other higher education institutions, and modeling ways to minimize global warming emissions, even the Environmental Protection Agency, for our and by providing the knowledge and the educated efforts—including our LEED-certified residence hall graduates to achieve climate neutrality. Campuses 33
  33. 33. chapter 1 CAMPUS Leadership | White Paper that address the climate challenge by reducing global warming emissions and by integrating sustainability into their curriculum will better serve their students and meet their social mandate to help create a thriving, ethical and civil society. These colleges and universities will be providing students with the knowledge and skills needed to address the critical, systemic challenges faced by the world in this new century and enable them to benefit from the economic opportunities that will arise as a result of solutions they develop.” The Presidents’ Climate Commitment requires us to create a long-term plan—perhaps as long as 20 or 30 years—for achieving climate neutrality, and to report publicly on our progress on a regular basis. We know our efforts will be by necessity incremental, and our plan may be revised many times in the process, but we cannot in good conscience ignore the science that tells us we have to change our ways, and do it as quickly as we can. We often hear the phrase “think globally, act locally,” and indeed that is what attention to environmental sustainability requires us to do. The choices we make here at Spelman and in our daily lives have ripple effects not just at home but around the world. We must have an ethic of conservation on our campus. Our mission statement talks about ethical development, but what are ethics? Friedman writes, “Ethics are not laws. They are not imposed by the state. Rather they are norms, values, beliefs, habits and attitudes that are embraced voluntarily—that we as a society impose on ourselves. Laws regulate behavior from the outside in. Ethics regulate behavior from the inside out. Ethics are something 34 you carry with you wherever you go to guide whatever you do.” w w w. c l i m a t e n e u t r a l c a m p u s . c o m “ he choices we make here at T Spelman and in our daily lives have ripple effects not just at home but around the world. We must have an ethic of conservation on our campus.” “ n ethic of conservation requires A us to be good stewards of our resources now so that there will be resources available in the future —not only for us but also for those who will come after us.” Or to say it differently, ethics are what you do even when no one else is watching. In Hot, Flat, and Crowded, Friedman quotes Michael Sandel, a political philosopher at Harvard, who describes an ethic of conservation as “an ethic of restraint,” understanding that we cannot just use our natural resources as though they were limitless. An ethic of conservation requires us to be good stewards of our resources now so that there will be resources available in the future—not only for us but also for those who will come after us. The vision of a Sustainable Spelman requires all of us to adopt an ethic of conservation. A couple of years ago we faced a severe drought in Atlanta. The reservoir was down so low that it was said there was a water supply of less than 90 days. At that time, we launched a water conservation campaign on campus, and the governor stood on the steps of the Capitol Building and publicly prayed for rain. It did eventually rain, and the reservoir filled back up, and some of us went back to our old habits. But the fact is that we still live in a place that has a limited water supply and a rapidly growing population. We have to have an ethic of conservation for our own sake, and for the sake of others.
  34. 34. About the Author Dr. Beverly Daniel Tatum has served as president of Spelman College since 2002. Her tenure as president has been marked by a period of great innovation and growth. Spelman College, long recognized as the leading educator of women of African descent, is now ranked among the top 100 liberal arts colleges in the nation. An accomplished administrator, Dr. Tatum is also widely recognized as a race relations expert and leader in higher education. In 2005, Dr. Tatum was awarded the prestigious Brock International Prize in Education for her innovative leadership in the field. Her bestselling titles include Can We Talk About Race? And Other Conversations in an Era of School Resegregation (2007) and Why Are All the Black Kids Sitting Together in the Cafeteria? And Other Conversations About Race (1997). She is also the author of Assimilation Blues: Black Families in White Communities: Who Succeeds and Why? (1987). She holds a B.A. degree in psychology from Wesleyan University, and an M.A. and Ph.D. in clinical psychology from the University of Michigan. She also holds an M.A. in religious studies from Hartford Seminary. She has served as a faculty member at the University of California at Santa Barbara, Westfield State College and Mount Holyoke College, where she also served as dean and acting president. 35
  35. 35. chapter 1 CAMPUS Leadership | White Paper The People Side of Performance Contracting Leverage the interaction between people and their environment to promote participation in the energy-efficiency process By Dr. Scott Finlinson, NORESCO Educating students to be global, ethical leaders Energy savings performance contracting is a turnkey must involve knowledge about the global impact of service that provides a comprehensive set of energy- our energy decisions. From a cultural perspective, efficiency and conservation measures, with guarantees acknowledging that we Americans are relatively that the savings produced by the service will fund heavy consumers of the Earth’s limited resources— the project. Hence, the energy savings performance and then doing something about it—helps students contract (ESPC) is a “walking-the-talk” example of an develop a global perspective on environmental institution doing its part to ensure the sustainability stewardship, aiding them in their interactions with people of other cultures on this issue. In addition, 36 when teachers and staff work on an environmentally w w w. c l i m a t e n e u t r a l c a m p u s . c o m responsible campus, environmental education will be better received. Therefore, encouraging individual and institutional energy efficiency and conservation has substantial overlap with many college and university mission statements. Encouragement and education are enhanced when the institution or organization sets a clear example. One way to achieve such an example in these tough economic times is through a performance contracting framework. “ ORESCO’s holistic approach N toward performance contracting leverages the complex interaction between people and their environment in an effort to promote participation in the energy-efficiency process.”
  36. 36. of the campus for future generations while reducing its environmental footprint. While some may stop at building retrofits utilizing efficient technologies and procedures, we believe that all organizational members should participate in this innovative energy initiative to maximize and sustain the many economic, environmental, social and educational benefits of the ESPC project. Therefore, we suggest that any institution considering an ESPC seek out a service provider that is proficient at both engineering “ y changing the institutional B way of life to a more ‘conserving’ culture, an enhanced use of old, inefficient technologies can be combined with the use of new technologies to play a role in the total energy savings achieved.” efficiencies and behavior-change solutions. The Awareness-Communication component begins NORESCO’s holistic approach toward performance by informing all organizational members about contracting leverages the complex interaction the purpose and benefits of the ESPC project, between people and their environment in an effort communicating the changes that can be expected to promote participation in the energy-efficiency to result from the project, and providing a means process. To achieve optimal benefit from newly by which questions, concerns and/or suggestions installed high-efficiency equipment and systems—in can be addressed directly to the project manager. addition to generating additional energy savings over Next, information about the benefits of the project and above those achieved by efficient technologies— is disseminated on a larger scale. This information NORESCO creates a comprehensive, custom program is designed to enhance both internal and external known as the Energy Conservation Through Behavior perceptions of the institution, a process that can lead Change® (ECTBC) program. Educational institutions to multiple positive outcomes. have followed its principles and proprietary design to accomplish change on campus. Communicating this enhanced environmental stewardship of the Earth’s resources, along with an The program is composed of four overlapping increased competitive advantage (due to enhanced, components: (1) a Human Behavior Energy Audit® smart buildings), can bolster confidence by staff assessment; (2) Awareness-Communication; and faculty that they are employed by a sustainable (3) Sustainable Behavior Change; and (4) Green institution. Existing students report higher Schoolhouse Curriculum Enhancement. Using satisfaction with their chosen institution, while high the inherent opportunity to “go green” within school students now consider the “greenness” of an performance contracting, the ECTBC program instills institution when deciding what college or university and sustains a culture of energy efficiency, with to attend. In essence, since reducing pollution, resulting impacts on campus, and throughout the decreasing natural-resource consumption, and local community and beyond. increasing operational efficiency are so well-received, Utilizing archival data, individual meetings, focus groups and a behavioral survey, our Human Behavior we communicate this project’s activities to the widest possible audience. Energy Audit (HBEA) assessment is designed to The central aspect of sustainability is widespread identify existing mechanisms that can help target behavior change. NORESCO knows that the energy for change impactful, energy-wasting behaviors. It savings realized by installing energy-efficient also guides strategies designed to enhance energy devices and systems are only a fraction of the total consumption knowledge and promote other energy possible savings that can be realized institution-wide. efficiencies. Assessment is key to our program, so the Regardless of old, inefficient technology or new, HBEA further serves as a baseline from which to gauge efficient technology, energy conservation begins with program effectiveness and then guide modifications. 37
  37. 37. chapter 1 CAMPUS Leadership | White Paper the building occupants. Changing the behavior of effectiveness in each iteration. As a result, the Energy building occupants not only increases the total energy Conservation Through Behavior Change program, savings, but also leverages the savings generated in conjunction with other existing sustainability by the newly installed energy-efficient devices and activities, gradually changes the campus culture systems. By changing the institutional way of life to to a conserving way of life, taking full advantage of a more “conserving” culture, an enhanced use of old, the substantial and numerous benefits this type of inefficient technologies can be combined with the use change can bring to the college or university, the of new technologies to play a role in the total energy community and society at large. savings achieved. Changing the culture by changing behavior, and sustaining that change over time, can Deployed concurrently with Sustainable Behavior make the ESPC more effective and rewarding than Change is the Green Schoolhouse Curriculum other conservation initiatives implemented. Enhancement component. It features hands-on educational activities for students (often created The Sustainable Behavior Change component from the building retrofits) and strengthens academic consists of a scientifically rigorous and well- learning. In this way, students also participate in the documented process designed by the author that is performance contract while utilizing project-based implemented in conjunction and cooperation with instruction and tools to become better environmental staff, faculty and students. The process initially stewards. With specially designed class projects, measures behaviors, knowledge, attitudes, social students may also bring family and community into norms, perceptions of control, and other energy-use the energy-efficiency process. The holistic approach factors among members of the focal community. affects all stakeholders through a well-received Assessing these factors allows us to create a custom and comprehensive initiative—that of saving money, behavioral intervention for the focal members using energy and carbon emissions while upgrading existing mechanisms that already exist and are functioning structures—all paid for through energy savings. within the community. Multiple indicators confirm that the Energy Additionally, assessing change within these energy Conservation Through Behavior Change program consumption factors (using pre-/post-intervention is effective. For example, in a treatment versus data) guides future program modification. Energy control experimental study conducted at a mid-sized Conservation Through Behavior Change® is a university in Pennsylvania, energy conservation dynamic program, and therefore is modified after behaviors increased among students living in each intervention period prior to subsequent the residence hall in which our program was implementations. In this way, specific components implemented, as compared to a control hall. Energy of the process can be modified, added or deleted conservation awareness, perceived control and based on current situational needs and demonstrated knowledge expanded, while attitudes and social efficiencies. This leads to improved program norms improved. Pre-program versus post-program metered utility data demonstrate a building-level 38 w w w. c l i m a t e n e u t r a l c a m p u s . c o m “ he holistic approach impacts T all stakeholders through a wellreceived and comprehensive initiative—that of saving money, energy and carbon emissions while upgrading existing structures—all paid for through energy savings.” decrease of 9 percent in electricity consumption (Graph 1) and a building-level decrease of 22 percent in water consumption (Graph 2). In a recent assessment at another university without building-level meters, pre- versus post-program selfreport energy conservation behaviors increased an average of 17 percent (Graph 3). Interestingly, even though only four behaviors were targeted for change, all energy conservation behaviors assessed
  38. 38. raph 1 G Comparison of metered electricity usage before ECTBC implementation and after ECTBC implementation (presented in kilowatt hours per student per week) measured a decline in usage of 9 percent. raph 2 G Comparison of metered water usage before ECTBC implementation and after ECTBC implementation measured a decline of 22 percent. 39 Graph 3 Comparison of self-reported energy conservation behaviors showed an increase of 17 percent, including behaviors that were not targeted for change.
  39. 39. chapter 1 CAMPUS Leadership | White Paper “ n summary, considering I the people element of energy efficiency and structuring cognitive programs around focal groups can boost the effectiveness of performance contracting along multiple dimensions.” moved in the desired direction, demonstrating the added value of a holistic approach that combines building retrofit energy efficiencies with a custom behavior-change program. In summary, considering the people element of energy efficiency and structuring cognitive programs around focal groups can boost the effectiveness of performance contracting along multiple dimensions. About the Author 40 w w w. c l i m a t e n e u t r a l c a m p u s . c o m Dr. Scott Finlinson, PhD., the creator of the Energy Conservation Through Behavior Change® program, has personally implemented and managed custom, sustainable behavior-change programs at colleges, universities, K–12 school districts, and state and county governments with success in both self-reported and metered results. He holds a Ph.D. in industrial–organizational psychology from Ohio University, and leads NORESCO’s behavior-change initiatives. NORESCO specializes in the development, design, construction, financing and operation of energy and environmental efficiency projects, performance contracting and central energy plants. NORESCO is a subsidiary of Carrier Corp, which is a unit of United Technologies Corp. (NYSE:UTX).
  40. 40. chapter 1 CAMPUS Leadership | White Paper Using SustainabilityFocused Learning on Higher-Education Campuses to Benefit Our Communities A member of the Quapaw tribe of Oklahoma relates his experience researching the most economical and feasible renewable resource for his tribe’s energy needs as a part of his internship program By Brandon Bandy, Haskell Indian Nations University In the summer of 2011 I took part in the Haskell Environmental Research Studies (HERS) internship, on the Haskell Indian Nations University campus. One of the goals of the internship is to give native students an opportunity to gain research experience. This internship also pairs students with graduatelevel mentors from the University of Kansas to help them succeed with their project and learn more about graduate school. 42 w w w. c l i m a t e n e u t r a l c a m p u s . c o m While reviewing material about renewable resources on tribal land, I found a quote from the intertribalcoup.org that illustrates the importance of investing in renewable energy for tribes: “Up to ninety cents of every dollar the Tribes spend on energy leaves immediately—lost forever to all of the economic leverage and benefits this money could create within tribal communities.” For my project I decided to research the energy use of my tribe, and the renewable resource potential of the Quapaw tribal jurisdictional area. My research question was “Can the Quapaw tribe benefit from renewable resources?” In my attempt to answer this question I first determined the Quapaw tribe’s energy use and second researched energy potential and the cost of equipment necessary to make use of this energy. To determine the energy use of the Quapaw tribe, I called the tribal building to speak with the tribal administrator about reviewing tribal utility bills. After receiving permission, I drove to the tribal building and reviewed the utility bills to compile them. “ p to ninety cents of every dollar U the Tribes spend on energy leaves immediately—lost forever to all of the economic leverage and benefits this money could create within tribal communities.”

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