Sustainable_Campuses Building Green at Minority-Serving Institutions Kresge Foundation UNCF
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Sustainable_Campuses Building Green at Minority-Serving Institutions Kresge Foundation UNCF

Sustainable_Campuses Building Green at Minority-Serving Institutions Kresge Foundation UNCF

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Sustainable_Campuses Building Green at Minority-Serving Institutions Kresge Foundation UNCF Sustainable_Campuses Building Green at Minority-Serving Institutions Kresge Foundation UNCF Document Transcript

  • Sustainable Campuses Building Green at Minority-Serving Institutions
  • Dear Colleagues: Welcome to Sustainable Campuses: Building Green at Minority-Serving Institutions, a resource developed by the Building Green project of UNCF’s Institute for Capacity Building. Sustainable Campuses is a collaboration of UNCF and our MSI partners: the American Indian Higher Education Consortium, the Hispanic Association of Colleges and Universities, and the Thurgood Marshall College Fund. We are also fortunate to be partnering on this initiative with the nation’s leader in the field of environmental sustainability in colleges and universities, Second Nature. And all of us owe a debt of gratitude to the Kresge Foundation, whose support and thought leadership have made this project not only possible, but successful. We think of Sustainable Campuses as a convening. As we did at the Building Green conferences over the past year, we have brought together educational and environmental innovators and encouraged them to share their ideas, their experiences, their lessons learned and their best practices. Conserving resources is part of the DNA of Minority-Serving Institutions, part of our historic commitment to serve students from low- and moderateincome families. So it comes naturally to MSIs to do more with less, whether “less” is financial resources or natural resources. It is also part of MSIs’ DNA to instill in students the attitudes and values of good citizenship, both by including them in our curricula and setting good examples of institutional citizenship. Our green example will help our students grow up to be a green generation and responsible stewards of the environment. By reading this book, by thinking about how you and your institution might benefit from the projects these articles describe, and by acting on your convictions, you become part of the solution. Thank you for that. Sincerely, 2 w w w. c l i m a t e n e u t r a l c a m p u s . c o m Michael L. Lomax President and CEO
  • Table of Contents Chapter 1 Campus Leadership sustainable campuses Building Green at Minority-Serving Institutions Editor in Chief Melissa Daley Production and Design Brazen Graphics Printer Teldon Print Media UNCF Building Green at Minority-Serving Institutions_________ 8 By Felicia M. Davis, UNCF Education for Sustainability Blueprint_______________________ 12 By Georges Dyer on behalf of Second Nature Organizing for a Successful Green Initiative: Wilberforce University_ ____________________________________ 18 Case Study by Nodie M. Washington, Ph.D., Special Assistant to the President In Collaboration with UNCF President and CEO  Dr. Michael L. Lomax Green For All Ambassadors: Working to Build a Green Future_ ___________________________ 22 _ Senior VP of Academic Programs and Strategic Initiatives  Karl W. Reid, Ed.D. Greening Howard University________________________________ 26 By Phaedra Ellis-Lamkins, CEO, Green For All By Illai Kenney, Howard University National Director, Communications and Brand Strategy Louis Barbash Interim Executive Director, ICB Clarissa Myrick-Harris, Ph.D Director, FIEP Building Green Initiative Felicia Davis Program Associate Darryl Ann Lai-Fang Published By Kyoto Publishing Suite L200 560 Beatty Street Vancouver, BC Canada, V6B 2L3 ISBN 978-0-9813326-4-2 Visions of Sustainability in 2050____________________________28 By Anthony D. Cortese, Sc.D., Second Nature Sustainable Spelman_______________________________________ 32 By Dr. Beverly Daniel Tatum, President of Spelman College The People Side of Performance Contracting_ _______________ 36 By Dr. Scott Finlinson, NORESCO Using Sustainability-Focused Learning on Higher-Education Campuses to Benefit Our Communities_____42 By Brandon Bandy, Haskell Indian Nations University Integrating Indigenous Principles of Sustainability into Higher Education______________________________________46 By Dr. Daniel R. Wildcat, Haskell Indian Nations University Minority-Serving Institutions: Harbingers of Education for Sustainability___________________50 By Dr. Fatemeh Shafiei, Spelman College 3
  • Table of Contents cont. Chapter 2 Finances Bridging the Gap Between Higher Education and Community Engagement___________________________________ 56 Case Study by Sharon Campbell, SYNERGY GROUP, and Henry M. Lancaster II, Lancaster Craig & Associates The entire content of this publication is protected by copyright, full details are available from the publisher. All rights are reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system or transmitted in any other form or by any means— electronic, photocopying, recording or otherwise—without prior written permission of the copyright holder. While every effort has been made to ensure accuracy of the content of this book, the publisher will accept no responsibility for any errors or omissions, or for any loss or damage, consequential or otherwise, suffered as a result of any material published herein. The publisher assumes no responsibility for statements made by advertisers in business competition, nor assumes responsibility for statements/opinions expressed or implied in the articles of this publication. 4 w w w. c l i m a t e n e u t r a l c a m p u s . c o m The viewpoints expressed in the following articles are those of the authors and do not represent the views of UNCF or Kyoto Publishing. No endorsement, implied or expressed is made. These articles represent a collection of viewpoints by various parties and are intended to promote discussion on sustainability. © 2012 By Kyoto Publishing All rights reserved. Published March 2012 Minority-Serving Institutions Championing the American College & University Presidents’ Climate Commitment_ ______58 _ By Ashka Naik on behalf of Second Nature University of Maryland, Baltimore___________________________ 62 Case Study by Comverge Going Green—A Rural Regional Perspective During a Period of Diminishing Resources_ __________________64 _ By Robert Gaines, Elizabeth City State University Environmental Defense Fund Helps Campuses Save Energy and Money—and Protect Human Health______________________ 70 Case Study by Marilynn Marsh-Robinson, Environmental Defense Fund Xavier University Partners With Siemens for Ten-Year Energy Performance Contract__________________ 72 Case Study by Curtis Brown, Siemens Industry Inc.
  • Chapter 3 Facilities Greening from the Inside-Out: How Sustainability Can Transform Your Campus _____________ 78 By Jaime Van Mourik, Center for Green Schools at the U.S. Green Building Council Water Reclamation and Reuse: Extending the Life Cycle of Water___________________________82 Case Study by Daniel Allison and Peter Varga, Organica Water Inc. HVAC Risk Analysis Can Improve Performance and Reduce Costs_ ________________________________________86 _ By Bill Harris, Trane Intelligent Energy Management_____________________________90 White Paper by Comverge Universities: Leaders of the Sustainability Movement_________98 By Melissa McDonald, Organica Water Inc. University of Central Missouri_____________________________ 102 Case Study by Trane CyberONE: A Sustainable and Catalyst Solution for Higher Education Today_______________ 106 By Marcela Oliva, Los Angeles Community College District Cheyney University Teams with NORESCO to Save Energy_ ____________________________110 _ Case Study by David Robb, Senior Account Executive, NORESCO 5
  • Chapter Campus leadership Minority-serving colleges and universities are actively creating a culture of sustainability across their campuses and throughout their communities. Sustainability leaders can be found among administrators, faculty and students. These leaders know that by educating and empowering all stakeholders, on campus and in the surrounding communities, they can strengthen and expand the move toward a more sustainable, green global culture and economy. Education workshops and campus sustainability campaigns are raising awareness and motivating others to take part in actively incorporating sustainability principles into their everyday lives.
  • chapter 1 CAMPUS Leadership | White Paper UNCF Building Green at Minority-Serving Institutions UNCF has joined with a broad range of education sustainability and climate-change organizations to promote green initiatives on minority-serving higher education campuses By Felicia M. Davis, UNCF 8 w w w. c l i m a t e n e u t r a l c a m p u s . c o m With climate change and sustainable development topping the Millennium Project list of “Global Challenges for Humanity,” minority-serving colleges and universities are uniquely positioned to emerge as leaders in the transition to a green economy. The UNCF Building Green at Minority-Serving Institutions (MSIs) Initiative is leading the charge to transform 20th-century campus infrastructures into living, learning laboratories that foster academic excellence and technological innovation needed to solve complex social, economic and environmental problems. The Building Green Initiative has established a diverse network of historically black, Hispanicserving, tribal and Asian Pacific Islander institutions motivated to advance campus-wide sustainability. The network fosters bold, forward-looking agendas that reach beyond traditional campus boundaries to expand access to information and forge valuable town and gown collaboration. Regarding equity as an economic and ecological imperative, the Building Green network is a dynamic force for change made up of individuals who share collective responsibility for the well-being of future generations, honoring the highest ideals of justice and human rights. As an agent of change, the Building Green mindset rejects inefficiency and wasteful depletion of natural resources, promoting instead conservation, environmental protection and restoration. “ he Building Green Initiative  T has established a diverse network of historically black, Hispanicserving, tribal and Asian Pacific Islander institutions motivated to advance campus-wide sustainability.”
  • Campus-wide sustainability requires a major paradigm shift deconstructing well-defined disciplinary silos and moving beyond interdisciplinary frameworks to a supra-disciplinary conceptual framework that draws from and integrates insights from all disciplines. Multi-stakeholder collaboration is on the rise, generating refreshing new frames, big ideas and truly innovative approaches to sustainability. Culturally inspired solutions range from the resurrection of indigenous foods among tribal college communities to a creative proposal to engage historically black college and university (HBCU) students in greening Martin Luther King, Jr. boulevards nationwide. Credit for the success of the initiative belongs to individuals, institutions and organizations that came together to make the learning institutes, training workshops, online dialogues and other partner activities a success. Spelman facilities director Arthur Frazier helped to refine the UNCF approach to training to ensure integration with leading higher education sustainability organizations, particularly Second Nature, U.S. Green Building Council and Association for the Advancement of Sustainability in Higher Education. This approach increased access to resources, cultivated productive partnerships and contributed to the development of organizational programs that address specific MSI needs. Guided by President Beverly Tatum’s vision for a sustainable institution, Spelman is a sustainability leader, role model and resource, especially for small private institutions seeking to green their institutions. UNCF, together with our partners (American Indian Higher Education Consortium, Hispanic Association of Colleges and Universities, Thurgood Marshall College Fund and Second Nature) helps MSIs incorporate principles of sustainable design and energy efficiency into campus building projects and other sustainability efforts. Increasing the number of buildings and structures on MSI campuses that register for and achieve Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) certification and increasing the number of MSI signatories to the American College & University Presidents’ Climate Commitment (ACUPCC) remain defining goals for the Initiative. Open to all MSIs, Building Green Learning Institutes address a broad range of campus sustainability and green building topics. Three two-day regional “ he Building Green Initiative T also supported the development of campus sustainability plans by awarding grants to 23 MSIs. This investment has generated impressive results.” learning institutes were held in Atlanta, Minneapolis and San Antonio. A national learning institute was held in June 2011 in Washington, DC. The national convening attracted significant participation from key federal agencies responsible for advancing minority institutions, energy efficiency and environmental sustainability. Invited participants included facilities directors, campus planners, sustainability officers, business managers, chief academic officers and presidents. Anthony Cortese, Antonio Flores, Dr. Daniel Wildcat, David Orr, Jerome Ringo, John Wilson, Joseph Lowery, Majora Carter, Nancy Sutley, Paul Rowland, Robert Stanton, Roger Rivera, Tom Goldtooth, William Moses, and Winnona LaDuke are among the thought leaders who generously shared insights, information and experience with learning institute participants. Presidents Verna Fowler, College of Menomonee Nation; Carlton Brown, Clark Atlanta University; Beverly Tatum, Spelman College; Beverly Hogan, Tougaloo College; Wesley McClure, Lane College and Elizabeth City State University Chancellor Willie Gilchrist each contributed to shaping long-range program goals. As a follow-up to learning institutes and to provide strategies for addressing specific challenges, UNCF developed a series of one-day training workshops to support LEED exam preparation, climate action planning, auditing and greenhouse gas inventories. The Building Green Initiative also supported the development of campus sustainability plans by awarding grants to 23 MSIs. This investment has generated impressive results. In addition to completing climate action plans and establishing green committees, sustainability activities are under way in virtually every corner of the academy including: administration, building, energy, recycling, dining, student involvement, transportation and instruction. 9
  • chapter 1 CAMPUS Leadership | White Paper UNCF teamed with the Sustainable Endowments Institute to conduct a sustainability survey of participating MSIs. The trailblazing MSI Green Report, featuring responses from 52 institutions from 24 states plus the commonwealth of Puerto Rico and the territory of Guam, profiles activities already under way at MSIs. Representing nearly half of all network participants, survey respondents educate more than a quarter-million students annually. Building Green Advisory Committee working groups have been established to focus on key areas of interest. Buildings and infrastructure, curriculum and faculty development, student involvement and community engagement are established areas of interest for the Building Green Initiative. Health and wellness, alternative energy research, and global sustainability issues are additional topics raised by Advisory Committee members. Dr. Richard Gragg of Florida A&M University, is helping to shape the working group communication process that will facilitate greater collaboration. Educating the MSI community about the impacts and implications of climate change is an important program priority. The American Indian and Alaska Native Climate Change Working Group brings together native and non-native scholars working on climate mitigation and adaptation, energy, sustainability and resource management, with a focus on climate change education and research at tribal colleges and universities. Working Group convener, Dr. Daniel Wildcat—an indigenous knowledge, environment, and education scholar—welcomed the UNCF Building Green Initiative as an active participant. Haskell University, a Building Green grantee, started its first recycling program, hosted an indigenous foods conference and will host a major tribal college sustainability conference leading up to the Rio +20 Earth Summit June 2012. 10 w w w. c l i m a t e n e u t r a l c a m p u s . c o m One of the more ambitious proposals advanced by a Building Green grantee involves the creation of a state of the art energy lab that would house the Clark Atlanta Center for Alternative, Renewable Energy, Technology and Training (CARET2). The Center is envisioned as an energy hub where engineers and scientists can engage in cutting-edge research; an incubator that contributes to commercialization; and a facility that supports collaboration between the Atlanta University Center and national laboratories. The design includes laboratories and support facilities for research in energy, materials, biotechnology, computational science and engineering as well as several multipurpose facilities such as a museum, reading and lecture rooms, and a greenhouse that would be open to the public. The museum would include a Climate Theater a concept advanced by the Climate Institute that incorporates hands-on, community-based, expo-style exhibits that will educate the community about climate change. Other grantee accomplishments, include the establishment of a senior-level sustainability director position at Elizabeth City State University (North Carolina), the first campus to sign the ACUPCC as a part of the Building Green Network; an energy efficiency housing competition that can be replicated in reservation housing at United Tribes Technical College (North Dakota); a parking survey at California State University-Northridge that will lead to reduced idling and lower emissions at the large commuter campus; a sustainable student lifestyle proposal integrating health and wellness from Tougaloo University; a comprehensive plan for infrastructure upgrades at Wilberforce University; and student engagement projects underway at Delaware State, Howard and University of Texas-San Antonio are among the many outcomes from the Kresge-funded sustainability planning grants. The Green For All HBCU Ambassador Program, US Green Building Council (USGBC) Georgia Chapter, National Wildlife Federation Campus Ecology program, and Environmental Defense Fund (EDF) Climate Corps Fellows Program have all partnered with the Building Green Initiative to expand campus sustainability activities at MSIs. Building Green partnerships leverage available resources to expand student involvement, energy audits, LEED training and provide free or discounted services. EDF will deploy Climate Fellows to several UNCF grantee institutions this summer and USGBC Georgia has spearheaded a pilot program to create a learning track for HBCU students that includes placement on LEED projects, an experience required for LEED AP certification. The UN Habitat-sponsored Africa Green Teams is also working to connect young eco-entrepreneurs in Kenya, Rwanda, Uganda and Senegal with HBCU students in the US. The business community, large and small, has been an important Building Green partner. Trane, Wells Fargo, Federal Express, NORESCO, Organica, Siemens
  • and Comverge have supported the program along with Woodline Solutions, Integral Group, Herman Russell, Lancaster Craig and Associates, and the Laminin Group which have provided technical support and resources. UNCF is seeking cloud-based analytics software or dashboard applications that can be used to measure and optimize energy, carbon, waste and water to pilot a program under review by Building Green grantee Lane College. A project goal is to create a user-friendly affordable process to accurately map MSI energy use, emissions and monitor reductions through 2020. Sharing information and tools for advancing sustainability is a high priority and financing for green building, retrofits and sustainable projects is one of the greatest needs identified by network participants. Financing sustainability is a significant challenge for MSIs; the website buildinggreennetwork.org provides links and drives traffic to tools provided on the ACUPCC website. The Building Green Initiative is working with the U.S. Department of Energy, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, U.S. Department of Interior and other governmental agencies to educate MSIs about doing business with the federal government. The Initiative will work with interested federal agencies to produce and promote webinars on energy efficiency, renewable energy technology and various environmental sustainability topics. With strong support from the Kresge Foundation the UNCF Building Green Initiative has been instrumental in increasing the number of MSI signatories to the ACUPCC and advancing LEED as a framework for sustainability planning. Promoting interdisciplinary approaches to environmental studies and curriculum, the program also cultivates student leadership as part of a comprehensive effort to help MSIs leapfrog over outdated, inefficient, wasteful technologies, values and mindsets to becoming global sustainability leaders. About the Author Felicia M. Davis directs the UNCF Institute for Capacity Building Facilities and Infrastructure Enhancement Program, where she oversees implementation of the $1.8 million Kresge Foundation funded Building Green at Minority-Serving Institutions initiative. Davis works to advance sustainability at historically black, Hispanicserving, and tribal college and universities with a goal of reducing institutional carbon footprints and moving aggressively toward carbon-neutral campuses. She is especially proud of her work with the African Green Teams, a UN Habitat sponsored program to develop young eco-entrepreneurs and connect the teams with interested HBCU students. The UNCF Building Green Initiative seeks to help catapult HBCUs and other minority-serving institutions into leadership roles in the transition to a green economy. UNCF Building Green Initiative program partners include Thurgood Marshall College Fund, the Hispanic Association of Colleges and Universities, the American Indian Higher Education Consortium and Second Nature. 11
  • chapter 1 CAMPUS Leadership | White Paper Education for Sustainability Blueprint Even with colleges and universities committed to sustainability, the sector as a whole needs a blueprint to ensure that creating a sustainable culture is a strategic imperative of higher education By Georges Dyer on behalf of Second Nature 12 In 2010, a critical mass of the leading organizations that support Education for Sustainability (EfS) in the U.S. higher education sector came together to create a blueprint to map out the best strategies for accelerating their efforts, collaborating effectively, and supporting each other in meeting their common goals. The process was supported by funding from the Garfield Foundation and the Kresge Foundation, and was coordinated by Second Nature and the Campaign for Environmental Literacy. w w w. c l i m a t e n e u t r a l c a m p u s . c o m More than 40 organizations were invited to participate throughout the year, and on November 29, 2010 representatives from 23 of these organizations convened, to create the EfS (Education for Sustainability) Blueprint. The premise for the meeting was that systemic change in higher education requires tackling many leverage points simultaneously and in a collaborative manner. After an assessment of the movement’s recent progress and a review of new and upcoming “ olleges and universities have C made tremendous progress, particularly over the last five years, in recognizing the importance and urgency of the sustainability challenge, and in taking significant action.” initiatives planned by the participating organizations, the group collectively created a list of the most important next steps, followed by self-identified teams that would continue to work in many of these critical areas. Indicators of progress Colleges and universities have made tremendous progress, particularly over the last five years, in recognizing the importance and urgency of the sustainability challenge, and in taking significant
  • action. While there are few hard metrics and no comprehensive national assessment of the state of sustainability in higher education, the following are 13 encouraging indicators of progress (as of November 2010): 1.  total of 675 college and university presidents A have signed the American College & University Presidents’ Climate Commitment (ACUPCC). 2.  The Association for the Advancement of Sustainability in Higher Education now has 1,100 institutional members (800 universities and colleges) and has attracted 2,200 participants to its 2010 conference. 3.  More than 113 new academic degree programs in sustainability (not counting new certificate programs) have been established. 4.  More than 1,100 inter-disciplinary degree programs in the environment now exist. 5.  Campus sustainability staffing is on the rise, adding about 400 new positions each year. 6.  More than 70 new sustainability centers have opened on campuses. 7.  There are 905 LEED-certified campus buildings (and 3,000+ registered with LEED). 8.  Greenhouse gas emissions inventories were reported by 547 campuses, and 330 have submitted climate action plans to the ACUPCC. 9.  full 240 institutions are participating in the A Sustainability Tracking, Assessment & Rating System (STARS). 10.  ustainability education was recognized in federal S law for the first time through the creation of the University Sustainability Program in the Higher Education Opportunity Act, followed by the Sustainability Education Summit: Citizenship and Pathways for a Green Economy hosted by the U.S. Department of Education in September 2010. 11.  The Energy Action Coalition has effectively stopped 130 proposed new coal plants. 12.  stimates are that 40 – 60 percent of campuses E have implemented trayless dining. 13.  he national RecycleMania competition is now held T on 510 campuses. Although anecdotal evidence points to a great deal of progress, more in-depth planning and stakeholder “ lthough anecdotal evidence points A to a great deal of progress, more in-depth planning and stakeholder education are still needed on a vast majority of campuses.” education are still needed on a vast majority of campuses. Many initiatives operate in isolation from each other rather than as part of a master plan, thereby limiting their ability to make the deep institutional changes necessary to create sustainable campuses. Progress is greater in “greening” campus buildings, grounds and operations than in educating stakeholders, and there are few, if any, indicators that this generation of college graduates on average is any more literate about sustainability than previous generations. In sum, the level of transformation required to truly meet the challenge of creating a sustainable society is such that current efforts still fall short of reaching the necessary tipping point to establish sustainability as a core goal of the higher education sector. Major gaps To reach this critical point, the following objectives must be addressed: 1. Engage institutions with their communities Tremendous win–win achievements can occur when colleges and universities team up with their host communities to tackle common sustainability challenges, especially those that help improve local quality of life and create jobs. In the process, faculty have the chance to apply their knowledge and skills to pressing local issues; students receive hands-on, real-world experience (good for their motivation as well as their résumés); the university gains goodwill and positive press; and the community receives inspiration, free labor and cutting-edge expertise. Once sufficient university engagement of this kind takes place, faculty members recognize the need to reshape the curriculum to become more interdisciplinary and oriented around real-world challenges. And in the best of cases, institutions then start to function as integrated learning communities. While examples abound of successful “engaged university” projects, a major initiative is needed to take these models to scale nationally. 13
  • chapter 1 CAMPUS Leadership | White Paper 2. Increase faculty and staff resources To reach a sufficient percentage of the nation’s higher education faculty and staff, large-scale faculty and staff training efforts will be required, and the following programs would be helpful: •  accessible, interactive resource center (i.e., a An “knowledge machine”); •  Toolkits with manageable goals for students, staff and faculty that provide guidance on sustainability message must convey core sustainability values, yet use appropriate language for local audiences. And, in addition to messaging tactics, a better job must be done of ensuring that people understand the science of sustainability. 4. Expand the movement While some progress has been made, the movement still needs more of the right people to come to the table, i.e., projects; •  virtual academy that combines the “knowledge A machine”—resources, case studies and project libraries—into a learning resource for everyone that is affordable, accessible to non-traditional students, dynamic and evolving; and •  Programs to promote broad faculty development strategies around education for sustainability. 3.  trengthen the movement’s vision S and message Sustainability is a complex concept. It is important that •  While business has a major impact on higher education practices, an effort is required to organize and engage big business and industry with a commitment to sustainability, to both push and support higher education to produce graduates who are literate about sustainability. •  less than 50 years, people of color will be the In majority, and the movement will be successful only if they are more involved and playing leadership roles. •  Better coalitions need to be built with natural there is broad understanding of what it means and why allies, such as health, labor and the faith-based higher education is crucial for creating a sustainable communities. society. The movement toward sustainability in higher education suffers from the lack of both a widely held vision for a desirable future that promotes systemic, • A more bipartisan perspective must be promoted. •  The youth sustainability movement has achieved integrated thinking, and a common framework or remarkable successes, particularly with energy narrative. The message needs to connect more with policy. Student leadership at their institutions is economic development, jobs and growth, while at responsible for much of the progress noted above. the same time reframing success as something much However, engaging the youth movement in driving larger: a healthy, just and sustainable society, and a fundamental transformation in the sector in an improved quality of life for society as a whole such a way that educating for sustainability as the (imperative for a planet of 9 billion people). The norm has been a missed opportunity to date. Clear leverage points for engaging students need to be identified, as well as specific, core objectives around 14 w w w. c l i m a t e n e u t r a l c a m p u s . c o m which students can organize. “ ustainability is a complex S concept. It is important that there is broad understanding of what it means and why higher education is crucial for creating a sustainable society.” 5. Build the movement’s infrastructure Better mechanisms (such as the 2010 Blueprint meeting that resulted in this report) are needed in order for this remarkable “ecosystem” of organizations and enterprises to evolve into a more efficient network. Sustainable financing sources are
  • required to support the work that happens between our organizations, as well as that of our individual organizations, most of which operate on soft money. We must have a mechanism to stay up to date on what other organizations are doing and be able to map this growing network. 6. Strengthen policy and advocacy work Smart, strategic policies that provide funding and incentives and remove barriers to change are “ remendous win–win T achievements can occur when colleges and universities team up with their host communities to tackle common sustainability challenges, especially those that help improve local quality of life and create jobs.” required to transform the higher education sector term, the work needed to build the advocacy and so that it is able to generate the knowledge and policy capacity of the community should continue graduates necessary to creating a sustainable society. in preparation for when the tide turns yet again. Expanded advocacy efforts are critical for garnering Another potential focus for our efforts is state the broad support that would create such policies and policy, which often has little impact on private programs. It is important to note that new federal schools but can be a significant lever for change legislation and funding are highly unlikely for at least within public colleges and universities. the next two years, and it will be a struggle just to keep in place what little funding now exists. 7. Financing Financing sustainability efforts is one of the most commonly identified barriers to change by individual colleges and universities. Often the lowest-cost “ ew financial models need to N be developed and disseminated to help schools address lack of capital for instituting change, as well as to favor a more sustainable future for these institutions.” systems are used in campus operations, and typically capital and operational budgets are separate, creating a barrier to full life-cycle cost accounting. College and university endowments have a major impact in investment trends, but they often lack transparency and alignment with institutional values and goals. New financial models need to be developed and disseminated to help schools address lack of capital for instituting change, as well as to favor a more Nonetheless, we have been able to identify and sustainable future for these institutions. enlist unprecedented support over the past two to three years for sustainability education within the Next steps Obama administration and from some members of education; surely some small percentage of these The following focus areas and next steps were identified by the Education for Sustainability network as priorities for further work throughout the coming year. They are designed to address many of the major gaps identified above. Volunteers agreed to serve as conveners and invited other members of the network to explore ways to collaborate around the specific focus areas listed below: existing funds can be infused with a sustainability • Community Engagement preference. And, with an eye toward the longer • Curriculum and Research Congress. Short-term progress is still possible by developing new ideas that employ unique federal assets (e.g., convening power, influence, etc.) and do not require new money. In addition, $100+ billion per year flows from the federal government to higher 15
  • chapter 1 White Paper • Facilities and Operations • Messaging and Outreach • Diversity • Network Building • Policy and Advocacy • Investments, Endowments and Financial Models • Executive Leadership Conclusion Thousands of faculty and administrators at hundreds of colleges and universities have committed to leading their institutions toward adopting the principles of sustainability. However, while individuals at colleges and universities may often be ready to embrace change, higher education as a system is itself very conservative and contains immense buffers to change. Campus champions (administrators, faculty, operational personnel and students) simply cannot do the job alone. They need an effective, strategic and influential national movement that can provide resources and facilitate opportunities to work together and learn from one another. This is precisely the goal of those who participated in the creation of the EfS Blueprint. The participants focused on strengthening the essential elements of a national movement—the intellectual and financial capital, the moral framework, the visibility of the movement in the public space, and the necessary tools—that in turn can help champions on campuses surmount difficult internal and external barriers. The process of developing this Blueprint resulted in concrete, pragmatic steps for fostering collaboration and increasing the impact of our individual efforts. 16 With increased cooperation and support, we are confident that a tipping point can and will be achieved w w w. c l i m a t e n e u t r a l c a m p u s . c o m despite the daunting challenges that lie ahead. For the complete EfS Blueprint document, please visit www.secondnature.org/efsblueprint.  “ mart, strategic policies that S provide funding and incentives and remove barriers to change are required to transform the higher education sector so that it is able to generate the knowledge and graduates necessary to creating a sustainable society.”
  • About the Author Georges Dyer joined Second Nature at the beginning of 2007 as vice president of programs. His work has focused on building and supporting networks such as the ACUPCC and the Advancing Green Building in Higher Education Initiative. Dyer has played a leading role in developing many of the core supporting documents for the initiative and topical resources, including the ACUPCC Voluntary Carbon Offset Protocol and Leading Profound Change—a resource for college and university presidents engaged in leading the transformational change processes required to move toward sustainability on campus and beyond. He has spoken and presented widely about the ACUPCC and the rest of Second Nature’s work at national and regional conferences and individual campuses. He is on the advisory board of Greenopolis.com and is a trustee of StratLeade Sustainability Education. Dyer is a graduate of The Mountain School of Milton Academy, Phillips Exeter Academy, Dartmouth College, and the Blekinge Institute of Technology in Karlskrona, Sweden, where he earned a master’s degree in strategic leadership toward sustainability. 17
  • chapter 1 CAMPUS Leadership | Case Study Organizing for a Successful Green Initiative: Wilberforce University Ohio’s Wilberforce University shares its commitment to a climate-neutral campus, and the work of campus stakeholders in attaining the university’s “green vision” Case Study by Nodie M. Washington, Ph.D., Special Assistant to the President Introduction Consistent with its mission of educating students for the global community, Wilberforce University has implemented systematic plans and strategies to facilitate a campus-wide reduction in its carbon footprint. Termed the Green Initiative, this effort will institutionalize the university’s commitment to climate neutrality by educating all constituent groups on reducing their contribution to negative greenhouse gas emissions. The spirit of the Green Initiative should extend beyond the campus and into the everyday lives of our constituents. University goals, objectives and strategies to the benefit of its community of scholars and the surrounding areas. A Green Steering Team (GST) was formed to guide the implementation of the Green Initiative goals, objectives and strategies. The GST consists of the university’s president and vice presidents, project coordinators and chairs of the functional green committees. Five functional green committees were identified to encompass key strategic areas requiring significant planning and focus: Data Collection & Analysis, Technology, Academic Program, Recycle/Reduce/Reuse, and Communication. Composed of students, faculty and staff, each committee defined its scope and deliverables around the university’s overall goals, objectives and strategies. Achieving a green campus... the work 18 w w w. c l i m a t e n e u t r a l c a m p u s . c o m > Green Initiative: Wilberforce University Green organization The goal of the Wilberforce Green Vision is to help the university become recognized as a green campus, consistently reducing its carbon footprint The five functional committees have defined initial plans for moving the Wilberforce University toward becoming a green campus. The Data & Collection Analysis committee has begun collecting energyusage data across all buildings and areas on the campus to document the university’s current carbon footprint. Plans are in place to implement usage of energy-efficient items/equipment, including light bulbs, HVAC systems, water heating systems, plumbing and roofing. Items toward instituting green consciousness in everyday activities of the university community are also being addressed. The Technology committee is focused on identifying effective and state-of-art systems that propel the institution closer to energy efficiency, including a more paperless campus. The Recycle/Reduce/Reuse
  • committee aims to positively change behaviors of university constituents relative to all items being used and/or consumed. Partnering with Waste Management, Inc., recycling efforts are being organized. Our Academic Program committee is chartered with educating our community of scholars in environmental science phenomena via interdisciplinary courses/seminars and other venues to generate a continuous focus on sustainability issues. To effectively communicate the vision, activities and all green efforts, the Communication committee is exploring novel information pathways, including Facebook, Twitter, text messages as well as screen savers on all university computers. Contests with awards are planned to encourage critical thinking around unique and innovative ways of moving the university toward its vision of becoming a green campus. Taking great pride as the first private coeducational historically black college and university in the United States, Wilberforce University is pledged to move its campus well into the 21st century by “going green.” 19 About the Author Dr. Nodie M. Washington has an M.Sc. in chemistry from Rutgers University and a Ph.D. in physical chemistry from Ohio State University. She spent 25 years at the Procter and Gamble Company, leading research teams of scientists and engineers in the development of fabric-care products such as Tide and Downy. Dr. Washington currently serves as the special assistant to the president at Wilberforce University, with a focus area of Special Projects, and as co-coordinator of the university’s Green Initiative. Located in Ohio and established in 1856, Wilberforce University is America’s first private, coeducational university established to educate men and women of African descent.
  • CAMPUSES DEMAND MILLIONS OF GALLONS OF WATER EVERY YEAR, and “drinking” water is used to meet all of these needs, even in places – like toilets – where it will never be consumed. Wastewater is then dumped into a municipal sewer system and pumped miles away for treatment. This costly, wasteful and energy-intensive process simply doesn’t make sense.
  • Introducing BlueHouse: TM a better way to treat and reuse water BlueHouse is a water treatment and reclamation system that utilizes a highly complex ecosystem comprised of plants, bacteria, and other organisms to naturally treat, purify and recycle up to 90,000 gallons of sanitary and storm water per day. Great for the environment. Greater still for your campus. What makes BlueHouse truly remarkable is what it does with water once it’s treated. Instead of pumping it away, it extends the life of water by reusing it on-site for things like cooling towers, boilers irrigation, and even toilet flushing – creating a more sustainable campus. Pays for itself in as little as four years. BlueHouse looks like a greenhouse and makes an attractive addition to any campus. A BlueHouse conserves public water supplies by reducing freshwater withdrawal from increasingly depleted sources. Since less potable water is used, water costs are lowered – allowing this facility to pay for itself over time. GRANTS AVAILABLE. Call (804) 545-5485 to learn about grants for bringing a BlueHouse system to your campus. Botanical garden? Treatment Facility? Living Laboratory? Or the solution to a sustainable campus water system? ALL OF THE ABOVE. The BlueHouse water treatment and reclamation system applies innovative bio- nano- and information technologies in an engineered ecological habitat to purify waste water. Treated water is then freed for reuse in any non-potable application on campus. The facility looks like a botanical garden within a greenhouse and provides an exceptional “living laboratory” for environmental sciences, biology, urban planning, and more. organicawater.com/campus
  • chapter 1 CAMPUS Leadership | White Paper Green For All Ambassadors: Working to Build a Green Future The Green For All Ambassador Program helps historically black colleges and universities continue to embolden and empower the next generation of America’s leaders as they work to make an equitable and green economy a reality By Phaedra Ellis-Lamkins, CEO, Green For All Throughout history, America’s youth have stepped In 2010, we launched the Green For All College up to face the nation’s greatest challenges. Just Ambassador Program in partnership with 10 look at the struggle for civil rights, the battle for historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs). women’s equality and the fight for fair wages: This alliance was a natural fit. For more than a century, young people played an integral part in all of these HBCUs have represented hope and excellence, movements. Their energy, optimism and willingness producing many of America’s finest leaders. to propose new solutions to old problems have helped society make incredible strides in the long march toward justice. 22 w w w. c l i m a t e n e u t r a l c a m p u s . c o m That’s why Green For All has actively worked to get young people involved in the development of the green economy. As we combat two of today’s greatest challenges—pollution and poverty, both of which disproportionately affect people of color and low-income communities—we recognize the incredible role that young leaders will play in our effort, both today and tomorrow.  “ n 2010, we launched the Green I For All College Ambassador Program in partnership with 10 historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs). This alliance was a natural fit. For more than a century, HBCUs have represented hope and excellence, producing many of America’s finest leaders.”
  • Today, these institutions are educating the leaders of the future, and Green For All is proud to be working with them through the Ambassador Program, which provides mentoring and expert training that empower students with the tools to serve as green champions on their campuses. Green For All helps them lead education workshops and semester-long campus sustainability campaigns to raise awareness and get others involved. In the fall 2010 semester alone, the Ambassadors “ ecoming a Green For All College B Ambassador at my university has given me indispensable tools and training to become an even more committed and knowledgeable environmental leader, both at FAMU and in my local community.” coordinated more than 20 workshops on various topics ranging from environmental justice to sustainable economic development. UNCF has led the way in providing sustainability resources and accountability to campuses; that’s why we are proud to partner with UNCF to help make the promise of a green economy a reality. The students involved in the Ambassador Program are doing a great job of raising awareness, opening minds and inspiring others to join the movement. “ or the past month, my campus F partner, Nikita Piercy, and I have been getting involved with existing green initiatives on our campus while planning our own fall workshop series, along with a spring greening campaign and recycling competition.” A few of them were kind enough to share their stories, in their own words: Cassidy Cannon, Elizabeth City State University I am a junior marketing major at Elizabeth City State University in North Carolina, where I also serve as the vice president of external affairs of the Student Government Association. This year, I became a Green For All College Ambassador, which I am very excited about because this opportunity introduced me to a whole new world on my campus. For the past month, my campus partner, Nikita Piercy, and I have been getting involved with existing green initiatives on our campus while planning our own fall workshop series, along with a spring greening campaign and recycling competition. Being a student leader isn’t easy. Whom do I talk to on campus? What projects have been completed? Do we have funding for that? To add even more pressure, this movement has the ability to change the world—literally, change the world. And I am now a catalyst for that change. Stop. Breathe. Now breathe again. Every movement has a starting point. The first step is to prepare your mind. Learn everything there is to know. Luckily, there is information everywhere about the green economy and a sustainable world. First, see how that information applies to your area or university. Second, talk to everybody. Make them aware of your purpose, describe your goal, and share your motivation. You’d be surprised at how many people “know a guy.” Third, solidify those resources, and ask them to plan with you. Learn to listen to them. More times than not, they know what they’re talking about. Let your failures motivate you to do better, and let your achievements motivate you to do more. And after your first workshop is complete: Stop. Breathe. Now breathe again. Every movement has a starting point… 23
  • chapter 1 CAMPUS Leadership | White Paper Jomar Floyd, Florida A&M University As a senior at Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University (FAMU), I am a proud and leading member of the campus’s Green Coalition. Becoming a Green For All College Ambassador at my university has given me indispensable tools and training to become an even more committed and knowledgeable environmental leader, both at FAMU and in my local community. My co-ambassador at FAMU, Ursula Ible, and I recently organized two educational workshops designed “ here will be some challenges T ahead for me and for my fellow Ambassador, Whitney Jones —we have faced some of them already, but it is comforting to know that we have the support of Green For All, Students in Free Enterprise, and the Department of Entrepreneurship and Professional Development.” to empower students to step up to new levels of This year, as part of my ambassadorship at FAMU, environmental leadership. I am eager to learn more about how to “revive” The first workshop, “Your Life, Your Environment,” focused on critical environmental issues such as water shortages, pollution and lack of access to the traditions of sustainability once held by our institutions, by creating partnerships with our farmers, landowners and local communities. reality for many communities across the country. We Alicia Crudup, Jackson State University also discussed the ongoing fight between the Nestlé My name is Alicia Crudup, and I am a senior Corporation and the Wacissa, Florida community entrepreneurship major at Jackson State University over the Wacissa River and springs, where Nestlé is located in the heart of Mississippi (City of Jackson). allegedly depleting the water sources without regard And yes, we still have a heartbeat! It is a little faint, to the local community. but we are going to pump some fresh, oxygenated affordable, healthy food—issues that are a grim daily blood into it. The Green Jobs Movement we are Students later enjoyed Markese “Doo-Dat” Bryant’s Mother Earth, but also to our families, friends and Overall, the turnout was great. Students were actively communities. I am very proud to be a part of this engaged in conversations about the information effort. This will be a legacy I will leave behind not only presented to them. for my own children, but for others’ children as well. During the second workshop, “Carbon Climate Mother Earth was here before us, and she will be here Change & the Benefits of Going Green,” Ursula and I after us. So, while we are spending time here, it is shared why we got involved in the green movement. up to us to give back to her as she continually gives I explained Green For All’s mission and why “green to us. There will be some challenges ahead for me jobs” are needed, particularly in low-income and 24 creating is our way of giving back not only to music video The Dream Reborn (My President is Green). and for my fellow Ambassador, Whitney Jones—we w w w. c l i m a t e n e u t r a l c a m p u s . c o m communities of color. have faced some of them already, but it is comforting to know that we have the support of Green For All, Last, we discussed how HBCU students must become Students in Free Enterprise, and the Department of a stronger force in the green movement to help Entrepreneurship and Professional Development. ensure that our communities are at the forefront of reaping the environmental, economic and health benefits afforded by a clean energy economy. Our first workshop here at Jackson State was a success. Our Bridging the Gap prompt will be used again at the beginning of next semester. The
  • students were so attentive, and they enjoyed the step some important contacts that will help our school forward/step back workshop just as we, the College make a transition to a greener future. After all that Ambassadors, had at our training. The students has happened this past semester, I cannot wait who participated in our event were so excited that until next semester when we actually take action a committee of nine students was formed to help toward making Jackson State University a more us carry out our duties as Ambassadors. I see these environmentally friendly campus! people as the future leaders of the movement when I move on from the university. I am excited about our next workshop, which will be very interactive with much discussion. It will be interesting to hear other points of view and use them in a positive way. We are also making About the Author Phaedra Ellis-Lamkins is the chief executive officer of Green For All. Ellis-Lamkins has led Green For All to several groundbreaking policy victories at the federal, state and local levels. Under her leadership, Green For All has become one of the country’s leading advocates for a clean-energy economy, and one of its most important voices on the intersection of economics and environment. Prior to joining Green For All, Ellis-Lamkins was a leader in California’s labor movement, heading both the South Bay AFL–CIO Labor Council and Working Partnerships USA. To learn more, please visit: http://www.greenforall.org. 25
  • chapter 1 CAMPUS Leadership | White Paper Greening Howard University Howard University’s renewable energy and recycling programs show that campus leadership is actively incorporating sustainability into campus culture By Illai Kenney, Howard University 26 w w w. c l i m a t e n e u t r a l c a m p u s . c o m The leadership at Howard University clearly understands its responsibility to the environment. It is committed to placing the university among the leading institutions responding to many global environmental issues by “Going Green” while still providing a high-quality living, learning and working experience for students, staff and faculty. In this regard, the 2010–2011 academic year was a productive time for Howard University. The university has made great strides in going green. For one, to coordinate all its green efforts, Howard University officially established an office of sustainability, headed by Alfonzye Chisholm. An example of Howard University’s commitment to going green is demonstrated in its ongoing partnership with Honeywell International through a long-term, multi-phased energy performance contract that began in 2007. The goal of the project is to promote the efficient use of energy by better controlling that use. This reduces energy consumption and results in cost savings over a period of time. This return on investment pays for the implementation cost of the energy project. According to Chris Bowens, a project manager at Honeywell, “The university spends hundreds of thousands of dollars a month on its gas bill.” Currently, Howard burns oil and gas as energy sources, and has been working with the company to improve energy usage and become more sustainable.  “ n example of Howard A University’s commitment to going green is demonstrated in its ongoing partnership with Honeywell International through a long-term, multi-phased energy performance contract that began in 2007.”
  • The first step was to identify opportunities for saving energy across the campus. These opportunities were used to establish the energy baseline and later became the focus of projects that would reduce that usage. As a result, Honeywell has started a number of projects around the campus, among them HVAC and lighting-control retrofits. Of significant importance is the recent installation of solar panels on the roof of Burr Gymnasium. These panels are used to heat the water in the building, and they represent Howard’s first renewable energy source. “The university currently uses gas to heat city water to create steam,” said Bowens. The steam travels through a pipe on campus and goes through a heat exchange to heat the building. By using the sun as a renewable energy source to heat the building’s water, the university reduces the volume of gas consumed, thus lowering the expense. The 21 domestic hot water solar panels on the roof of the building also send a clear message that renewable energy is here and that Howard University is committed to going green. In furthering Howard University’s green efforts, the Office of Sustainability worked closely with the university’s recycling hauler and Office of Residence Life to help advance the recycling program. To this end, 13,000 personal recycling bins were dispensed to students living in the dormitories to help facilitate recycling. Each resident was given two bins: one for bottles and cans, and one for paper. This, along with more than 300 posters and other educational materials, helped to increase the university’s overall diversion rate. For the second year during RecycleMania (a 10-week competition among universities nationwide), Howard measured its diversion rate and collected data about waste management. The average diversion rate for 2010 was 14 percent. The average diversion rate for 2011 was 22 percent. Overall, 111,640 pounds of materials were recovered and diverted from landfills during RecycleMania. Campus-wide, Howard diverted 8.65 pounds of material per person. “ verall, 111,640 pounds of O materials were recovered and diverted from landfills during RecycleMania. Campus-wide, Howard diverted 8.65 pounds of material per person.” Much effort has been made to advance the university’s recycling program, but there have been many other accomplishments as well. Howard University celebrated Earth Day in a grand fashion! More than 100 student, faculty and staff volunteers planted thousands of plants across campus. The office of sustainability hosted an informational program and students began the HALO Green organic garden. The garden was planted by—and is entirely maintained by—students. All Howard University dormitories now have bicycle racks, and all renovated buildings going forward will include bicycle racks. In expanding its green efforts, the Office of Residence Life has declared recycling mandatory for all students living on campus; all nine dormitories will compete in an energyreduction competition similar to RecycleMania. The university is also in the beginning stages of creating nine electric vehicle-charging stations across the campus. These successes have helped increase the momentum of green efforts on the campus. Howard University accomplished a great deal in the 2010-2011 academic year, but there are still many more steps to take. There are 400 new recycle bins to be deployed on campus. There will be collections on each floor of every dormitory to help increase the participation of students living on campus. Taking advantage of every opportunity available, Howard University is going green! 27 About the Author Illai Kenney is a senior telecommunications management major at Howard University with a focus on making her campus sustainable, including in the areas of socially responsible investing, recycling, and community development, and others. She is a student intern at Howard University’s Office of Sustainability and a Green For All Ambassador on her campus.
  • chapter 1 CAMPUS Leadership | White Paper Visions of Sustainability in 2050 The promise of a sustainable future can be fulfilled if higher education institutions integrate principles of sustainability into the fundamental purpose of all learning By Anthony D. Cortese, Sc.D., Second Nature 28 w w w. c l i m a t e n e u t r a l c a m p u s . c o m The following is a vision for a healthy, peaceful, socially just, economically secure, culturally vibrant and environmentally sustainable world. This vision is synthesized from the thinking of a large and diverse number of world leaders in many fields of endeavor, and from reports and programs of the world’s most progressive governmental, business, academic and civic organizations. Many of the ideas are embodied in the UN’s eight Millennium Development Goals that range from halving extreme poverty to halting the spread of HIV/AIDS and providing universal primary education, all by the target date of 2015. It is a vision that is vital to achieving sustainability by 2050—and possible with bold, collaborative leadership from all sectors of society. In order for society to achieve this vision, higher education must develop a new framework in which individual institutions and the sector as a whole operate as fully integrated communities that teach, research, and model social and ecological sustainability. In order for this vision to become a reality, creating a thriving, enduring society must become the fundamental purpose of all learning; sustainability must become a foundational principle of higher education rather than a specialized discipline; and all graduates must understand how to live their personal and professional lives in alignment with the  “ n order for society to achieve this I vision, higher education must develop a new framework in which individual institutions and the sector as a whole operate as fully integrated communities that teach, research, and model social and ecological sustainability.”
  • principles of sustainability. In short, a sustainability perspective must become second nature to us all. Without a diverse coalition, higher education will not be able to bring about the transformation needed to ensure a safe and sustainable future. As institutions charged with educating students of diverse socio-economic backgrounds to become responsible citizens, minority-serving institutions play a pivotal role in advancing society toward holistic sustainability. Only with their dynamic leadership, long-term commitment and active participation can higher education lead the way to a sustainable future. and sustainable agriculture. Biological diversity is once again increasing. • New business models are based on the following: –  Increased production of durable, repairable goods, and elimination of persistent toxic and bio-accumulative substances. –  business focus on providing the ultimate A ends of products or services, not the products or services themselves. Products are viewed as a means to deliver a service to a customer. Companies own the molecules and consumers lease the services, creating incentives for industry to use as little energy and material as possible, minimize waste, and design for disassembly and reuse. –  Stronger partnerships with and greater engagement of communities to support and cultivate local economies. This vision of sustainability in 2050 is epitomized by the following… There is widespread understanding and acceptance that health, economic and social progress are all dependent on a healthy biosphere: The world’s population is stabilized at a level that is within the short- and long-term carrying capacity of the earth’s finite resources. The market is the servant in aligning social, economic and natural systems for mutual benefit and sustainability: •  The throughput of fossil fuels and materials in the economy is dramatically reduced. Non-polluting, renewable energy provides the vast majority of the world’s energy. •  Energy and resource productivity is ten times greater than that of the year 2000. •  mirror, learn from and live within natural We systems: nature as mentor, model and measure. •  The industrial economy operates on renewable energy in a cyclical manner. This eliminates the concept of waste, since all industrial outputs will be a raw material or technical nutrient for other industrial operations or will go back into the cycles of nature. •  use renewable resources at a rate less than We or equal to the natural environment’s ability to regenerate the resource, and preserve the diversity and integrity of the earth’s ecosystem services. This means living off nature’s income, not its capital, by practicing sustainable forestry, sustainable fishing “ trong, healthy, culturally diverse S and environmentally sustainable local communities are the goal of economic and social policy.” Transportation, land use and sustainable communities: •  Low energy-consuming/-polluting systems now represent half of all transportation means. •  Mass transportation and other mobility options are available to half the world’s population, and 90 percent of automobiles, trucks and buses are powered by non-polluting sources, e.g., electricity produced by renewable energy or sustainably produced biofuels. 29 •  Sprawl is declining because innercities have been revitalized to make business and jobs accessible to innercity residents through enhanced public transportation, bicycling or walking infrastructure. •  Planning, design and development of transportation infrastructure always address the unique challenges confronted by the impoverished, as well as by citizens with special needs.
  • chapter 1 CAMPUS Leadership | White Paper •  Strong, healthy, culturally diverse and environmentally sustainable local communities are the goal of economic and social policy. Equity, democracy, peace and security: •  Government and institutional policies foster intra-generational and intergenerational equity and peace. •  The world literacy rate is 90 percent. Women have the same opportunities for education as men. •  The majority of people worldwide have access to jobs that provide for basic human needs and family stability. Women and men enjoy equal access to jobs. •  The gap between the richest 20percent of the population and the poorest has dropped from 70:1 to 7:1. •  Resource consumption has been reduced by 75 percent in the industrialized world, and has increased sufficiently in developing countries to meet the needs of citizens. All consumption is done in a manner that minimizes the ecological footprint and improves the quality of life. •  Non-material means are utilized to meet non-material needs, e.g., strong family/social relations, meaningful work, and achievement of higher aspirations. •  Civic engagement and participatory, open democracy with full human rights are practiced by 75 percent of the world’s population. •  Cultural diversity is respected and is once again increasing. •  The lessons of environmental stewardship embedded in traditional wisdom and indigenous cultures have become ubiquitous knowledge and inspiration for industry, academe and government. 30 New measures of human and societal well-being: w w w. c l i m a t e n e u t r a l c a m p u s . c o m •  New macroeconomic indicators to supplement Gross Domestic Product: –  Adds environmental and social-cost side to growth ledger –  Accounts for positive impact from non-monetary activity (e.g., parenting and volunteering) “ ach year, 3 million students E graduate from U.S. institutions of higher education —and millions more from international institutions —going on to make choices that guide and shape our society and economy.” •  Indicators of well-being include health, economic vitality and equity, community stability, level of education, availability of affordable housing, equal access to transportation, and the condition of the natural and built environment. •  Prices reflect all the social, health and environmental costs to society, as well as the direct costs and profits to the producers. •  Taxes have been shifted from taxing “desirables”— income, investment, employment—to taxing “undesirables”—resource consumption and depletion, fossil fuel use, pollution, waste, and loss of biodiversity. •  Signals of ecological distress are received in time to prevent or remedy damage to humans or the environment. Improved human health: •  percent of the world has access to clean water, 90 sanitation and adequate nutritious food. •  Waterborne infectious disease and AIDS have been eliminated as major causes of illness and death. •  percent of the word’s population lives in areas 90 where the air quality is healthful. •  percent of the world’s population has decent, 90 affordable housing. Globalization has been humanized, with the following results: • Technology leapfrogging for developing countries. • Support for democracy and human rights. • A rise in human aspirations. – Accounts for future as well as present well-being • Creation of more jobs for everyone. – Adjusts for income disparities. • Narrowing of the gap between rich and poor.
  • International governance has been reformed: • World Trade Organization: –  Shows greater respect for health and environmental issues – Protects consumer right to know laws –  Allows trade measures to protect global commons –  Defers environmental decisions to environmental treaties. •  Consideration of solving environmental and health problems is integral to World Bank and International Monetary Fund lending. •  The United Nations has been reconstituted to be more democratic, and to be the chief peacekeeper and advocate for a just and sustainable world. The global climate has been restabilized: •  The global climate has been restabilized and the concentration of atmospheric carbon dioxide has returned to safe levels below 350 parts per million. This has happened through a 90 percent reduction in fossil fuels and a 50 percent increase in forested land worldwide. Each year, 3 million students graduate from U.S. institutions of higher education—and millions more from international institutions—going on to make choices that guide and shape our society and economy. Their formal education is one crucial part of the solution to climate change and creation of the kind of healthy, just and sustainable society we envision today. In an effort to help society realize this vision, Second Nature, a leading non-profit organization with the mission to create a sustainable society by transforming higher education, was founded in 1993. Since its inception, Second Nature has been a driving force in creating and accelerating the Education for Sustainability movement, working collaboratively with colleges and universities and allies in other sectors to build strong networks within the sector and across sectors. Second Nature is the lead supporting organization of the American College & University Presidents’ Climate Commitment (ACUPCC)—a national network of 675 colleges and universities implementing a successful, comprehensive strategy to accelerate progress toward climate neutrality and sustainability. To view references and sources please visit www.climateneutralcampus.com About the Author Anthony D. Cortese, one of the nation’s path-breaking leaders in greening higher education, is president and co-founder (with Senator John Kerry and Teresa Heinz) of Second Nature, a non-profit working to make healthy, just and sustainable action a first principle of higher education. He is the lead organizer of the ACUPCC, co-founder of the Association for the Advancement of Sustainability in Higher Education, and a consultant on institutionalizing sustainability principles and programs. He is former commissioner of the Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection and Tufts University dean of Environmental Programs (www.secondnature.org). 31
  • chapter 1 CAMPUS Leadership | White Paper Sustainable Spelman A selection from a convocation speech given on August 26, 2010 By Dr. Beverly Daniel Tatum, President of Spelman College The core of what I want to focus on today is in the title, liberal arts and sciences and the intellectual, creative, “Sustainable Spelman.” ethical and leadership development of its students. Spelman empowers the whole person to engage the The theme was inspired initially by three events: my many cultures of the world and inspires a commitment to attendance at the UNCF Building Green Institute in positive social change. San Antonio in June, where Spelman was highlighted as a leader among historically black colleges and How can we be a global leader in the education of universities for our environmental responsibility; women of African descent without paying attention to my experience watching helplessly for weeks this 32 summer as gallon after gallon of crude oil bubbled w w w. c l i m a t e n e u t r a l c a m p u s . c o m up from a deep sea well into the Gulf of Mexico, polluting coastal fishing waters and marshlands; and, most recently, reading Thomas Friedman’s book, Hot, Flat, and Crowded, as I know some of our first-year students have. Our mission at Spelman is very clear: Spelman College, a historically black college and a global leader in the education of women of African descent, is dedicated to academic excellence in the “ ow can we foster ethical H leadership without educating our students about environmental responsibility? How can we honestly engage the many cultures of the world without acknowledging the American overuse of the world’s resources?”
  • the global impact of our environmental choices? How can we foster ethical leadership without educating our students about environmental responsibility? How can we honestly engage the many cultures of the world without acknowledging the American overuse of the world’s resources? How can we inspire a commitment to positive social change without setting a clear institutional example ourselves? In the 19th century, our founders, Sophia Packard and Harriet Giles, said when they began creating this campus that they were “building for 100 years.” This “ e’ve been recognized by the W media, other higher education institutions, and even the Environmental Protection Agency, for our efforts—including our LEED-certified residence hall known as The Suites, the first building of its kind on an HBCU campus.” year we will celebrate the 130th anniversary of the founding of Spelman College, and we can see known as The Suites, the first building of its kind all around us evidence of their 100-year foresight. on an HBCU campus. We have been praised for our Now in the 21st century, we too have to take the “green” cleaning program using non-toxic cleaning long view, and think about the generations that supplies, our paperless business processes, and our are coming after us. beautiful, low-maintenance vegetation that is watered with recycled water from our cooling systems. As I mentioned, some of us at Spelman have been We’ve received grant funding from the Community reading Hot, Flat, and Crowded by Thomas Friedman. Foundation of Atlanta to conduct an energy audit of Friedman makes clear that we need to develop the Science Building, and from Home Depot to retrofit a sense of urgency about the environmental the heating and cooling systems so we can conserve degradation that is taking place around us. And if we energy in that building—the most energy-guzzling don’t step up—and teach our students to do so—we building on campus. We have reinstituted recycling, will all regret it. an effort started by faculty in the 1990s but in need of jump-starting again for this 21st century. To quote Thomas Friedman, These are all important efforts but they just scratch If we want to maintain…a habitable planet, rich the surface of what we could do and must do to with flora and fauna, leopards and lions, and human reduce our collective carbon footprint in order communities that can grow in a sustainable way—things to slow the tide of environmental degradation will have to change around here, and fast. occurring as a result of our overconsumption of the world’s resources. We are the first generation of Americans in the EnergyClimate Era. This is not about the whales anymore. It’s Because we can do more and must do more, I am about us. And what we do about the challenges of pleased to announce that yesterday I signed the energy and climate, conservation and preservation, American College & University Presidents’ Climate will tell our kids who we really are… Commitment, joining more than 670 other college and university presidents who have signed. Now, Spelman has already made accomplishments in this area for which we have been recognized. An excerpt of the Climate Commitment follows: Environmental science and environmental studies are rapidly growing interests among the students “…colleges and universities must exercise leadership and faculty at Spelman. We’ve been recognized by in their communities and throughout society by the media, other higher education institutions, and modeling ways to minimize global warming emissions, even the Environmental Protection Agency, for our and by providing the knowledge and the educated efforts—including our LEED-certified residence hall graduates to achieve climate neutrality. Campuses 33
  • chapter 1 CAMPUS Leadership | White Paper that address the climate challenge by reducing global warming emissions and by integrating sustainability into their curriculum will better serve their students and meet their social mandate to help create a thriving, ethical and civil society. These colleges and universities will be providing students with the knowledge and skills needed to address the critical, systemic challenges faced by the world in this new century and enable them to benefit from the economic opportunities that will arise as a result of solutions they develop.” The Presidents’ Climate Commitment requires us to create a long-term plan—perhaps as long as 20 or 30 years—for achieving climate neutrality, and to report publicly on our progress on a regular basis. We know our efforts will be by necessity incremental, and our plan may be revised many times in the process, but we cannot in good conscience ignore the science that tells us we have to change our ways, and do it as quickly as we can. We often hear the phrase “think globally, act locally,” and indeed that is what attention to environmental sustainability requires us to do. The choices we make here at Spelman and in our daily lives have ripple effects not just at home but around the world. We must have an ethic of conservation on our campus. Our mission statement talks about ethical development, but what are ethics? Friedman writes, “Ethics are not laws. They are not imposed by the state. Rather they are norms, values, beliefs, habits and attitudes that are embraced voluntarily—that we as a society impose on ourselves. Laws regulate behavior from the outside in. Ethics regulate behavior from the inside out. Ethics are something 34 you carry with you wherever you go to guide whatever you do.” w w w. c l i m a t e n e u t r a l c a m p u s . c o m “ he choices we make here at T Spelman and in our daily lives have ripple effects not just at home but around the world. We must have an ethic of conservation on our campus.” “ n ethic of conservation requires A us to be good stewards of our resources now so that there will be resources available in the future —not only for us but also for those who will come after us.” Or to say it differently, ethics are what you do even when no one else is watching. In Hot, Flat, and Crowded, Friedman quotes Michael Sandel, a political philosopher at Harvard, who describes an ethic of conservation as “an ethic of restraint,” understanding that we cannot just use our natural resources as though they were limitless. An ethic of conservation requires us to be good stewards of our resources now so that there will be resources available in the future—not only for us but also for those who will come after us. The vision of a Sustainable Spelman requires all of us to adopt an ethic of conservation. A couple of years ago we faced a severe drought in Atlanta. The reservoir was down so low that it was said there was a water supply of less than 90 days. At that time, we launched a water conservation campaign on campus, and the governor stood on the steps of the Capitol Building and publicly prayed for rain. It did eventually rain, and the reservoir filled back up, and some of us went back to our old habits. But the fact is that we still live in a place that has a limited water supply and a rapidly growing population. We have to have an ethic of conservation for our own sake, and for the sake of others.
  • About the Author Dr. Beverly Daniel Tatum has served as president of Spelman College since 2002. Her tenure as president has been marked by a period of great innovation and growth. Spelman College, long recognized as the leading educator of women of African descent, is now ranked among the top 100 liberal arts colleges in the nation. An accomplished administrator, Dr. Tatum is also widely recognized as a race relations expert and leader in higher education. In 2005, Dr. Tatum was awarded the prestigious Brock International Prize in Education for her innovative leadership in the field. Her bestselling titles include Can We Talk About Race? And Other Conversations in an Era of School Resegregation (2007) and Why Are All the Black Kids Sitting Together in the Cafeteria? And Other Conversations About Race (1997). She is also the author of Assimilation Blues: Black Families in White Communities: Who Succeeds and Why? (1987). She holds a B.A. degree in psychology from Wesleyan University, and an M.A. and Ph.D. in clinical psychology from the University of Michigan. She also holds an M.A. in religious studies from Hartford Seminary. She has served as a faculty member at the University of California at Santa Barbara, Westfield State College and Mount Holyoke College, where she also served as dean and acting president. 35
  • chapter 1 CAMPUS Leadership | White Paper The People Side of Performance Contracting Leverage the interaction between people and their environment to promote participation in the energy-efficiency process By Dr. Scott Finlinson, NORESCO Educating students to be global, ethical leaders Energy savings performance contracting is a turnkey must involve knowledge about the global impact of service that provides a comprehensive set of energy- our energy decisions. From a cultural perspective, efficiency and conservation measures, with guarantees acknowledging that we Americans are relatively that the savings produced by the service will fund heavy consumers of the Earth’s limited resources— the project. Hence, the energy savings performance and then doing something about it—helps students contract (ESPC) is a “walking-the-talk” example of an develop a global perspective on environmental institution doing its part to ensure the sustainability stewardship, aiding them in their interactions with people of other cultures on this issue. In addition, 36 when teachers and staff work on an environmentally w w w. c l i m a t e n e u t r a l c a m p u s . c o m responsible campus, environmental education will be better received. Therefore, encouraging individual and institutional energy efficiency and conservation has substantial overlap with many college and university mission statements. Encouragement and education are enhanced when the institution or organization sets a clear example. One way to achieve such an example in these tough economic times is through a performance contracting framework.  “ ORESCO’s holistic approach N toward performance contracting leverages the complex interaction between people and their environment in an effort to promote participation in the energy-efficiency process.”
  • of the campus for future generations while reducing its environmental footprint. While some may stop at building retrofits utilizing efficient technologies and procedures, we believe that all organizational members should participate in this innovative energy initiative to maximize and sustain the many economic, environmental, social and educational benefits of the ESPC project. Therefore, we suggest that any institution considering an ESPC seek out a service provider that is proficient at both engineering “ y changing the institutional B way of life to a more ‘conserving’ culture, an enhanced use of old, inefficient technologies can be combined with the use of new technologies to play a role in the total energy savings achieved.” efficiencies and behavior-change solutions. The Awareness-Communication component begins NORESCO’s holistic approach toward performance by informing all organizational members about contracting leverages the complex interaction the purpose and benefits of the ESPC project, between people and their environment in an effort communicating the changes that can be expected to promote participation in the energy-efficiency to result from the project, and providing a means process. To achieve optimal benefit from newly by which questions, concerns and/or suggestions installed high-efficiency equipment and systems—in can be addressed directly to the project manager. addition to generating additional energy savings over Next, information about the benefits of the project and above those achieved by efficient technologies— is disseminated on a larger scale. This information NORESCO creates a comprehensive, custom program is designed to enhance both internal and external known as the Energy Conservation Through Behavior perceptions of the institution, a process that can lead Change® (ECTBC) program. Educational institutions to multiple positive outcomes. have followed its principles and proprietary design to accomplish change on campus. Communicating this enhanced environmental stewardship of the Earth’s resources, along with an The program is composed of four overlapping increased competitive advantage (due to enhanced, components: (1) a Human Behavior Energy Audit® smart buildings), can bolster confidence by staff assessment; (2) Awareness-Communication; and faculty that they are employed by a sustainable (3) Sustainable Behavior Change; and (4) Green institution. Existing students report higher Schoolhouse Curriculum Enhancement. Using satisfaction with their chosen institution, while high the inherent opportunity to “go green” within school students now consider the “greenness” of an performance contracting, the ECTBC program instills institution when deciding what college or university and sustains a culture of energy efficiency, with to attend. In essence, since reducing pollution, resulting impacts on campus, and throughout the decreasing natural-resource consumption, and local community and beyond. increasing operational efficiency are so well-received, Utilizing archival data, individual meetings, focus groups and a behavioral survey, our Human Behavior we communicate this project’s activities to the widest possible audience. Energy Audit (HBEA) assessment is designed to The central aspect of sustainability is widespread identify existing mechanisms that can help target behavior change. NORESCO knows that the energy for change impactful, energy-wasting behaviors. It savings realized by installing energy-efficient also guides strategies designed to enhance energy devices and systems are only a fraction of the total consumption knowledge and promote other energy possible savings that can be realized institution-wide. efficiencies. Assessment is key to our program, so the Regardless of old, inefficient technology or new, HBEA further serves as a baseline from which to gauge efficient technology, energy conservation begins with program effectiveness and then guide modifications. 37
  • chapter 1 CAMPUS Leadership | White Paper the building occupants. Changing the behavior of effectiveness in each iteration. As a result, the Energy building occupants not only increases the total energy Conservation Through Behavior Change program, savings, but also leverages the savings generated in conjunction with other existing sustainability by the newly installed energy-efficient devices and activities, gradually changes the campus culture systems. By changing the institutional way of life to to a conserving way of life, taking full advantage of a more “conserving” culture, an enhanced use of old, the substantial and numerous benefits this type of inefficient technologies can be combined with the use change can bring to the college or university, the of new technologies to play a role in the total energy community and society at large. savings achieved. Changing the culture by changing behavior, and sustaining that change over time, can Deployed concurrently with Sustainable Behavior make the ESPC more effective and rewarding than Change is the Green Schoolhouse Curriculum other conservation initiatives implemented. Enhancement component. It features hands-on educational activities for students (often created The Sustainable Behavior Change component from the building retrofits) and strengthens academic consists of a scientifically rigorous and well- learning. In this way, students also participate in the documented process designed by the author that is performance contract while utilizing project-based implemented in conjunction and cooperation with instruction and tools to become better environmental staff, faculty and students. The process initially stewards. With specially designed class projects, measures behaviors, knowledge, attitudes, social students may also bring family and community into norms, perceptions of control, and other energy-use the energy-efficiency process. The holistic approach factors among members of the focal community. affects all stakeholders through a well-received Assessing these factors allows us to create a custom and comprehensive initiative—that of saving money, behavioral intervention for the focal members using energy and carbon emissions while upgrading existing mechanisms that already exist and are functioning structures—all paid for through energy savings. within the community. Multiple indicators confirm that the Energy Additionally, assessing change within these energy Conservation Through Behavior Change program consumption factors (using pre-/post-intervention is effective. For example, in a treatment versus data) guides future program modification. Energy control experimental study conducted at a mid-sized Conservation Through Behavior Change® is a university in Pennsylvania, energy conservation dynamic program, and therefore is modified after behaviors increased among students living in each intervention period prior to subsequent the residence hall in which our program was implementations. In this way, specific components implemented, as compared to a control hall. Energy of the process can be modified, added or deleted conservation awareness, perceived control and based on current situational needs and demonstrated knowledge expanded, while attitudes and social efficiencies. This leads to improved program norms improved. Pre-program versus post-program metered utility data demonstrate a building-level 38 w w w. c l i m a t e n e u t r a l c a m p u s . c o m  “ he holistic approach impacts T all stakeholders through a wellreceived and comprehensive initiative—that of saving money, energy and carbon emissions while upgrading existing structures—all paid for through energy savings.” decrease of 9 percent in electricity consumption (Graph 1) and a building-level decrease of 22 percent in water consumption (Graph 2). In a recent assessment at another university without building-level meters, pre- versus post-program selfreport energy conservation behaviors increased an average of 17 percent (Graph 3). Interestingly, even though only four behaviors were targeted for change, all energy conservation behaviors assessed
  • >  raph 1 G Comparison of metered electricity usage before ECTBC implementation and after ECTBC implementation (presented in kilowatt hours per student per week) measured a decline in usage of 9 percent. >  raph 2 G Comparison of metered water usage before ECTBC implementation and after ECTBC implementation measured a decline of 22 percent. 39 > Graph 3 Comparison of self-reported energy conservation behaviors showed an increase of 17 percent, including behaviors that were not targeted for change.
  • chapter 1 CAMPUS Leadership | White Paper  “ n summary, considering I the people element of energy efficiency and structuring cognitive programs around focal groups can boost the effectiveness of performance contracting along multiple dimensions.” moved in the desired direction, demonstrating the added value of a holistic approach that combines building retrofit energy efficiencies with a custom behavior-change program. In summary, considering the people element of energy efficiency and structuring cognitive programs around focal groups can boost the effectiveness of performance contracting along multiple dimensions. About the Author 40 w w w. c l i m a t e n e u t r a l c a m p u s . c o m Dr. Scott Finlinson, PhD., the creator of the Energy Conservation Through Behavior Change® program, has personally implemented and managed custom, sustainable behavior-change programs at colleges, universities, K–12 school districts, and state and county governments with success in both self-reported and metered results. He holds a Ph.D. in industrial–organizational psychology from Ohio University, and leads NORESCO’s behavior-change initiatives. NORESCO specializes in the development, design, construction, financing and operation of energy and environmental efficiency projects, performance contracting and central energy plants. NORESCO is a subsidiary of Carrier Corp, which is a unit of United Technologies Corp. (NYSE:UTX).
  • chapter 1 CAMPUS Leadership | White Paper Using SustainabilityFocused Learning on Higher-Education Campuses to Benefit Our Communities A member of the Quapaw tribe of Oklahoma relates his experience researching the most economical and feasible renewable resource for his tribe’s energy needs as a part of his internship program By Brandon Bandy, Haskell Indian Nations University In the summer of 2011 I took part in the Haskell Environmental Research Studies (HERS) internship, on the Haskell Indian Nations University campus. One of the goals of the internship is to give native students an opportunity to gain research experience. This internship also pairs students with graduatelevel mentors from the University of Kansas to help them succeed with their project and learn more about graduate school. 42 w w w. c l i m a t e n e u t r a l c a m p u s . c o m While reviewing material about renewable resources on tribal land, I found a quote from the intertribalcoup.org that illustrates the importance of investing in renewable energy for tribes: “Up to ninety cents of every dollar the Tribes spend on energy leaves immediately—lost forever to all of the economic leverage and benefits this money could create within tribal communities.” For my project I decided to research the energy use of my tribe, and the renewable resource potential of the Quapaw tribal jurisdictional area. My research question was “Can the Quapaw tribe benefit from renewable resources?” In my attempt to answer this question I first determined the Quapaw tribe’s energy use and second researched energy potential and the cost of equipment necessary to make use of this energy. To determine the energy use of the Quapaw tribe, I called the tribal building to speak with the tribal administrator about reviewing tribal utility bills. After receiving permission, I drove to the tribal building and reviewed the utility bills to compile them. “ p to ninety cents of every dollar U the Tribes spend on energy leaves immediately—lost forever to all of the economic leverage and benefits this money could create within tribal communities.”
  • I recorded energy use for the month of April, as well as the companies from which the energy was purchased. I used the month of April because it serves as a good control month. April typically requires the least heating or cooling out of the 12 months of the year, so, using it as a control month helps eliminate inflation from a particularly hot or cold year. To calculate annual energy use, the month of April was multiplied 12 times with a 10 percent increase in energy use factored in for the months of June, July and August. After acquiring this information I was able to work with my mentor to calculate CO2 emissions as a result of this energy use based on the type of energy production employed by the companies that supply energy to the Quapaw tribe. Using this information, the following table was constructed. “ fter acquiring this information I A was able to work with my mentor to calculate CO2 emissions as a result of this energy use based on the type of energy production employed by the companies which supply energy to the Quapaw tribe.” NREL finds that there is not significant photovoltaic potential in the area. This suggests that solar energy production will be ineffective on a macro scale. Smallscale investment in solar power may be worthwhile; for example, the installation of solar panels on individual buildings and businesses or the installation of solarpowered water heaters. Using the method that was previously described for researching economic wind energy, I found the most economic solar energy panel installation was available from Sunrise Energy >  These annual figures were determined using extrapola-tions based on tribal utilities bills, not including the Downstream Resort, or Quapaw Casino. Alternatives in Edmond, OK. After creating this table, I needed to research renewable energy potential available to the Quapaw tribe. The primary source for this information was National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) energy potential maps available at nrel.gov. The energy maps used were for wind, solar and geothermal. a sale price of $12,500 for ten 225 watt panels. According to the NREL, the area the Quapaw tribe occupies is in the “poor” wind power class, making wind energy development infeasible. and providing total energy produced averaged Sunrise Energy Alternatives was currently offering Each panel would produce approximately 2.25 kWh or less than 1 percent of energy use. If this installation were applied to ten tribal buildings this would equal approximately 8 percent of energy use. This installation would cost approximately $125,000, out to the constant 8 percent, this solution would take approximately 15 years to reach a return on investment. Using Internet resources and phone calls to Oklahoma businesses specializing in wind energy to research the most economic installation for wind energy generation, I found that at this time (summer 2011) the most economic installation was available from Bergey Windpower, a company based out of Norman, Oklahoma. The best installation in terms of price would be a small-scale wind power installation that costs about $50,000. In order for this installation to operate it requires a wind rating of 2 by Bergey. The area the Quapaw tribe occupies reaches a 2 only in certain locations, making it difficult to determine if any return would be achieved. Geothermal is identified by NREL to be a favorable renewable resource present on Quapaw land. There are various methods for harnessing geothermal energy. Two common methods are power plants and heat pumps. Geothermal power plants utilize ground heat to turn turbines to create electricity. Geothermal heat pumps use the natural relatively constant temperature of the earth as a heat sink and heat source, respectively, to reduce heating and cooling costs (geo-energy.org). 43
  • chapter 1 CAMPUS Leadership | White Paper While each of these methods has several employable options geothermal heat pumps are more likely to be a viable solution. This is because power plants require a larger investment to produce energy. Geothermal heat pumps are on a scale more congruent with the needs of the Quapaw tribe. An investment in geothermal heat pumps could reduce cost and demand for fossil fuel energy for the Quapaw tribe. In fact geothermal heat pumps can operate in areas with less geothermal energy than northeast Oklahoma and have potential for many tribes and individuals. According to the NREL, “geothermal heat pumps use much less energy than conventional heating systems, since they draw heat from the ground. Not only does this save energy and money, it reduces air pollution. All areas of the United States have nearly constant shallow-ground temperatures, which are suitable for geothermal heat pumps.” It can be difficult to predetermine savings from geothermal heat pumps as they do not directly produce a measurable amount of electricity. Instead they reduce the amount of electricity needed by using the earth as a heat sink. Using the method previously described, I found that at this time the most economical geothermal heat pump installation in Oklahoma is delivered by Sunrise Energy Alternatives. It lists $20,000 as an estimated installed price for a 4-ton system, which would be an appropriately sized system for an industrial application. Installing four of these systems would cost approximately $80,000. Using the conservative 44 w w w. c l i m a t e n e u t r a l c a m p u s . c o m “ REL finds that there is not N significant photovoltaic potential in the area. This suggests that solar energy production will be ineffective on a macro scale. Small-scale investment in solar power may be worthwhile; for example, the installation of solar panels on individual buildings and businesses or the installation of solar-powered water heaters.” “ eothermal is identified by G NREL to be a favorable renewable resource present on Quapaw land. There are various methods for harnessing geothermal energy. Two common methods are power plants and heat pumps.” estimate of a savings of 25 percent total energy cost, a return on investment could be reached in four years. Based on the research shown here, geothermal energy is the only renewable resource energy option that warrants significant investment for the Quapaw tribe at this time. Though large-scale implementation of the other renewable resource energy options is not currently economically feasible, small investment may be feasible, and this may change in the future with potentially more efficient equipment or lower cost. I would like to thank the HERS program, Dr. Joane Nagel and Dr. Daniel Wildcat, the program mentors, the Quapaw Tribe EPA and Administration, Lindsey Witthaus, Paula Smith and Mike Dunaway for their help, contributions and advice.
  • About the Author Brandon Bandy is an enrolled member of the Quapaw tribe of Oklahoma and an alumnus of Haskell Indian Nations University’s school of Indigenous and American Indian Studies. Bandy is passionate about Indigenous issues and climate change. This passion was fostered and developed by the study of climate change and its effects on indigenous peoples during two terms as an NSF/EPSCORE intern with the Haskell Environmental Research studies, and work with a Green Campus Building grant from UNCF. Currently, Bandy is working for the Quapaw tribe as a compliance agent for the Quapaw Tribal Gaming Agency, and is maintaining connections to the issues that remain dear to his heart. Future plans include graduate work related to climate change and indigenous peoples, continued work for the Quapaw tribe and involvement in issues that Bandy views as important such as striving for greener practices, involvement in the native community and working for a better tomorrow. 45
  • chapter 1 CAMPUS Leadership | White Paper Integrating Indigenous Principles of Sustainability into Higher Education Creating opportunities for students to apply their education in sustainability toward serving their communities advances sustainable principles while promoting resilient communities By Dr. Daniel R. Wildcat, Haskell Indian Nations University One challenge of greening a campus at the beginning of the 21st century is to recognize that there is not a one-size-fits-all solution for all campuses. When we think of developing renewable energies, green building designs, sustainable landscaping, recycling, and conservation, the way in which a campus will reduce its carbon footprint depends on the geography and culture of the campus. From American Indian and Alaska 46 Native perspectives the key to sustainability is the w w w. c l i m a t e n e u t r a l c a m p u s . c o m community: a deep-spatial concept that recognizes that to live well on this planet humankind must “ rom American Indian and F Alaska Native perspectives the key to sustainability is the community: a deep-spatial concept that recognizes that to live well on this planet humankind must initiate an active reengagement in what can be called the nature-culture nexus.” initiate an active reengagement in what can be called the nature-culture nexus. The biggest misstep taken by humankind as we developed technologies and increasingly complex societies was the separation of culture from nature, or more accurately the physical environments— landscapes and seascapes—that gave us our unique cultural identities. From indigenous perspectives it is not only reasonable but natural to understand the beauty of cultural diversity on the planet to be inextricably tied to the biological and ecological diversity of the planet: humankind is situated in a symbiotic nature-culture nexus.
  • 4.  ommunities cannot exist without good C “ he focus on relationships requires T that we start examining processes. By examining how we do things  as well as opportunities for reducing waste and improving efficiencies, life-enhancing opportunities can emerge.” relationships. From an indigenous perspective, the environmental and ecological crises we face emerge in large part from human inattentiveness to our natural relatives. The point seems simple, but it is profound—we don’t use-up and exhaust relatives. This partial list of principles, I would argue, moves us toward community sustainability in a fundamentally ecological manner. The indigenous peoples I have had the good fortune to work with seem to Even as we spend increasing amounts of our time understand sustainability is about community, and in cyberspaces—whether we are using our iPads, that includes the ecological community of which we smartphones, GPS navigation or simply computers— humans are but one, albeit powerful, member. we are using them while sitting, standing or going somewhere tangible. It is crucial that we share ideas and innovations in technology, but in order to determine what is Even with our Myspace pages, Facebook friends and appropriate for use on our campuses we need to cyber-communities, we still reside someplace on the conduct a community assessment just as much as we planet. We have friends, family, students, colleagues need an energy audit or other quantitative measures and tangible landscapes and environments we of what we use and consume. Who we are, how we live within on our campuses. If we fail to pay do things, and what we do are not just the results of attention to this reality and, most importantly, if large structural and institutional imperatives; they get we fail to approach campuses as communities—in down to the nitty-gritty of who we are and what we all their diversity within and between campuses— aspire to be as members of a community. sustainability becomes little more than the catchphrase du jour. Creating opportunities for the young to demonstrate cultural community competencies is an important With community sustainability first and foremost, part of the cultures in which we participate. With the principles of indigenous sustainability I have this demonstration comes community resilience. seen demonstrated in indigenous communities At Haskell Indian Nations University, we encourage across the planet are as follows: students to understand science and technology and explore how it might fit within their own 1.  eject the formulation that nature is full of R resources: think in terms of relatives. communities. A good example of this education effort is demonstrated every summer in the National 2.  nce you adopt a worldview where you O understand the other-than-human life and features of nature you depend on are relatives, you can focus on relationships and respect. We use resources. We respect relatives: human and other than human. 3.  he focus on relationships requires that we start T examining processes. By examining how we do things as well as opportunities for reducing waste and improving efficiencies, life-enhancing opportunities can emerge. “ t is crucial that we share ideas I and innovations in technology, but in order to determine what is appropriate for use on our campuses we need to conduct a community assessment just as much as we need an energy audit or other quantitative measures of what we use and consume.” 47
  • chapter 1 CAMPUS Leadership | White Paper Science Foundation-funded summer Research Experiences for Undergraduates program, the Haskell Environmental Research Studies (HERS) Climate Institute. The advancement of sustainability in our communities requires creating opportunities for young women and men to develop the tools they need to promote resiliency within their own community. The work of Brandon Bandy, a member of the Quapaw tribe of “ he advancement of T sustainability in our communities requires creating opportunities for young women and men to develop the tools they need to promote resiliency within their own community.” Oklahoma, a participant in the 2011 HERS Climate Institute, is a good example of what we must do within our university and college campuses to make sure that in the midst of all the technological innovation that surrounds us, we do not forget sustainability is ultimately about community. About the Author 48 w w w. c l i m a t e n e u t r a l c a m p u s . c o m Dr. Daniel Wildcat, Ph.D., is a professor at Haskell Indian Nations University in Lawrence, Kansas, and an accomplished scholar who writes on indigenous knowledge, technology, environment, and education. He is also co-director of the Haskell Environmental Research Studies Center, which he founded with colleagues from the Center for Hazardous Substance Research at Kansas State University. A Yuchi member of the Muscogee Nation of Oklahoma, Dr. Wildcat is the co-author, with Vine Deloria Jr., of Power and Place: Indian Education in America (Fulcrum, 2001), and co-editor, with Steve Pavlik, of Destroying Dogma: Vine Deloria Jr., and His Influence on American Society (Fulcrum, 2006). Known for his commitment to environmental defense and cultural diversity, Dr. Wildcat has been honored by the Kansas City organization The Future Is Now with the Heart Peace Award. His newest book is Red Alert! Saving the Planet with Indigenous Knowledge.
  • Saving energy shouldn’t mean depleting capital. sie_UNCF_ad_final.indd 1 10/25/11 2:1
  • chapter 1 CAMPUS Leadership | White Paper Minority-Serving Institutions: Harbingers of Education for Sustainability The function of the university is not simply to teach breadwinning, or furnish teachers for public schools or to be a centre of polite society; it is, above all, to be the organ of that fine adjustment between real life and the growing knowledge of life, an adjustment which forms the secret of civilization. — W.E.B. DuBois, The Souls of Black Folk (1903) By Dr. Fatemeh Shafiei, Spelman College 50 w w w. c l i m a t e n e u t r a l c a m p u s . c o m In 1987, in its path-breaking report Our Common Future, the World Commission on Environment and Development concluded that the people of the world are living in an unsustainable manner that degrades the environment and negatively alters Earth’s ecosystems. The report’s recommendation was that the world should pursue a sustainable path to development that would meet the needs of the present generation without jeopardizing the ability of future generations to meet their needs. The report also advised a balanced attention to social development, economic development, and environmental protection now and in the future (World Commission on Environment and Development 1987). Although the “sustainable development” concept achieved prominence through the publication of the report, the concept is not new. It is very much embedded in the ancient Native American proverb that states “Treat earth well… We do not inherit the Earth from our ancestors; we borrow it from our children” (Quotes from Our Native Past, undated). Noting that “sustainable development” is a muchcontested notion and that there is more than one definition for the term, this paper uses the concept of just sustainability, which integrates environmental justice, social justice, economic equity and sustainability. Just sustainability is defined as “the need to ensure a better quality of life for all, now and “ ust sustainability is defined as J ‘the need to ensure a better quality of life for all, now and into the future, in a just and equitable manner, while living within the limits of supporting ecosystems.’” – Agyeman, Bullard and Evans 2003
  • into the future, in a just and equitable manner, while living within the limits of supporting ecosystems” (Agyeman, Bullard and Evans 2003). As Victor Hugo once remarked,“An invasion of armies can be resisted, but not an idea whose time has come.” All facts indicate that the time has come for a just sustainable world. One way to achieve the transformation from an unsustainable world to a sustainable one would be to turn a critical eye on the higher education institutions that prepare the next generation of educators who will shape the society’s worldview, and produce the next generation of leaders, professionals, and policymakers who will manage the society’s institutions and resources. There is a need for an education that takes into consideration— and reconciles with the requirement to balance—the increasing material demand amid scarce and declining resources while protecting the ecosystem. Moreover, we need an education that treats and values everyone regardless of race or economic status. Based on three imperatives—moral, economic and social—minority-serving institutions (MSIs) are the right institutions to serve as change agents that will lead the effort toward framing and advancing sustainable living through education for sustainability. First, the moral imperative is based on the fact that the burden of the environmental hazards and their associated health risks fall disproportionately on people of color and poor communities. The quest for justice has been the hallmark of MSIs. As such, MSIs’ moral obligations— deriving from their history, legacy and mission to set right what others have done wrong—makes them uniquely qualified to be an integral part of the solution. Second, the economic imperative is that the sustainable green economy provides a great opportunity for jobs and a market for those with the right education and training to create solutions that address the substantial environmental challenges that are facing humanity. Third, the social imperative is that we are living in a diverse world that mandates that leadership reflect diversity. The solution requires lifting the voices of all stakeholders, including people of color, indigenous peoples, women and the poor, and crafting those marginalized voices into the solution. “ ased on three imperatives— B moral, economic and social— minority-serving institutions (MSIs) are the right institutions to serve as change agents that will lead the effort toward framing and advancing sustainable living through education for sustainability.” More than 20 years after the publication of Our Common Future, and more than a decade into the new millennium, climate change and its long-term threat against humans and the natural environment are dominating the global environmental agenda. The inherent risks of climate change have spurred a great deal of concern. The big push for education and campus sustainability for the most part is driven by the threat of climate change. The United Nations Human Development Report 2007/8 warns: “Climate change is the defining human development challenge of the 21st Century” (UNDP 2007). MSIs can adopt education for just sustainability as a guiding principle to be integrated into education, research, campus operation and community service. MSIs must be the harbingers of mainstreaming “Sustainability Across the Curriculum.” MSIs need to develop new courses, and revise the existing ones to incorporate just sustainability and make it a foundation for teaching, learning, and living in the new millennium. MSIs have to spearhead building capacity and competencies through faculty development in just sustainability and campus and community stewardship. The complexity of the effects of climate change compels scholars to look beyond disciplinary boundaries. We need to make environmental literacy and competency part of both the general and core educational experience for all students, move away from the overwhelming dominance of disciplinary foci in learning and research and toward a broader, integrated interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary approach, and shift to a system of thinking that is inclined to fostering sustainability. 51
  • chapter 1 CAMPUS Leadership | White Paper These efforts are not enough to counteract the “ ustainability must be understood S and considered in every realm of MSIs, which in turn need to ensure that their graduates have the skills and knowledge necessary to bring about change by creating a sustainable world.” effects of climate change, however. More needs to be done and there is a tremendous opportunity to do more! This new focus on sustainability speaks volumes about the commitment that MSIs have made toward sustainability; and where there has been a lag in their efforts, lack of resources has been identified as the stumbling block preventing them from fulfilling their goals toward sustainability. There is a gap between the resources at MSIs’ MSIs, therefore, need to spearhead the efforts disposal and the magnitude of the task before toward education for sustainability. MSIs have been them. At first glance, given the current fiscal crisis, at the forefront of educating minority students and winning support for education for sustainability have relentlessly fought for access to education appears daunting as MSIs more than ever before are for people of color; they should be proud of their experiencing the brunt of the economic challenges outstanding past achievements. Education for facing the nation. The financial resources of MSIs sustainability has profound consequences for are becoming even scarcer at a time when the need preparing the next generation of leaders and has for action has become ever more urgent. While important implications for the transformation of earnings from endowments are dwindling, the need the society. Sustainability must be understood and for the financial support of students is skyrocketing. considered in every realm of MSIs, which in turn As these MSIs strive to cope with these economic need to ensure that their graduates have the skills imperatives, taking steps now to limit the future and knowledge necessary to bring about change by impact of climate change might appear too costly, creating a sustainable world. and something that they can very well do without. Yet, apathy is not an option. The short-term costs MSIs have already made great strides toward might seem significant, but the long-term benefit sustainability on their campuses. According to society is enormous, particularly when “going to Minority-Serving Institutions Green Report: green” could be economically savvy, and the initial 2010 Campus Sustainability Survey, more than cost could be balanced by long-term environmental one-third of the participating MSIs have signed the American College & University Presidents’ Climate Commitment; more than 60 percent and economic benefits. Inaction is going to be more expensive in terms of the economic, social and environmental cost. have green buildings already on campus or under construction; more than one-third have already made commitments (or are working toward making 52 commitments) to reduce their carbon emissions; almost one-third have completed the greenhouse w w w. c l i m a t e n e u t r a l c a m p u s . c o m gas inventory or are in the process of completing it; nearly two-thirds of dining halls serve local food and nearly half of them offer trayless dinning; and slightly less than half offer environmental studies majors or minors (UNCF 2011). These are just a few examples of much good work that MSIs have done toward greening their operations and reducing their ecological footprint. “ he short-term costs might seem T significant, but the long-term benefit to society is enormous, particularly when ‘going green’ could be economically savvy, and the initial cost could be balanced by long-term environmental and economic benefits. Inaction is going to be more expensive in terms of the economic, social and environmental cost. ”
  • Conclusion In his “Letter from Birmingham Jail,” Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. eloquently wrote: “Human progress never rolls in on wheels of inevitability. It comes through tireless efforts and persistent work… and without this hard work time itself becomes an ally of the forces of social stagnation. We must use time creatively—and forever realize that the time is always ripe to do right.” This is the time for MSIs to be engaged and lead the effort toward education for sustainability. Unless MSIs intentionally focus on just sustainability and economic equity, and engage all stakeholders in crafting solutions for a sustainable future, the concerns of people of color and vulnerable citizens are going to be overlooked. The time for leadership is now if we dare to dream and make a just sustainable world a reality. About the Author Fatemeh Shafiei, Ph.D., is an associate professor of political science and co-chair of the Sustainability Committee at Spelman College. She is a member of the Academic Advisory Board for the Annual Editions: Sustainability published by McGraw-Hill Higher Education Contemporary Learning Series. Dr. Shafiei has served as an Environmental Fellow at Associated Colleges of the South. She has successfully secured several federally funded grants from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and a grant from the UNCF/Mellon Program, and served as principal investigator for those projects. Dr. Shafiei served as project director for the Spelman College/U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Teachers’ Environmental Institute. She was also the principal investigator for the UNCF/Mellon Program-funded project “Education for Sustainability: Greening the College Curriculum Institute.” Dr. Shafiei’s work on environmental policy, particularly within the state of Georgia, resulted in her extensive analysis of environmental laws passed by the Georgia legislature, documented in nine chapters on environmental policy in Georgia Legislative Review. 53
  • Chapter Finance The global financial crisis has placed further economic hardships on already cash-strapped minority-serving colleges and universities. Constrained budgets make implementing sustainability initiatives a fiscal impossibility for many higher education institutions. Fortunately, organizations such as UNCF, Second Nature, Environmental Defense Fund and SYNERGY GROUP are working to create strategic partnerships that make it possible for under-resourced minority-serving colleges and universities to receive funding for sustainability plans. Many such institutions have already benefited from grants, public/ private partnerships and collaborations with independent sponsors.
  • chapter 2 Finance | Case Study Bridging the Gap Between Higher Education and Community Engagement Building strong partnerships between higher education institutions and surrounding communities fosters successful collaborative, sustainable energy-efficiency programs that benefit all stakeholders Case Study by Sharon Campbell, SYNERGY GROUP, and Henry M. Lancaster II, Lancaster Craig & Associates SYNERGY Development and Training Group, and Lancaster Craig & Associates (LCA), collaborate on creating strategic partnerships to address community and economic development gaps between the public sectors, non-profit organizations and private enterprise. One of our signature models is Strategic Partnership & Alliance Development. We accomplish this by developing strong partnership among towns, communities, counties, regions, and private and non-profit organizations to foster community/ economic development of job creation. Our hands-on training approach guides partners in gaining a competitive advantage for growth opportunities via access to resources, markets, technologies, capital and talented people. Our approach enhances an organization’s capacity for sustainability by allowing for greater flexibility, encouraging mutual benefits for all parties, addressing internal weaknesses, and assisting cooperating partners to gain new skills and areas of competence. energy consumption habits to improve savings—all in line with confronting the anticipated impacts of climate change and sea-level rise. We also promote the design of sustainable energy-efficiency programs and policies, as well as supporting developing green energy business opportunities and assisting in locating financing support for green projects. The institutions offer the human capital while the community provides the mechanisms for engagement in the emerging green economy. In working at the Elizabeth City State University, we helped design and implement a 21-county regional Green Economy Initiative called “Your Place in the New Economy: Tools & Opportunities for Jobs & Economic Development.” As the managing director, we oversaw the development of strategic partnerships, technical assistance, policy analysis and development, environment issue analysis, government outreach, and job creation (both on and off campus); we also implemented priority activities 56 w w w. c l i m a t e n e u t r a l c a m p u s . c o m We focus our efforts on colleges and universities because they offer a host of talent, skills and services that can support community and energy conservation/ sustainability goals. Our model bridges the gap that exists between the higher education classroom experience and community engagement. Our inclusive partnership strategy focuses on promoting sustainable renewable energy use, fostering energyefficient building design and construction, increasing the use of alternative fuel vehicles, and modifying “ e focus our efforts on colleges W and universities because they offer a host of talent, skills and services that can support community and energy conservation/sustainability goals.”
  • “ e at SYNERGY and LCA believe W that building collaborations between universities and the communities they serve will help to change attitudes toward energy conservation principles, and play a major role in bringing about new ways of thinking when it comes to solving energy problems across the nation.” Inclusiveness, strategic partnerships and alliances provide the infrastructure for sound and solid human capacity and knowledge-building, with an eye to creating resource growth opportunities that will benefit all. and provided resources for projects, including designing a regional green economic development plan between the university and the region. The ECSU project focused on what we viewed as the essential components of green business opportunities for the region: energy production/biotechnology; energy efficiency; storm-water management via low-impact design; recycling industries and green manufacturing; agriculture; heritage/eco-tourism; and green education, resources and training. The university’s primary role was to develop and maintain a research infrastructure for data collection and analysis, and, through active collaboration, design and conduct behavioral science research and program evaluations. The project generated more than 75 partnerships between community organizations, government agencies, businesses, and both public and private higher education institutions. Our work with Bennett College for Women as a strategic partner made it possible for the school to receive funding to design a campus-wide sustainable energy-efficiency plan, and brought about a partnership with the Environment Defense Fund Energy Efficiency Program to assign a Climate Corps Fellow to help develop a practical and actionable energy-efficiency plan for the campus. We at SYNERGY and LCA believe that building collaborations between universities and the communities they serve will help to change attitudes toward energy conservation principles, and play a major role in bringing about new ways of thinking when it comes to solving energy problems across the nation. We also see endless opportunities for groups that traditionally have not worked together. About the Authors Sharon Campbell is founder and president of The SYNERGY GROUP, a North Carolina-based strategic development company that bridges the gap between large and small community programs with public, private, government, profit and non-profit organizations, associations and corporations. As managing director of the Green Center for Research and Evaluation at Elizabeth City State University, she is responsible for cultivating relationships and formulating partnerships among those participating in the development of the Green Industry Initiative as set forth in the North Carolina Legislative abstract. She serves as a trainer for “The Climate Project,” an initiative created by former Vice President Al Gore to educate the public about the harmful effects of climate change on the environment, and work toward solutions. Campbell holds an associate degree from Durham Technical Community College, a bachelor of science in public administration from Shaw University, and an MBA from Walden University. Henry M. Lancaster II is principal and manager of Lancaster Craig & Associates, a lobbying, association management and community relations firm in downtown Raleigh, North Carolina. The firm’s client base includes local governments, trade associations, non-profits, public universities and private business concerns. Lancaster is a graduate of the Northeastern University School of Law in Boston, Massachusetts and Lincoln University in Pennsylvania. He is currently a board member of the North Carolina Professional Lobbyists Association and Audubon NC, a member of the Institute for the Environment/UNC Board of Visitors, and former chair of the North Carolina Arboretum Board of Directors. 57
  • chapter 2 Finance | White Paper Minority-Serving Institutions Championing The American College & University Presidents’ Climate Commitment Together, Second Nature and UNCF are helping under-resourced and minority-serving institutions become active members of the sustainability movement By Ashka Naik on behalf of Second Nature 58 w w w. c l i m a t e n e u t r a l c a m p u s . c o m The American College & University Presidents’ Climate Commitment (ACUPCC) is an institutional pledge to promote climate and sustainability education and research, and to reduce—and eventually eliminate—net greenhouse gas emissions. It is a high-visibility national network of higher education institutions implementing a successful, comprehensive strategy to accelerate progress toward climate neutrality and sustainability. Second Nature is the lead supporting organization of the ACUPCC. To date, more than 675 colleges and universities from all 50 states and the District of Columbia have become signatories to the ACUPCC, and are measuring their carbon footprints and developing climate action plans toward the goal of climate neutrality. Many ACUPCC presidents have incorporated sustainability into their institutional strategic plans and discovered that it brings the campus stakeholders together and motivates them in ways not possible previously. The ACUPCC signatory institutions represent 5.8 million students—about one-third of all college and university students in the United States. To level the playing field by bridging the resource gap between the rich and the under-resourced institutions, and to enable more institutions to commit to and implement the ACUPCC, Second Nature is proactively developing innovative programs that enhance the sustainability capacity of underresourced institutions. To actively engage minorityserving institutions in this sustainability movement, Second Nature has also partnered with UNCF on the UNCF Building Green at Minority-Serving Institutions initiative, and provided guidance on UNCF’s sustainability efforts for the past two years. With the assistance of such collaborative capacitybuilding opportunities and the framework offered
  • Second Nature and UNCF “Environmental sustainability is a critical part of operating every college and a critical part of the education a 21st-century college provides to its students. Second Nature has been an invaluable thought partner in helping UNCF, its member historically black colleges and universities, and all minority-serving institutions to make sustainability not just an ideal but a day-to-day reality. UNCF’s partnership with Second Nature has fostered a re-imagination of how minority-serving institutions relate to our environment and what we are capable of doing together to assure a safer, greener and cleaner planet.” – Michael L. Lomax, President and CEO, UNCF through the ACUPCC model, 87 minority-serving institutions—including two college districts—have made deep commitments to climate neutrality by signing the ACUPCC in the recent years. By providing the needed momentum and network, the ACUPCC assists these institutions in pursuing climate neutrality, galvanizing the campus community, reducing costs, and opening up new opportunities for funding, education, research and community engagement. Since January 2010, presidents of 15 minority-serving institutions have signed the ACUPCC and committed their institutions to climate action. Success stories of the ACUPCC signatory minority-serving institutions Despite the barriers—such as smaller endowments, limited peer-to-peer knowledge exchange, and With their strong commitment to and continuing practice of sustainability, these institutions will help train and educate students of diverse sociocultural backgrounds to become sustainably aware professionals and global citizens, and also set superior standards for environmental and social equity for future generations. Here are a few stellar examples of the “green journey” undertaken by four of the minority-serving institutions that have recently signed the ACUPCC: •  Elizabeth City State University (ESCU)—Chancellor Willie Gilchrist signed the commitment for ESCU on May 25, 2010, as a result of the collaborative work of this historically black university, UNCF and Second Nature. To kick off campus sustainability efforts, the institution was selected as the winner of Home Depot’s $50,000 ”Retool Your School” grant contest. The grant was offered to help upgrade ESCU’s athletic facilities and create a new sustainable baseball field. inadequate in-house expertise—these institutions are marching forward and making sustainability an integral part of their development and planning priorities. For their exemplary efforts vis-à-vis sustainability, several of the ACUPCC signatory minority-serving institutions, e.g., the College of Menominee Nation, Delaware State University, Elizabeth City State University, Los Angeles TradeTechnical College, Morehouse College, Spelman College, United Tribes Technical College and Voorhees College, have also been awarded green technical assistance grants by Second Nature, UNCF and various federal agencies. “ o actively engage minorityT serving institutions in this sustainability movement, Second Nature has also partnered with UNCF on the UNCF Building Green at Minority-Serving Institutions initiative, and provided guidance on UNCF’s sustainability efforts for the past two years.” 59
  • chapter 2 Finance | White Paper •  Spelman College—Under President Beverly Daniel Tatum’s leadership, as well as with senior management’s determination, this historically black college has been successfully transforming its campus into a sustainable community for the past few years. Dr. Tatum signed the Commitment for Spelman College on August 25, 2010. In 2008, Spelman completed its first LEED® Silver building with the construction of “The Suites” residential hall. This project is significant not only because it is the first construction to take place on Spelman’s campus in the 21st century, but also because it is the first LEED®-certified building at any historically black college and university in the country. •  United Tribes Technical College (UTTC)—By signing the commitment on July 23, 2010, President David Gipp reinforced UTTC’s commitment to sustainability and climate action. Curtis Maynard, Facility Manager with UTTC, played a pivotal role in this process as he diligently worked to convene campus stakeholders as well as propel campuswide greening actions. Second Nature awarded him the 2009 Kresge Fellowship Award, enabling him to attend networking and educational events focused on campus sustainability. •  Clark Atlanta University (CAU)—As a historically black university and the largest of UNCF’s 39 member institutions, CAU made a powerful commitment to sustainability when President Carlton Brown ceremoniously signed the commitment on February 22, 2011. With the collaborative activities among the Atlanta University Center Consortium institutions and exceptional on-campus leadership, CAU is advancing toward its sustainability goals in leaps and bounds. 60 w w w. c l i m a t e n e u t r a l c a m p u s . c o m The ACUPCC signatory minorityserving institutions at the 16th Conference of Parties (COP16) In addition to the ongoing collaboration between UNCF and Second Nature, the two organizations hosted a special side event during the 16th edition of Conference of the Parties (COP16) of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) at the Meridian Hotel in Cancun, Mexico, on Friday, December 3, 2010. The session featured U.S. colleges and universities that are exercising >  resident Carlton Brown signing the ACUPCC P (Credit: Art Frazier - Spelman College) >  he Panelists of the ACUPCC Session at COP16 T (Credit: Ashka Naik - Second Nature) leadership in addressing climate change and are committed to becoming climate-neutral by signing the ACUPCC. During the session, representatives from UNCF, Second Nature and signatory minority-serving institutions shared best practices from historically black, Hispanic-serving, and tribal colleges and universities that have signed the ACUPCC. Senior officials from signatory institutions, each at a different stage in the ACUPCC process, described how the ACUPCC provides a framework for promoting and institutionalizing sustainability. A staff member from Second Nature provided a national overview of the ACUPCC model as a galvanizing strategy to address collective climate action. Focusing on its work
  • with institutions that serve large numbers of ethnic and racial minority students, UNCF shared how the ACUPCC has effectively worked for campuses with diverse missions and cultures. forth to remain in fulfillment of the commitment. This fulfillment rate at minority-serving institutions is slightly higher than the 65.5 percent fulfillment rate of the network as a whole. These data are very strong— particularly for a voluntary initiative—underscoring the Reporting status of the ACUPCC signatory minority-serving institutions diligence with which these signatory institutions are successfully spearheading sustainability practice and climate action on their campuses. As of 2010, nearly 67 percent of the 85 minorityserving institutions that are reporting signatories to the ACUPCC were currently “in good standing” with the initiative, meaning they are not behind in To view references and sources please visit www.climateneutralcampus.com submitting their public reports by the deadlines set About the Author Ashka Naik, LEED AP, joined Second Nature in January 2009 as a program manager for the Advancing Green Building in Higher Education initiative, and was promoted to director of strategic initiatives in August 2010. In her current role, Naik directs various strategic initiatives that advance the institutional capacity of under-resourced and minority-serving institutions to commit to sustainability and climate neutrality. Before joining Second Nature, Naik worked as project coordinator with Harvard University’s Office for Sustainability. For the past 10 years, she has also worked extensively in India and the U.K. on various sustainability projects. Following her passion for sustainability issues in developing countries, she co-founded a sustainable design company (Artha Studio) in India in 2007 that leverages the field of architectural design to bridge the milieus of environmental justice and the built environment. Naik received her master’s degree in product design, with a focus on sustainable design, from the Birmingham Institute of Art and Design (U.K.) and her bachelor’s degree in interior architecture from the Center for Environmental Planning and Technology (India). 61
  • chapter 2 Finance | Case Study University of Maryland, Baltimore How the University of Maryland, Baltimore reduced peak-hour power consumption by over 30 percent Case Study by Comverge Background “By serving as our curtailment service provider, or In 2006, the State of Maryland passed legislation broker, in the PJM DR programs, Comverge facilitated requiring that energy consumption for all state the reduction of our peak demand and overall buildings be reduced by 5 percent in 2009 and 10 consumption, which ultimately helped reduce our percent in 2010. carbon footprint and emission levels.” Coincidentally, the University of Maryland, Baltimore He explained further: “Comverge provided the (UMB) was already engaged in examining efficiency resources to monitor real-time market pricing, programs to find cost-effective measures to save develop load profiles, and create customer baselines. energy and expenses on its campus. Comverge’s graphical tools have been invaluable to our success in the PJM DR programs.” UMB began working with PJM Interconnection, the regional transmission organization, and Comverge, Inc., Solution a leading provider of clean energy solutions through UMB enrolled in Comverge’s Real-Time Economic demand response (DR). As Michael Krone, PE, CEM utility Load Response and its Reliability Pricing Model (RPM) operations manager for UMB, stated: programs. These programs offered assistance from energy analysts and delivered load profiling and IT support, consumption analytics and graphics, and other conservation initiatives. 62 w w w. c l i m a t e n e u t r a l c a m p u s . c o m “ e are very happy with Comverge’s W support in the PJM DR programs. We found Comverge to be customer-oriented with unique tools that complement our  in-house capabilities.” –  ike Krone, Utilities Operations Manager, M University of Maryland, Baltimore Along with furnishing the graphical tools that enabled UMB’s success in the PJM DR programs, Comverge: • Performs energy audits to identify energy savings • Completes on-site assessments •  Provides metering and system integration and assistance •  Offers 24/7/365 technical and operations support from its Integration and Command Center.
  • >  niversity of Maryland, Baltimore U Strategies Results •  Using an existing 20,000 ton-hour/2,000-ton output thermal storage system to shift air conditioning loads from daytime on-peak operation to nighttime off-peak operation. Comverge worked closely with UMB facilities managers •  Remotely controlling lighting in public areas and turning off all non-essential lighting loads during periods of high demand. •  Switching lighting and HVAC loads in real time via remote control from occupancy sensors and the local building automation system. to offer technical support and up-to-date information on energy market prices and new energy conservation opportunities. UMB has a well-established relationship with Comverge, and recently extended its contract to include DR program support services. UMB is also employing Comverge to participate in the PJM Synchronized Reserve (SR) program. Similar to •  Temporarily raising HVAC return-air set points for 30 minutes or less to reduce cooling demand (since the level of thermal inertia for a building is typically 45 minutes or more, this effort is transparent). •  Placing a portion of chilled water production on a current limiting mode for 30-minute periods (to ensure this activity remains transparent to the building occupants, only a fraction of overall production is in conservation mode at any given time, and the operation shifts between facilities). •  Deploying a Building Automation Network that monitors and controls the individual automation system(s) in each building from a central location. the real-time market and RPM programs, SR programs extend participation hours to evenings and weekends. UMB will further benefit from additional technical support from Comverge’s ICC support group. “ niversity of Maryland, Baltimore U is a great example of what just one campus can do to reduce its energy load and lessen its carbon impact. The university should be commended for its innovation and forward thinking.” –  eorge Hunt, Comverge Senior  G Vice President, Commercial Sales 63
  • chapter 2 Finance | White Paper Going Green—A Rural Regional Perspective During a Period of Diminishing Resources Despite the budget crunch faced by most colleges and universities, sustainable initiatives can be successfully implemented to the benefit of the institution, the students and the community By Robert Gaines, Elizabeth City State University Elizabeth City State University (ECSU) was ECSU is located in the northeastern corner of North founded on March 3, 1891, the date that House Bill Carolina, in Elizabeth City. This area of the state 383 was enacted into law by the North Carolina is extremely rural, with an average income of General Assembly, establishing a normal school $33,000 per household—25 percent lower than for the specific purpose of “teaching and training the statewide average. teachers of the colored race to teach in the common schools of North Carolina.” With a current enrollment of 3,307, the university is excelling in its 64 ECSU’s historical legacy as an education and community leader in the region means the mission to provide outstanding instruction, research institution has a responsibility to use its position and opportunities and community-outreach projects. resources to help this rural, economically repressed w w w. c l i m a t e n e u t r a l c a m p u s . c o m region embrace and develop sustainability initiatives ECSU offers 36 baccalaureate degree programs that will benefit the community, the university and in the basic arts and sciences, and four master’s its students. In pursuing sustainability, ECSU has degree programs in elementary education, biology, also had to address dwindling resources as the mathematics, and school administration. ECSU also state’s budget shortfall continues to mirror the crisis offers a doctor of pharmacy degree in collaboration around the country. The university’s main challenge with the Eshelman School of Pharmacy (the is in maintaining interest in, and a commitment to, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill). the objective of climate neutrality during an era of
  • resource scarcity. Sustainability projects in general, reduce greenhouse gases. This document was not although conceptually worthy, are challenged by inconsistent with the sustainability policy previously extended payback/investment periods, and this is approved by the board. particularly apparent when competing with more immediate fiscal concerns in an atmosphere of With these requirements, ECSU quickly formulated limited resources. a steering committee to provide oversight to all related efforts. The steering committee identified In establishing itself as a committed leader in the academics, technical staff, students and community rural setting of Elizabeth City, ECSU sought to members to serve on the formal sustainability develop partnerships with other entities interested committee. The composition of the panel reflected in the community. This included academics, ECSU’s commitment to not just involve university students and community organizations. In addition, constituents, but also to reach beyond its boundaries ECSU reached out to external entities such as the and assume a leadership role in the community in a Institute for Capacity Building of the UNCF, Second holistic and inclusive manner. Nature, the Environmental Defense Fund, Green Ambassadors, the Association for Advancement After establishing the organizational structure of Sustainability in Higher Education, Association for the sustainability committee, the steering of Physical Plant Administrators and others, for committee began to research possible financial guidance and assistance. resources that would support the implementation and execution of the plan. As mentioned previously, The Board of Trustees of ECSU adopted a state resources were limited. Budgets had to be sustainability policy on March 9, 2010. This policy reduced while attempting to preserve (to the extent established, as a core value, ECSU’s commitment to possible) the academic core. To continue to advance proactively and effectively manage its environmental the implementation of sustainability practices resources—tangibly, water, energy and other while minimizing the use of scarce resources, natural resources. In achieving its commitment to ECSU sought grants, public/private partnerships sustainability, the Board of Trustees recognized the and collaborations with independent sponsors as following strategies for implementation: a) systematic alternative resources. These associations allowed integration of sustainability principles; b) impact ECSU to develop additional sustainable projects that on master planning; c) design and construction impacted the campus, both through administrative/ implications; d) facility operations and maintenance; student-based activities and through community- e) climate-change mitigation and renewable energy; based outreach programs. f) transportation; g) recycling; and h) environmentally preferable purchasing practices. With the endorsement of the sustainability policy by the Board of Trustees, the Chancellor signed the American College & University Presidents’ Climate Commitment. As a signatory to this document, ECSU committed to a series of efforts that would document the university’s progressive commitment to climate neutrality. The major components of this document required that the university initiate the development of a comprehensive plan to achieve climate neutrality and commit to actions to “ CSU’s historical legacy as E an education and community leader in the region means the institution has a responsibility to use its position and resources to help this rural, economically repressed region embrace and develop sustainability initiatives that will benefit the community, the university and its students.” 65
  • chapter 2 Finance | White Paper Academic, administrative and student-based sustainable initiatives Another positive outcome of this partnership was the development of a comprehensive sustainability plan that incorporated the goals for the university Academically, ECSU has incorporated green and and outreach to the community. ECSU’s sustainability sustainable concepts in many science, general mandate incorporates the following: education and health courses. Although a degree 1. Operate in a sustainable manner. in sustainability is not available, students benefit from rich and diverse course offerings that include sustainability concepts as a classroom component of study. Included among the offerings are Specific Topics in General Chemistry, Ethics in Biotechnology, General Botany, General Ecology, Global Geochemical 2.  Engage the student body and faculty members to participate in campus-based sustainability initiatives. 3.  Engage the community in sustainability initiatives with outreach programs. Cycles, Human Nutrition, Conservation Psychology, 4.  Continue to seek funding for sustainability projects. Professional Seminar in Healthcare Management, 5.  Monitor and measure the results of sustainability Hydrology of Coastal Water, and General programs. Environmental Science. Other topics that expose students to sustainable concepts revolve around After a competitive bidding process, ECSU procured green manufacturing, ethical issues in sustainability a contract with Honeywell Corporation to identify and the environment, social responsibility and green energy enhancements in selected buildings on behaviors, energy tax credits, and the impact of the campus with an eye to making the institution more tax codes in the interpretation and formation of social sustainable. These enhancements are guaranteed by and economic policies. In addition, sustainability is Honeywell to save more than $5 million over a 14-year included in coursework as related to environmental period, and will be financed through a commercial liability and green marketing concepts. In the administrative sector, ECSU has engaged in several successful public–private collaborations in an effort to extend the development of sustainability into loan. The loan will be repaid through the guaranteed savings. Once the loan has been repaid, ECSU can use future savings to continue to enhance the campus’s sustainability efforts. the day-to-day activities of the university. One of these partnerships was with the Environmental Defense Fund (EDF). EDF has established itself as a non-profit environmental advocacy group dedicated to issues that include global warming, ecosystem restoration and energy conversation. During the summer of 2010, EDF placed an intern on ECSU’s campus. The purpose 66 of this internship was to identify measurable w w w. c l i m a t e n e u t r a l c a m p u s . c o m energy savings that could be achieved through “ n the administrative sector, I ECSU has engaged in several successful public–private collaborations in an effort to extend the development of sustainability into the day-today activities of the university.” best practices, behavior modifications, and such innovative technologies as the deployment of virtual servers. This project identified savings of approximately $300,000 at an estimated cost to ECSU of $ 59,000 and a payback period of 1.8 years. When implemented, these savings project carbon In general, the following activities comprise the types of projected savings in selected buildings on campus: 1.  Upgrade lighting and controls. dioxide reductions of 190 tons annually and 370,000 2. Implement water conservation. in electrical kilowatt savings. 3. Improve utility load management.
  • 4. Regulate PC power. 5. Install digital dedicated heat recovery chillers. 6. Upgrade heating and cooling digital controls. ECSU was also a recipient of a planning grant from UNCF’s Institute for Capacity Building. This grant enabled the university to continue to train staff on the development of an inventory of campus greenhouse gases, and develop a mitigation plan. “ ur students have brought O to campus renowned green advocates who have reinforced the idea that a sustainable environment is not a class, race or age commitment.” Most recently, ECSU received a grant that will fund an energy manager position at the university. The energy manager will implement the university’s sustainability plan and provide grassroots leadership for the campus’s climate-neutrality activities. Students at ECSU have also been actively involved in researching and establishing sustainable actions. Their campaign is entitled “BE BLUE, GO GREEN.” In addition, two student leaders were identified to participate in the Green For All Fellowship and Academy Program that aims to expand, educate and engage the base of support for climate solutions and a clean-energy economy in America. Green For All Fellows are on-the-ground leaders in the movement to create an inclusive green economy strong enough to lift people out of poverty. Our students have brought to campus renowned green advocates who have reinforced the idea that As stated earlier, this region is rural and poor, a sustainable environment is not a class, race or age and lags in all key demographic and statistical commitment. Other upcoming student-sponsored benchmarks for the state. Therefore, ECSU believes events include “Community Week” celebrations, and the installation of water drums to collect rainwater to irrigate the grounds. An energy conservation contest is planned for spring 2011 among the various residents in campus-based housing. The students’ plan, as a final activity for the current academic it must—as an anchoring academic institution in the region—provide leadership in the area of sustainability, green awareness and job creation. 67 ECSU’s Center for Green Research and Evaluation received an Innovation Grant in the amount of $400,000 from the NC Rural Center. This grant year, is to begin a community garden in which to served 21 counties in ECSU’s catchment area grow organic vegetables. (estimated population of 640,000). The goal of this project was to increase the number of businesses Outreach into the community producing or providing green-related goods and ECSU is committed to expanding the region’s services, as well as workers employed in green knowledge of and expertise in sustainability. industries. In addition, the grant went toward
  • chapter 2 Finance | White Paper expanding consumer awareness of green concepts North Carolina. Its vision for sustainability, however, and the importance of sustainability in everyday life. is enormous, constantly evolving, and reflects the stalwart commitment of the board of trustees to ECSU was also successful in attracting other energy the university, students and the community, along grants for the local catchment area. These grants with its mandate—during a period of diminishing constituted an important link in the community resources—to ensure that sustainability ideology development programs. Other grants that were becomes intertwined in the everyday execution of funded by outside resources helped to improve both the university’s and the community’s missions. energy efficiency in community residences, further demonstrating ECSU’s commitment to the community. In summary, ECSU is a relatively small institution located in the most rural northeast quadrant of “ CSU is committed to expanding E the region’s knowledge of and expertise in sustainability.” About the Author 68 w w w. c l i m a t e n e u t r a l c a m p u s . c o m Robert Gaines has a bachelor’s degree in accounting from North Carolina Agricultural & Technical State University, and an MBA from the University of Wisconsin–Madison. He is a certified public accountant. Gaines’ prior experience in higher education includes serving as the director of auxiliary services, assistant controller and vice chancellor for business and finance. Currently, in his role as special assistant to the chancellor of ECSU, he is responsible for design and construction, capital projects, facilities, and enrollment management (which includes admissions, registrar’s office, financial aid and retention), sustainability and other special projects.
  • chapter 2 Finance | Case Study Environmental Defense Fund Helps Campuses Save Energy and Money—and Protect Human Health Improving energy efficiency is a simple strategy for reducing costs and has the added benefit of helping to create more sustainable campuses Case Study by Marilynn Marsh-Robinson, Environmental Defense Fund In today’s struggling economy, universities are looking for multiple ways to save money. Not many realize, however, how easily they can save money while protecting human health. Two years ago, North Carolina Central University joined hands with Environmental Defense Fund (EDF) to study how the campus could increase energy efficiency and stretch budget dollars. Two fellows from EDF Climate Corps Public Sector spent the summer examining campus energy use. What they found was stunning: they reported that the Durham, NC, campus could cut energy costs by more than $2.6 million annually —a dramatic 64 percent reduction. What’s more, the EDF fellows identified how the university could recover its upfront energy investment in only two years. 70 w w w. c l i m a t e n e u t r a l c a m p u s . c o m EDF Climate Corps Public Sector helps universities identify cost-effective energy improvements, in just 10–12 weeks. In summer 2011, EDF fellows —specially trained MBA and graduate students —will work with minority-serving institutions in Georgia, North Carolina, Texas and Washington, DC. “For young people looking to change the world not tomorrow but right now, EDF provides a remarkable opportunity,” says Michael Regan, EDF’s energyefficiency director. In its first two years, EDF Climate Corps Public Sector has delivered impressive results. In the summers of 2009 and 2010, fellows identified projects that have the ability to achieve several objectives: • Reduce energy use by 46 percent. • Save $15 million in energy costs in five years. •  Cut 54 million kilowatt hours of electricity per year —enough to power 5,000 homes. •  Reduce 30,000 metric tons of greenhouse gas emissions per year, the equivalent of taking 5,000 SUVs off the road. How does it work? EDF recruits graduate students from top business, policy, environmental and engineering schools across the country and puts them through rigorous training in energy-efficiency technologies, energy pricing and financial modeling. EDF then places fellows at carefully selected institutions for the summer. EDF works closely with the host organizations to tailor the fellows’ work plan to the institution’s needs, while providing ongoing technical assistance and support. EDF also pays the fellows’ salaries. “For young people looking to ‘ change the world not tomorrow but right now, EDF provides a remarkable opportunity,’ says Michael Regan, EDF’s energyefficiency director.”
  • In return, host organizations agree to provide senior-level support, access to energy-use data and a day-to-day supervisor. Host organizations must be committed to reducing their energy use and implementing recommendations, where feasible. EDF also checks in with hosts after the fellowship period to discuss implementing the proposed efficiency projects. Training and commitment distinguish EDF fellows as they work to fulfill several mandates: •  Inventory the host’s energy use through professional energy audits, interviews with key employees and direct observation. •  Model the financial impact of upgrades to lighting, office equipment, and heating and cooling systems, factoring in available rebates and incentives. •  Facilitate collaboration among energy-efficiency stakeholders. •  Map out a clear strategy and recommendations for energy-efficiency investments. “ n summer 2011, EDF placed I fellows in Asheville (NC), Raleigh (NC), Atlanta (GA), the City of New York Housing Authority, and the Eastern Band of the Cherokee Nation, among others.” EDF Climate Corps Public Sector Hosts • Bennett College* • Clark Atlanta University* • Elizabeth City State University • Fayetteville State University* • Howard University* • Johnson C. Smith University • Morehouse College* • Morehouse School of Medicine* In addition to universities, EDF Climate Corps Public Sector works with municipalities and houses of worship. In summer 2011, EDF placed fellows in Asheville (NC), Raleigh (NC), Atlanta (GA), the City of New York Housing Authority, and the Eastern Band of the Cherokee Nation, among others. • North Carolina A & T State University* EDF Climate Corps Public Sector is an offshoot of EDF Climate Corps that began in 2007 to place top-tier MBA students in the nation’s leading companies. The program’s rapid success in the corporate world led EDF to expand its work to the public sector. • University of Texas at Brownsville* • North Carolina Central University • Paul Quinn College • Pembroke University* • Shaw University* • Spelman College* • University of Texas at El Paso* • Winston–Salem State University* * 2011 hosts By participating in EDF Climate Corps Public Sector, universities receive a blueprint that identifies shortterm and long-term strategies to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, and EDF shows them how to use immediate savings to pay for energy-efficiency upgrades needed on campus. Improving energy efficiency is not as easy as flipping a switch —nor is it extremely difficult. University leaders are using EDF Climate Corps Public Sector to help their institutions become more sustainable while training the environmental leaders of the future. Contact EDF Climate Corps Public Sector at www.edfclimatecorps.org/public or Marilynn Marsh-Robinson at mmrobinson@edf.org. 71 About the Author Marilynn Marsh-Robinson manages EDF’s partnerships with public and private minorityserving institutions.
  • chapter 2 Finance | Case Study Xavier University Partners With Siemens for Ten-Year Energy Performance Contract Siemens’ work under the performance contract dramatically cut Xavier University’s utility use and expenses and created a healthier indoor air quality, leading to easier and less costly maintenance for utilities and a better learning environment for students Case Study by Curtis Brown, Siemens Industry, Inc. Originally founded by Saint Katharine Drexel and University also needed to improve some other areas: the Sisters of the Blessed Sacrament in 1915 as a high • Indoor air quality in campus buildings school, today Xavier University is a private institution and the country’s only Catholic historically black college and university. Learning happens on the campus’s 27 acres in approximately 20 buildings, totaling more than 3 million square feet of space. In August 2005, when Hurricane Katrina hit the Gulf Coast, toxic floodwaters inundated Xavier University. When New Orleans’ levees were breached, the university ended up with 12 feet of water on campus and was forced to close its doors for the fall 2005 semester. As a result of Hurricane Katrina, maintenance that had been deferred for years was addressed, and the university began thinking more seriously about increasing its operating efficiency. To truly reduce the campus’s energy consumption and bring old systems 72 up to date, the university would turn to its long-time w w w. c l i m a t e n e u t r a l c a m p u s . c o m trusted partner, the Building Technologies division of Siemens Industry, Inc. • Water conservation efforts • Efficiency of lighting systems •  Chilled water plant capacity, efficiency and operations • Building and occupant comfort To achieve these facility improvements, the university decided to enter into a performance contract by partnering with an energy services company (ESCO). This would be the first performance contract in Xavier University’s more than 90-year history. Performance contracting would prove advantageous to the university for a number of reasons. First and foremost, the university could complete a large volume of work all at once, instead of making the improvements over many years as part of a long-term capital improvement program. Second, Xavier University could begin reaping the energy savings immediately. Hiring an ESCO would also free the university from the labor-intensive project-management Customer objectives duties required for an improvement program of Many of the university’s buildings had aging, this magnitude. While the university’s facilities inefficient, unreliable and operationally intensive team concentrated skills, effort and time on several infrastructure—a situation the university needed to capital construction projects, a trusted ESCO address along with rising energy and operational costs, would be diligently completing numerous other university growth, and minor budget cuts. Xavier facility improvement measures on campus.
  • Performance Contracting Defined Performance contracting is a means of financing a multifaceted capital improvement project. An energy services company (ESCO) identifies facility improvement measures (FIMs) that will reduce water, sewage, electricity, steam, and natural gas usage, and guarantees the predicted savings. The ESCO provides single-source accountability, acting as project manager, executing the work, and/or hiring local contractors. The contractee obtains a loan to pay for the improvements. The cost of the project is divided by the guaranteed annual savings to determine the length of the contract. Project payment is based on the guaranteed annual savings. Once the project is implemented, the savings that result from increased efficiencies are used to make loan payments to the capital leasing company. If the actual savings are in excess of the guaranteed savings, the contractee keeps the amount above the guarantee. If lower, the ESCO must pay the contractee the difference. Beyond the term of the contract, the contractee receives the entire energy savings. Siemens solutions the 2,400-ton capacity of its central chilled water Following a comprehensive, competitive Request for plant that serves more than 14 campus buildings. Proposal (RFP) process, Xavier University selected Siemens as its ESCO. The school has been a Siemens The cornerstone of the chilled water system customer since 1980, and, after 30 years of working optimization was Demand Flow™, a proven Siemens together, the two enjoy a solid relationship and patent-pending technology that optimizes central foundation of trust. chilled water systems to reduce the plant’s total energy consumption by 20 to 50 percent. To begin the performance contracting process, Siemens’ energy engineers performed an investment- Physical upgrades, repairs and additional mechanical grade energy audit of the campus facilities, installations have also been implemented, including identifying approximately 40 different facility new variable-frequency drives (VFDs) on all chilled improvement measures (FIMs). Xavier University water pumps, chilled water temperature and flow chose five types of projects for the ten-year sensors, and two-way chilled water control valves on performance contract: air-handling units. Lighting upgrades 73 Approximately 70 occupancy sensors were installed to discontinue the practice of lighting unused rooms and help to reduce electricity usage in campus buildings. Additionally, the lighting in 21 facilities was upgraded from inefficient technology to energysaving lamps, fixtures and ballasts. Chilled water system optimization With just one chiller functional after Hurricane Katrina, the university turned to Siemens to optimize “ hile the university’s facilities W team concentrated skills, effort and time on several capital construction projects, a trusted ESCO would be diligently completing numerous other facility improvement measures on campus.”
  • chapter 2 Finance | Case Study Energy management and control systems Siemens enhanced the APOGEE® Building Automation System to perform time-of-day scheduling, enabling Xavier University to start and stop HVAC equipment at specific times rather than letting it run 24 hours. Time-of-day scheduling improves the energy efficiency of the HVAC equipment, and gives Xavier University greater control over building systems. Siemens also implemented Demand Control while finding its facilities easier and less costly to maintain. In addition to these benefits, Siemens estimates the FIMs will generate the following annual energy savings: • kWh: 3.88 million • gas: 437 ccf • domestic hot water: 16,000 therms • water: 3.6 million gallons Ventilation (DCV) to provide an optimal level of outside air ventilation based upon room occupancy and CO2 discharge. Because the university is located in the Deep South, the DCV solution helps improve indoor air quality and comfort by overcoming heat and humidity issues. Mechanical system improvements Xavier University’s mechanical systems have been streamlined to reduce dependency on utilities. These improvements include the re-insulation of chilled water, dual temperature, and hot water piping; the addition of six new motorized valves to the dualtemperature piping entrance; and air distribution modifications. These solutions will combine to help reduce the university’s utility costs while improving building and occupant comfort. “ ur main goal is to provide O education to young people.  If the environment is uncomfortable, it distracts  them from learning. The goal is to give them a safe, healthy, comfortable environment so  they can concentrate on  making the grade.” –  heppard Roubion, S Director of Building Services, Xavier University Water conservation Water conservation projects included replacing wallmounted and floor-mounted toilets with low-waterusage devices, and installing aerators on lavatory faucets that reduce flow yet still provide the service needed to wash hands. In kitchen areas, pedal valves were installed on wash sinks. 74 w w w. c l i m a t e n e u t r a l c a m p u s . c o m Siemens implemented these water conservation projects in 26 buildings to help reduce the more than 22 million gallons used annually by the university. Customer results The work performed under the performance contract will dramatically cut Xavier University’s utility expenses, and has already created a healthier indoor air quality. Today, the university uses less energy “ here are a number of people T around campus who cannot tell you how much we’ve actually done because [Siemens has] worked nights, weekends and off-times. Our customers are going along with their day-today activities not knowing that we have a major undertaking that’s happening right underneath them. To me,  that’s worth its weight in gold.” –  arion Bracy, Vice President, M Facilities Planning & Management, Xavier University
  • These savings will have an impact on Xavier University’s carbon emissions as well, representing the equivalent of 130 acres of forest saved, 97 railcars of coal not burned, and 3,385 cars taken off the road for one year. Executing some of the projects proved challenging however. Several of the campus’s older buildings required work to be performed in such a way as to preserve the historic integrity of the facilities. Additionally, the work had to be undertaken in as least The performance contract between Siemens and Xavier University has been a resounding success. Facilities are now easier to operate and more efficient, and they provide a better learning environment for students. To view references and sources please visit www.climateneutralcampus.com disruptive a manner as possible, so finding times that would cause minimal disturbance was critical. About the Author Curtis Brown is Siemens’ account executive for the HBCU market, responsible for the sales and successful implementation of energy performance contracts, including planning, communication and coordination of resources to ensure a successful partnership. In addition to his partnership with Xavier University, Brown has helped Florida A&M University, Winston–Salem State University and Florida Memorial University with similar energy performance contracts. Brown has more than 17 years of experience in construction management and energy services. He holds a B.S. in management information systems from Bowling Green State University, and is a member of Kappa Alpha Psi. 75
  • Chapter Facilities Minority-serving colleges and universities around the United States are increasingly showing their commitment to sustainability by greening their campus buildings, grounds and operations. More than one-fifth of the 52 minority-serving institutions that responded to UNCF’s The Minority-Serving Institutions Green Report: 2010 Campus Sustainability Survey  had included sustainability components in their master or strategic plans. These institutions and others are implementing sustainability initiatives that include LEEDcertified buildings, and improving energyefficiency, water conservation and recycling programs. Such initiatives also serve as educational opportunities that engage students and the surrounding community in creating a culture of sustainability. 77
  • chapter 3 FacilitieS | White Paper Greening from the Inside-Out: How Sustainability Can Transform Your Campus  Achieving green schools for everyone is possible with an integrated approach to planning and implementing sustainability initiatives By Jaime Van Mourik, Center for Green Schools at the U.S. Green Building Council When the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC) launched the Center for Green Schools in fall 2010, we established a vision to achieve green schools for everyone within this generation. The Center is increasing USGBC’s efforts to drive change in how campuses and schools are designed, constructed and operated so that all educational facilities can enhance student learning experiences. 78 w w w. c l i m a t e n e u t r a l c a m p u s . c o m Colleges and universities already have a higher percentage of LEED-certified green space than any other sector, including government, retail and hospitality, with an average of one LEED-certified building for every four colleges in the United States. While we applaud this leadership, higher education institutions have only just begun to scratch the surface of transforming their aging campuses; today, there are more than 83,000 college buildings— comprising 3.48 billion square feet on campuses across the country—of which only about 4,300 are LEED-certified or -registered. “ y scaling up training and B outreach with under-resourced institutions, stakeholders from across these campus communities can build the capacity and expertise they need to green their campuses and leave a lasting legacy of sustainability for future generations.” As we begin to address existing facilities on campuses, the Center for Green Schools is particularly focused on supporting green building efforts at under-resourced schools, including minority-serving institutions and community
  • “ inority-serving institutions M can benefit from using LEED as a tool for integrating sustainability into all aspects of campus operations, and to improve overall performance in buildings.” colleges. By scaling up training and outreach with under-resourced institutions, stakeholders from across these campus communities can build the capacity and expertise they need to green their campuses and leave a lasting legacy of sustainability for future generations. According to The MinorityServing Institutions Green Report: 2010 Campus Sustainability Survey released by UNCF’s Institute for Capacity Building, more than one-fifth of the 52 minority-serving institutions that responded to the survey had included sustainability components (such as a green building policy) in their master or strategic plans. With the understanding that green communities are about more than just bricks and mortar, senior administrators, deans and faculty are creating new learning experiences and facilitating higher levels of community engagement. Students are also taking on a larger role, asking to be part of the greening of their campuses, and facilities staff and faculty are working together to provide experiential learning opportunities for their students. Minority-serving institutions can benefit from using LEED as a tool for integrating sustainability into all aspects of campus operations, and to improve overall performance in buildings. To enhance and support institutional efforts to finance green building projects, USGBC collaborated with the Energy Services Coalition to create the Paid-from-Savings Guide to Green Existing Buildings, a publication providing detailed information on how to leverage the cost savings from improved building performance to fund more comprehensive green building retrofits. The guide outlines many ways to save money, such as expanding a typical Energy Savings Performance Contract to include more holistic green improvements, and achieve LEED for Existing Buildings: O&M certification in the process. Spelman College, an all-women’s, historically black college in the heart of Atlanta, Georgia, has made a decision to become an institution that leads by example to prepare its students for jobs that address 21st-century problems around sustainability. On the operations side, Spelman committed to integrating sustainable building practices into a new residence hall as part of its 2000–2015 comprehensive campus plan. These dorms, known as The Suites, became the first LEED-certified residence hall at a historically black college or university and demonstrated to Spelman’s students what it means to live sustainably. Since the certification of The Suites in 2009, Spelman has signed the American College & University Presidents’ Climate Commitment and is looking at strategies to enhance the performance of its existing buildings on campus as a component of its plan to reach carbon neutrality. Buildings as a catalyst for change The LEED green building certification program offers a framework for developing and evolving campuswide sustainability plans. LEED provides guidance throughout a building’s life cycle. The LEED for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance (O&M) rating system offers the greatest potential to guide the development and implementation of campus sustainability plans. Its emphasis on upgrading building systems to improve energy efficiency, implementing operations and maintenance best practices, coordinating purchasing, and establishing alternative transportation plans makes many of the credits applicable to campus-wide initiatives. “ he built environment offers a T powerful context for learning, and buildings provide an active and tangible place for students to process what they may be learning from a textbook.” 79
  • chapter 3 FacilitieS | White Paper Buildings as a teaching tool certification efforts. The guide outlines three options The built environment offers a powerful context for engaging students: course work, internships and for learning, and buildings provide an active and volunteer opportunities. It details the benefits of tangible place for students to process what they involving students and outlines ways to initiate the may be learning from a textbook. With the average process of developing an engagement program, such person spending 90 percent of his or her time as planning considerations and LEED-related tasks indoors, students, faculty members and visitors alike that students can perform. The guide also contains need to understand how the spaces they inhabit profiles of three campuses that are engaging students affect their lives. with great success. In the fall of 2010, Grainger, a supplier of Buildings as a part of the community maintenance, repair and operating products, partnered with the honors program at the Howard University School of Business in Washington, DC, to offer a green building course. The partnership was beneficial to both the students and the supplier, and showcased the benefits of education around green building. Grainger’s recruiting efforts were enhanced due to the School of Business offering a degree in supply-chain management, such that students were given the opportunity to interact with experts in the field. The students worked on a project to assess the operations and maintenance on campus to make recommendations for energy reduction, efficiency gains, and cost savings for one of Howard University’s facilities. As a way to help connect students to campus green building projects, the Center for Green Schools released a free, online publication called Hands-on LEED: Guiding College Student Engagement. This publication focuses exclusively on the role of students, and explains how they can be involved in green building projects and contribute to LEED 80 w w w. c l i m a t e n e u t r a l c a m p u s . c o m “ ommunity participation in the C integrated process of designing, developing and implementing sustainability projects on campus proves just how important coalition-building, collaboration and teamwork are in the transformation process.” The use of many campus facilities extends beyond students, faculty and staff into the local community. Community participation in the integrated process of designing, developing and implementing sustainability projects on campus proves just how important coalition-building, collaboration and teamwork are in the transformation process. As part of a one-year green building educational internship program, the Los Angeles Community College District (LACCD) sets a great example for community engagement. Students are paired with local USGBC LA Chapter members and receive mentoring and green building education that they take back to LACCD to work on LEED projects. Upon completion of the program, students are selected to work on LEED projects, helping to increase capacity within the college system. LACCD already has eight LEED-certified projects, with an additional 88 projects that are registered and pursuing certification across its nine campuses, making it one of the largest green building programs in higher education. The Center for Green Schools’ Roadmap to a Green Campus is a resource that presents strategies for engaging community members along every step of the journey to a sustainable campus. Using LEED as a framework for developing and evolving campus-wide sustainability plans and implementing practical and measurable green campus solutions, the resource was created with the support of the Association for the Advancement of Sustainability in Higher Education, and references more than 100 tools and resources to support campus greening efforts, as well as institutional success stories from across the country.
  • Vision for the future Colleges and universities are USGBC’s allies in the green building movement, and we expect to see continued results and innovation as institutions address existing building needs with carbon reductions in mind. The campus stories shared are only a few examples of the great work being done at minority-serving institutions. By continuing an integrated approach to planning and implementing sustainability initiatives, we can achieve green schools for everyone within this generation. About the Author Jaime Van Mourik is a leader for colleges and universities going green, offering institutions guidance through the green building planning and implementation process, and advising on how the LEED Green Building Rating System® can act as a framework for shaping sustainability initiatives. In her role with the Center for Green Schools at the U.S. Green Building Council, she directs the development of tools and resources for the higher education sector, maintains customer relations, and presents on the benefits of a sustainable campus to a range of audiences. Van Mourik also oversaw the development of the Center for Green Schools’ latest and most comprehensive higher education strategy guide, Roadmap to a Green Campus. 81
  • chapter 3 FacilitieS | Case Study Water Reclamation and Reuse: Extending the Life Cycle of Water Innovative sanitary water treatment facilities will help colleges and universities reach their campus climate-neutrality goals Case Study by Daniel Allison and Peter Varga, Organica Water, Inc. Background: rapid development leads to water stress in China After almost 30 years of double-digit economic Foxconn Electronics, Inc., one of the largest growth and the migration of hundreds of millions electronics manufacturers in the world, operates its of villagers to cities, many places in China are Longhua Industrial Park in the heart of Shenzhen. struggling to meet an expanding demand for Employing more than 200,000 workers, this water. Shenzhen, a hyper-industrialized city in manufacturing community has significant demand the Guangdong province, is a prime example. As in many growing regions, rapid urbanization is starting to strain existing water supplies and sanitary infrastructure. The sanitation problem is for water and lacks sufficient sanitary treatment. In 2008, the government mandated that Foxconn address sanitary water problems within the park to help relieve stress on the central treatment plant. With no option, Foxconn abided. However, one further exacerbated by heavy pollution and frequent formidable problem existed: siting a wastewater flooding that threaten the very economic vitality of treatment plant in a densely developed community. the region. Fearing stagnate economic growth, the Chinese government has begun coordinating new policies for developing wastewater infrastructure Meeting water needs at Longhua Industrial Park projects throughout the country. With limited sanitary treatment options, Foxconn turned to Organica Water, Inc. to provide a 82 w w w. c l i m a t e n e u t r a l c a m p u s . c o m “ he company’s innovative design T features a lush greenhouse that uses the first systematic application of reactor-based, complex adaptive ecosystems. This breakthrough technology has enabled Organica to change the look and feel of water treatment altogether.” manageable solution for its industrial park. Working in municipal wastewater treatment for nearly 15 years, Organica has designed more than 30 treatment facilities across Europe. The company’s innovative design features a lush greenhouse that uses the first systematic application of reactor-based, complex adaptive ecosystems. This breakthrough technology has enabled Organica to change the look and feel of water treatment altogether.
  • pleasing, odorless design allow the facility to be located within a dense urban environment. In “ eyond meeting the community’s B sanitary water needs, the greenhouse provides a lush, verdant space as an alternative to the drab, industrial atmosphere within the park.” addition, Organica’s hyper-efficient technology and ability to provide an alternative supply of clean water for the community makes their treatment facility the most sustainable solution. Commissioned in August 2010, the facility at Longhua Industrial Park became Organica’s second decentralized treatment plant in Shenzhen. This plant, a mere 15,000 square feet in size, has a hydraulic capacity of 800,000 gallons per day that serves approximately 17,000 people in the community. The treatment facility is designed to produce clean, reusable water onsite for multiple non-potable applications such as toilet flushing, >  rganica’s greenhouse water treatment facility at Longhua O Industrial Park after commissioning irrigation, cooling water and industrial process water. Beyond meeting the community’s sanitary Implications abroad water needs, the greenhouse provides a lush, The problems experienced in Shenzhen with verdant space as an alternative to the drab, regard to water supply and sanitation are typical industrial atmosphere within the park. As with all of many places around the world. In fact, the Organica facilities, this plant utilizes a unique Fed United Nations estimates that 1.4 billion to 2.1 Batch Reactor (FBR) technology. This process relies billion people currently live in severely water- on interconnected, sequentially operated biological stressed regions. Unfortunately, the United States reactors with lush vegetation growing on top. The is not exempt from these problems. As a company treatment process is completely odorless, and dedicated to sustainable water solutions, Organica involves circulating water through both aerobic sees decentralized, on-site water recycling as the and anaerobic chambers in which suspended answer to many water-related problems worldwide. plant roots serve as a natural habitat for a unique Water recycling serves to decrease potable water ecosystem that is specially designed to break intake, saving money and energy. It also provides down waste. In addition to its sustainable design, multiple social and environmental benefits, such as Organica’s patented FBR process is designed to reducing watershed pollution, providing a local and be 15–30 percent more efficient than conventional dependable water supply, and decreasing the load on technologies. These efficiencies include lower central treatment plants. energy requirements and less sludge production, at a greatly reduced footprint. Having proven its flexibility in the dense urban environment of Shenzhen, it is clear that Organica’s In the end, Organica was the only logical choice treatment facility could be sited virtually anywhere. for Foxconn. Its small footprint and aesthetically With many sizing options, this technology can treat 83
  • chapter 3 FacilitieS | Case Study within a community. water on both large and small scales. Because of this flexibility, bulk consumers of water—such as universities—can now reuse water on-site for multiple applications. Some of these uses include make-up water for cooling towers and boilers, irrigating lawns, and even flushing toilets. As ushers of sustainability, universities are in an especially “ s ushers of sustainability, A universities are in an especially unique position to employ water reclamation and reuse  on campus.” unique position to employ water reclamation and reuse on campus. The benefits go beyond cost savings to becoming a beacon of sustainability About the Authors 84 w w w. c l i m a t e n e u t r a l c a m p u s . c o m Daniel Allison is a graduate of Virginia Tech, and is currently pursuing his master’s degree in environmental planning at Virginia Commonwealth University’s Wilder School of Government and Public Affairs. He is also an associate in the marketing division of Organica Water, Inc. Allison’s area of expertise is campus water management planning, and advancement of sustainability with regard to water. Peter Varga has more than 15 years of professional experience in the water resources industry. He is the environmental and technology specialist for Organica, and assists in the development of technical marketing materials and outreach to potential partners and clients, as well as managing other business development-related issues. Varga holds a master’s degree in environmental science and policy from Clark University.
  • Energy. Efficiency. Expertise. Think Globally and Save Locally. ConEdison Solutions is reinventing energy for the members of ACUPCC. Energy Savings Performance Contracting Renewable Energy Energy-efficient Equipment Upgrades Sustainable Design/Build Services How many slices of the pie do you need? Whether you want to: Reduce your energy costs and energy consumption;  Upgrade your building infrastructure without capital outlays;  Reduce your carbon footprint;  Manage your energy supply costs to your budget;  All of the above. ConEdison Solutions can serve all of the energy needs of your campus! Call: 1-888-210-8899 www.conedisonsolutions.com ConEdison Solutions is proud to be a participant in the American College and University Presidents Climate Commitment
  • chapter 3 FacilitieS | White Paper HVAC Risk Analysis Can Improve Performance and Reduce Costs Emerging technologies and critical systems audits are helping cash-strapped colleges and universities address HVAC challenges and meet energy-efficiency goals By Bill Harris, Trane A prolonged recession and the weakest job market in a generation have sent Americans scurrying for the classroom. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, close to 40 percent of young adults aged 18 to 24 are now pursuing postsecondary studies; that is the highest percentage ever. Millions of their older siblings and parents are joining them on campus looking to change careers, learn new skills and 86 become more employable. w w w. c l i m a t e n e u t r a l c a m p u s . c o m As a result, many colleges, universities and community colleges find themselves strapped for space. Most are strapped for cash, too. Rising energy “ dministrators and facility A managers recognize the impact that substandard conditions can have on the health and performance of students, faculty and staff. Dozens of studies have found links between student performance and such indoor environmental factors as temperature, air flow, humidity and lighting.” and maintenance costs, falling tax revenues, state and local budget problems, a soft economy and Complicating matters is the fact that campus several other factors are putting the squeeze on infrastructure is showing its age. Most buildings are school budgets and forcing administrators to make three decades old—or older—and are badly in need tough decisions. of repairs and renovations. In Virginia, for example,
  • half of the college buildings were built 50 or more years ago and are reported to need at least $1 billion collectively in repairs and improvements. Other states face similar challenges. Campuses address overcrowding and aging infrastructure No wonder the Association of Physical Plant “ n HVAC critical system audit A (CSA) is a good starting point for facility managers looking to set priorities and address HVAC challenges and opportunities  one by one.” Administrators (APPA), a leading group of education facilities managers, reports that half of the colleges and universities nationwide are in the process of updating their master plans to address overcrowding and update facilities. More than 43 percent of renovations will include work on the school’s heating, ventilating and air conditioning (HVAC) systems. This tracks with a General Accounting Office report that says 25 percent of American students attend schools that are “dangerous or below standard,” and that almost two-thirds of schools have building features (such as HVAC systems) that need extensive repairs or replacement. Administrators and facility managers recognize the impact that substandard conditions can have on the health and performance of students, faculty and staff. Dozens of studies have found links between student performance and such indoor environmental factors as temperature, air flow, humidity and lighting. In addition, the APPA found Critical systems audit helps facilities chiefs set priorities An HVAC critical system audit (CSA) is a good starting point for facility managers looking to set priorities and address HVAC challenges and opportunities one by one. A CSA helps managers to better understand how energy is being used— and probably wasted—on their campuses. The audit provides a thorough inspection of the HVAC system and its components to identify reliability and efficiency problems. Conducting a CSA usually pays for itself many times over in energy savings, as well as improvements in reliability, maintenance and staff utilization. Automated systems can lead a facilities department through a self-audit, but many facility managers find it makes better sense to bring in an independent engineer or energy service company (ESCO) to help perform their CSA. a direct relationship between a campus’s physical environment and its ability to attract, retain and satisfy the best students, faculty and staff. In these tough economic times, however, few educational institutions have the resources to address all of their HVAC needs at once. On average, colleges and universities cut their maintenance and operations expenditures by 10 percent in 2009, according to the annual College Maintenance and Operations Cost Study conducted by School & University. As a result, many schools are already well behind the curve, having been forced to perform only the most critical repairs needed to keep their HVAC systems up and running in recent years. “ he University of Central T Missouri collected and studied three years’ worth of utility bills, analyzed 12 months of operations and maintenance data, and used energymodeling software in a CSA that eventually yielded 265 energyconservation opportunities.” 87
  • chapter 3 FacilitieS | White Paper data, including energy usage and maintenance New technologies improve audit results records. The automatic reporting and tracking Game-changing technologies are making system features available on many web-enabled building audits even more revealing for facilities departments. automation systems are ideal for this purpose. These include automated HVAC fault detection and Interviews with maintenance personnel and building diagnostics (FDD) that detect and report significant occupants can also provide useful information about faults in air handlers, chillers, boilers, cooling towers A CSA usually starts with gathering all available system performance. Auditors then conduct a thorough inspection during which they test chillers, boilers, cooling towers, circulation pumps, air handlers and other HVAC equipment to observe whether there are any maintenance problems or performance deficiencies. and other critical HVAC components. FDD applications provide early warning of potential equipment problems, helping the facilities department to set priorities and better manage preventive maintenance programs in order to avoid system failures. The New Buildings Institute projects that the use of FDD can yield annual energy and service contract savings of at With this information, auditors summarize how least 10 cents per square foot, and perhaps as much well the system is operating, what maintenance as $1, in a typical facility. activities need to be performed and at what cost, the current and projected reliability of the system, and Many ESCOs offer “intelligent services” that include anticipated longevity. Facilities managers can use the the use of such emerging technologies as predictive report to validate the need for system improvements, modeling. By using sophisticated algorithms that develop maintenance and repair budgets, and set compare the operating characteristics of a particular department priorities. The University of Central Missouri collected and studied three years’ worth of utility bills, analyzed 12 months of operations and maintenance data, and used energy-modeling software in a CSA that eventually yielded 265 energy-conservation opportunities. The audit provided justification for improvements that generated a 32 percent reduction in utility costs and greenhouse gas emissions. The university made funded improvements by reallocating funds from other accounts, and, with a $36 million performance contract, paid for upgrades with future energy savings. 88 system to benchmark data from many similar systems, specialists are able to look deep inside HVAC components, uncover potential problems, and predict sooner when components will fail (and with greater accuracy than ever before). The American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) estimates that colleges and universities can find ways to reduce energy costs in a typical campus building by 30 percent when they conduct an audit that benchmarks their energy use against that of comparable buildings. While designing a new dance complex, Point Park University in Pittsburgh benchmarked leading dance w w w. c l i m a t e n e u t r a l c a m p u s . c o m “ y conducting regular critical B system audits, facility managers can improve their ability to set HVAC repair, maintenance and overhaul priorities, and reduce energy waste on campus.” studios throughout the country to identify ways to create a comfortable, energy-efficient indoor environment for performers, faculty and audience members. As a result, systems selected for the complex are expected to use 36 percent less energy than ASHRAE standards for buildings of this type.
  • By conducting regular critical system audits, facility managers can improve their ability to set HVAC repair, maintenance and overhaul priorities, and reduce energy waste on campus. More importantly, they increase their impact on the institution’s ability to create a quality, high-performance learning environment in which students, faculty and staff can do their best work and achieve their full potential. “ he American Society of T Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) estimates that colleges and universities can find ways to reduce energy costs in a typical campus building by 30 percent when they conduct an audit that benchmarks their energy use against that of comparable buildings.” About the Author Bill Harris serves as vice president of education markets for Trane. Harris is responsible for leading and executing the strategic objectives for education vertical markets. Formerly serving as district manager in Connecticut, he has been with Trane since 2000, holding various roles with increasing responsibility. Harris received an electronic engineering degree from Pennco Technical Institute and is an active member of his community. He is an emeritus director of the Connecticut Business and Industry Association Board and the vice chair of Northwest Catholic High School’s board. Trane, a business of Ingersoll Rand, provides safe, comfortable and efficient building solutions with a differentiating portfolio of offerings to help colleges and universities meet their sustainability and environmental goals in a fiscally sensible manner. For more information, visit trane.com/highereducation. 89
  • chapter 3 FacilitieS | White Paper Intelligent Energy Management Intelligent energy management offers a new class of solutions to complex energy problems while meeting today’s market demands and shapes the future White Paper by Comverge Today’s energy problems As energy costs and demands rise and more renewable energy sources become available, the existing energy infrastructure struggles to keep pace. The aging electricity grid does not efficiently balance supply and demand, resulting in needless waste, expense, threats of blackouts and brownouts, and carbon dioxide emissions. they can also provide a solid foundation on which to build tomorrow’s smarter energy infrastructure. This paper will detail the need for intelligent energy management technologies and services, as well as the benefits they bring to utilities, C+I (commercial and industrial), and residential energy consumers. Drivers for change 90 w w w. c l i m a t e n e u t r a l c a m p u s . c o m While the development of a real-time, proactive and intelligent grid (or smart grid as it is widely known) promises to solve energy problems in the longterm, consumers and businesses need effective and affordable solutions today for managing their energy consumption and costs. Intelligent energy management technologies can provide these immediate solutions. Properly implemented, intelligent energy management can not only help cut energy use, spending, and emissions, The following issues drive the need for intelligent energy management solutions. Peak demand challenges Energy use changes from one hour to the next depending on many influencing factors, like outside temperatures. Because energy needs can change abruptly, the energy infrastructure must always have the capability of meeting the highest —or peak —demand. Although the nation’s energy use reaches peak demand levels for fewer than 100 hours every
  • year, we maintain inefficient, pollution-causing “peaker” plants for use on these rare occasions. Aging infrastructure Technologies developed more than 100 years ago inform the current power grid’s structure, yet the grid delivers power to countless contemporary digital devices. The antiquated infrastructure shows signs of stress. Outages and problems with power quality cost U.S. businesses $100 billion-plus each year, “ onsumers will bear a 50 percent C increase in electricity prices over the next seven years, according  to projections, because of increased consumption of fossil fuels and climate change initiatives that make carbonbased fuels more expensive.” and three major blackouts have occurred in the past decade. Brownouts across the grid affect more and more people on a regular basis. Already, it will cost an estimated $1.5 trillion to bring the U.S. grid up to date during the next 20 years. Upgrading the grid will only cost more the longer it is left in its current state. Rising prices Consumers will bear a 50 percent increase in electricity prices over the next seven years, according to projections, because of increased consumption of fossil fuels and climate change initiatives that make carbon-based fuels more expensive. Rising demand Since 1982, the nation’s increased demand for electricity has outpaced the grid’s transmission capacity by 25 percent annually. Over the next 20 years, overall electricity demand is expected to rise by an additional 30 percent. Legislative impact While the U.S. has yet to enact federal carbon regulations or pricing laws, other government regulations affect future energy supply strategies. In Pennsylvania, for example, a new law requires a 4.5 percent reduction in peak energy demand by 2013. The coming age of plug-in vehicles Plug-in hybrid and all-electric cars, like the Nissan LEAF and Chevy Volt, promise to help reduce both carbon emissions and dependence on imported oil; however, they also increase demands on power plants and transmission lines. Existing solutions to the energy problem In the past, demand-response technologies helped shave peak energy demand using one-way communications from suppliers to customers and reactive measures that responded to demand spikes. These first-generation solutions had limitations: They could not predict changes in demand, nor could they provide everyday energy management solutions. Newer, informed demand-response technologies help shape energy demand, predict available load, and then precisely shape that load. In particular, informed demand response enables distributed intelligence end-points, verifiable results, accountability and measurement, and comprehensive data analysis. Despite these advances, significant barriers to energy management remain. Customers still lack the avenue for two-way communication with energy providers that would enable them to use the data they receive to proactively manage their energy use. Increased use of renewable energy By 2015, U.S. stimulus spending promises to support an additional 50,000 megawatts of renewable energy sources. These types of energy present intermittency challenges: The wind does not always blow, and the sun does not always shine. As a result of intermittency, energy management systems must incorporate rapidly accessible response reserves for use during power shortages. The case for intelligent energy management Intelligent energy management solutions build on traditional and informed demand-response practices by incorporating several new elements that help energy providers and consumers leverage a true, two-way dialogue that is lacking today. Perhaps most importantly, intelligent energy management provides 91
  • chapter 3 FacilitieS | White Paper a platform that empowers real-time insight, analysis and control, as well as integration with the expanding smart-grid infrastructure. In particular, intelligent energy management: •  Leverages the emerging two-way, real-time communication between utilities and customers to provide enhanced services —Intelligent energy management technologies empower intelligent end-points that provide real-time tracking and management of energy consumption. Whether communicating through displays or smart “ ntelligent energy management I solutions build on traditional and informed demand-response practices by incorporating several new elements that help energy providers and consumers leverage a true, two-way dialogue that is lacking today.” thermostats, intelligent energy management enables utilities to increase opt-in rates for energy- creates risk that energy demand will exceed supply, efficiency programs while enabling the user to take participating customers receive an activation notice a more active role in their energy consumption. to switch off non-essential lighting or turn to a •  Enables better energy control —Two-way communication technologies allow homeowners and C+I users to set operation times for energyusing devices and incorporate automatic temperature adjustments or price signal responses. The same technology also enables utilities to schedule energy cycling to better manage demand across the grid. •  Provides insight into problem areas needing improvement —Intelligent energy managementenabled sensors gather data on energy use so customers can analyze their consumption habits and identify ways to improve efficiency, resulting in significant cost savings. •  Makes energy loads more predictable—Using radio signal-based digital control of air-conditioners, hot-water heaters, pool pumps and other devices, utilities can help avoid energy load peaks. Utilities can send control commands to appliances when 92 they need to shed their energy load, and send w w w. c l i m a t e n e u t r a l c a m p u s . c o m follow-up commands when it is safe to return those devices to previous levels of energy use. •  Allows for rapid and flexible responses to changing conditions —C+I customers can earn cash incentives by agreeing to use conservation measures when peak demand across the grid becomes dangerously high. For instance, when extremely hot weather backup generator to reduce their organization’s energy footprint. •  Automates energy management —Intelligent energy management technologies can integrate into existing building automation systems to find new ways to manage demand. For example, intelligent energy management can program building temperatures to drift within a range rather than stay at a specific reading, thereby reducing both power consumption and cost without noticeably affecting comfort or operations. •  Enables quicker, easier service changes —Utilities can establish or disconnect service to homes or businesses using wireless communication, eliminating the need for on-site visits. •  Improves management across the grid —Intelligent energy management devices can help utilities control capacitor banks across their distribution networks. The technology can work with other demand-response systems to switch banks on or off as needed to maintain an effective power grid. •  Bridges to the promise of the smart grid —Through a direct interface with residential or C+I users, utilities can support renewable energy programs and make adjustments to meet customers’ everdeveloping energy needs.
  • The requirements of intelligent energy management •  Control events Deliver notifications and alerts of impending Intelligent energy management solutions must events (such as the need to execute a demand- support the following six core business processes response program during times of peak use), vital to delivering and supporting any comprehensive enable dynamic pricing programs, manage energy management program: acquire, manage, in-home devices, and maintain grid operations control, measure, analyze and optimize. The delivery and upgrades. of energy management programs is complex, comprising many moving pieces and various stakeholders across a utility organization. No technology today delivers comprehensive support from customer attainment to program optimization. •  easure results M Determine event performance after it has been executed, provide metrics on device usage and effectiveness, forecast futures based on past event Intelligent energy management provides customers participation, and ensure ongoing performance of with a single platform and dashboard to: device and system operations. •  Acquire new customers Research potential customer prospects, segment and market to them based on their likelihood of participation, and provide ongoing updates on new features, developments, etc. •  Manage operations Provide support for call-center operations, deliver customer support, handle work orders and job completion, administer customer billing, and advise on the impact of rates and tariffs. •  nalyze trends A Leverage metrics to determine overall system and network performance, viability of pre determined customer segments, and customer opt-in rates. •  ptimize programs O Enhance programs through dynamic forecasting and performance modeling, address potential constraints on the grid, and account for the impact of harsh weather conditions. 93
  • chapter 3 FacilitieS | White Paper The components of intelligent energy management In addition to providing solutions in support of the above business processes, a comprehensive intelligent energy management suite empowers the following components: •  Work management capabilities Enables vital facets of energy management programs related to customer attainment and delivery of services. •  Enhanced demand-response applications Predicts the energy load available in a system, as well as helping to shape demand. •  Analytics and forecasting applications Helps customers understand their energy consumption patterns and make informed decisions about their usage habits. •  Grid optimization applications Supports the emerging complexities being added to the grid, including electric vehicle charging, variable pricing, and support for renewable energy resources. 94 In providing these applications, intelligent energy management solutions will address the peak demand problems facing the grid today while paving the way to the future. Going forward, intelligent energy management will also serve as the operating environment that empowers nextgeneration applications coming onto the grid. These applications, while not necessarily prominent today, are on the roadmap and any energy management solution needs to be able to support the increased complexities they will bring. Evaluation criteria For a utility or C+I customer considering an intelligent energy management solution, several key criteria should be considered. To be truly intelligent and deliver the best results and returns on investment, intelligent energy management technologies should provide: •  Support for open standards A technology based on open standards offers greater flexibility and support for a wide range of applications. An open standards-based technology also makes it easier to add future service and product upgrades. w w w. c l i m a t e n e u t r a l c a m p u s . c o m
  • “ he delivery of energy T management programs is complex, comprising many moving pieces and various stakeholders across a utility organization.” •  bility to measure and verify results A Any insights into energy use and demands should be presented in clearly measurable ways. And that data should be easy to verify and validate in order to ensure the measurements being collected are the measurements you want and need. •  nsights and analysis I While data are helpful, intelligent energy management technologies should also help you understand the implications of those data in an intuitive format of some kind. •  Accessibility and portability While a user-friendly meter is helpful for managing energy use, the ability to also enable data analysis and control through a variety of end-points — web-based portal, in-home display, smart or thermostat, etc. —is critical. The more easily you can manage your energy consumption, the greater control you’ll gain over usage and costs. •  Control and automation Finally, the technology you choose should provide a variety of ways to act on the insights and analysis you gain to both reduce your energy consumption and make that process as easy as possible. This should include, for example, automated options for taking advantage of lower off-peak electricity prices. Within any given utility environment, there are multiple groups and functions responsible for implementing technologies that help meet energyefficiency mandates. Therefore, any intelligent energy management solution must also address the needs of multiple stakeholders within a utility, including demand side, customer care, grid operations and supply-side SOU. An offering can be considered complete only when it offers solutions to these audiences but also takes into account the business process the key stakeholders in these utility business units must adhere to. For instance, the needs of systems operators, IT, marketing and AMI deployment teams are all different, but must be met with a single, integrated solution. For example, a utility company’s marketing department will benefit from an intelligent energy management solution that enables it to identify the customers most likely to be interested in a new service, while the firm’s technicians will want an intelligent energy management offering that provides automated alerts for outages and other problems. The customer support team, meanwhile, will need a system that delivers detailed usage information for each account, along with automated trouble ticketing and real-time work order tracking. Therefore, when evaluating an intelligent energy management solution, utility companies must also pay close attention to its ability to meet the requirements of the various utility stakeholders. The same is true for C+I users, where multiple stakeholders have a vested interest in energyefficiency efforts. A steel mill operator looking to reduce energy costs, for instance, will want an intelligent energy management offering that can not only generate the desired savings, but can also deliver the validation and data that compliance officers need to provide to regulatory agencies, create detailed billing statements for accounting, and integrate services across multiple buildings for facilities managers. A truly intelligent energy management system that delivers the best results and returns on investment should offer certain features: •  Support for open standards Technology based on open standards offers support for a wide range of applications as well as the flexibility to easily add future service and product upgrades. •  Ability to measure and verify results An energy management platform should present clearly measurable insights into energy use and demand. It should enable customers to easily verify 95
  • chapter 3 FacilitieS | White Paper “ n providing these applications, I intelligent energy management solutions will address the peak demand problems facing the grid today while paving the way to the future.” and validate measurements to ensure they are receiving the data they need. •  nsights and analysis I While data are helpful, intelligent energy management technologies should also intuitively format the data to help the customer understand the implications of the information. •  ccessibility and portability A A system that incorporates a variety of data portals—web access, in-home display, smart meter, thermostat—better enables control of energy usage and cost management. •  Control and automation The data generated by the intelligent energy management technology should drive a variety of easy approaches to reducing energy consumption. For example, a system should offer customers automated options for taking advantage of lower off-peak electricity prices. 96 w w w. c l i m a t e n e u t r a l c a m p u s . c o m •  integrated platform An For both utility and C+I customers, an intelligent energy management solution must address the needs of multiple stakeholders. Within the utility, it must support those employees concerned with demand, supply, grid operations, customer care, and business operations to ensure the utility works cohesively and efficiently for its customers. The same is true for C+I, where multiple stakeholders have a vested interested in energyefficiency efforts. Looking ahead: The future market for intelligent energy management In coming years, government legislation will open a global market for intelligent energy management. Lawmakers around the world continually adopt new regulations to improve energy efficiency, cut carbon dioxide emissions and reduce dependence on imported fossil fuels. In the U.S., the federal government has directed billions of dollars toward the development of clean and efficient energy. According to politicians, rebuilding the economy and remaining globally competitive depends in part on investing in renewable energy sources and efficiency measures. The European Union has focused on smart meters as a way to help reduce carbon dioxide emissions and meet climate change goals. The European continent strives to have 80 percent of all households equipped with smart electricity meters by 2020, while the United Kingdom has set its goal at 100 percent of households. Developing economies such as China, India and Brazil will also depend on developments in intelligent energy management. Their burgeoning middle classes are straining their energy infrastructures as millions of new customers acquire refrigerators, air conditioners, televisions, home computers and other energyhungry appliances. Large organizations such as Cisco, IBM, Siemens and GE all see huge growth potential in the market for intelligent energy management and smart-grid offerings. They are all pursuing partnerships and investing in new products and services with an eye toward establishing a solid foothold in that market. IBM, for example, is pursuing a global “Smarter Planet” strategy that will require “green infrastructures that are instrumented, interconnected, and enabled by intelligent energy management.” It works with numerous business and government organizations to help implement such systems around the world, and is currently working on 150 smart grid-enabling projects in both developed and developing countries. Cisco, meanwhile, expects the market for smart-grid communications infrastructure alone to reach $20 billion per year over the next five years. Company executives say they believe that smart-energy networks could eventually grow to be “100 or 1,000 times larger than the Internet.” GTM Research sees the smart-grid market for the U.S. alone growing to $9.6 billion a year by 2015. The largest segment of that market, it predicts, will be distribution
  • automation, followed by advanced metering infrastructure, smart utility enterprise and homearea networks. “This new power scenario has placed the onus on utilities to integrate smart-grid technology to cope with load management and next-gen obstacles such as ‘green blackouts,’” according to GTM Research. All combined, these developments will contribute to an ongoing and global demand for intelligent energy management technologies and services in the years to come. “ n coming years, government I legislation will open a global market for intelligent energy management. Lawmakers around the world continually adopt new regulations to improve energy efficiency, cut carbon dioxide emissions and reduce dependence on imported fossil fuels.” Summary With pressures on the electricity grid compounding, but a fully “smart” solution still many years off, intelligent energy management products, software, and services can help now with reducing energy use and improving energy-efficiency by offering several improvements: •  Two-way, real-time communication between utilities and customers for service alerts, consumption management and more. •  Greater control over home and C+I energy use through intelligent end-points that customers can manage remotely. •  Intelligent sensors that provide data on energy use so customers can easily identify areas in which they can reduce consumption and costs. •  More predictable energy loads through smart control of electronic appliances. •  Automated energy management that works with existing building systems to manage demand and shed load. •  Quicker, easier service changes via two-way, wireless communication. •  More efficient distribution networks across the grid. •  Support for smart-grid applications such as timeof-use pricing, electric vehicle charging, and renewable energy sources. Put into place properly, these intelligent energy management solutions can bridge the gap from today’s inefficient electricity system to tomorrow’s smart, automated, fast-responding grid, while also reducing the increased complexities of managing this type of advanced system. •  Faster response to changing conditions, with cash incentives to encourage conservation measures. 97
  • chapter 3 FacilitieS | White Paper Universities: Leaders of the Sustainability Movement Organica’s BlueHouse™ offers colleges and universities a decentralized water-treatment system that can treat the water onsite for reuse, and affords higher education students a living, learning laboratory By Melissa McDonald, Organica Water, Inc. Campus sustainability has increased in importance research, operations and outreach at colleges and to college and university policymakers over the universities (UNESCO, 1990). Today, more than 600 last 20 years as the full impact of the activities and college and university presidents have signed the operations of these institutions on the environment American College & University Presidents’ Climate becomes clearer. At the same time, pressure Commitment (ACUPCC). The ACUPCC’s mission from government environmental protection accelerates progress toward climate neutrality and agencies, sustainability movements and university stakeholders—including the student body—has intensified the issue (Alshuwaikhat & Abubakar, 98 2008). Some universities have already put signatures w w w. c l i m a t e n e u t r a l c a m p u s . c o m on sustainability commitments, declared green building initiatives, and improved environmental stewardship or environmental protection, all in a bid to achieve campus sustainability. The first green movement was born when over 300 university administrators signed the Talloires Declaration (1990), an action plan for incorporating sustainability and environmental literacy in teaching, “ t is imperative for colleges I and universities to embrace sustainability initiatives given that campuses across the nation grow continually, and as such their environmental, economic and social impacts on the surrounding communities expand.”
  • sustainability by empowering the higher education sector to educate students, create solutions, and provide leadership for the rest of society (ACUPCC, 2010). In addition to signed commitments, certain campuses require new building structures to be certified by Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED), a system that promotes the design of energy-efficient buildings, decreased production of waste materials, and reduced energy consumption. “ large amount of energy is A expended to extract, treat, supply and use water, meaning that water-oriented strategies can result in significant reductions  in energy use and greenhouse gas emissions.” It is imperative for colleges and universities to embrace sustainability initiatives given that campuses consumption pattern is irrational, illustrated by the across the nation grow continually, and as such their use of precious potable water for toilets, cooling environmental, economic and social impacts on towers and lawn irrigation. the surrounding communities expand. Universities are nurturing grounds for future thinkers and The treatment of water and energy initiatives in leaders, and have a significant influence on society sustainability movements ignores that the two are through environmental actions taken today—along critically and inextricably linked. A large amount of with the values, motivation, ideas and skills they energy is expended to extract, treat, supply and use inspire in students. Universities must integrate what water, meaning that water-oriented strategies can they advocate with what is being taught in their result in significant reductions in energy use and classrooms and carried out on their campuses. greenhouse gas emissions. It must also be considered that water-related energy use in the United States Water: The missing link in the sustainability equation Research done at Organica finds that campuses focus mainly on energy-use reduction. However, noticeably missing in the sustainability equation is the importance of water. comprises up to 13 percent of the nation’s total electricity consumption. Moreover, the adoption of more intensive watertreatment standards at the state and federal levels will increase the energy and carbon costs of treating our water and wastewater, exacerbating the problem. Less than 1 percent of the world’s water is available Clearly, addressing our water issues not only helps for drinking, and, with pollution contaminating this to solve the growing water crisis, but also addresses supply and given the effects of climate change, it energy issues. follows that available water supplies will be become far less reliable. Furthermore, population growth and Water and the university continued urbanization will increase the demand for Fresh water must be managed at both the water, compounding the stress on local resources. institutional and community levels in the most efficient manner possible. As a bulk consumer of Despite this unsustainable practice, water in the water for a variety of functions—such as showering United States is typically underpriced and often and cleaning, food preparation, landscaping, subsidized. Conventional politics generally hold laboratory experiments, steam generation and it beyond the reach of laissez-faire economics, cooling purposes—campuses put significant pressure hiding water’s true cost. Ironically, this protection, on a community’s water resources. coupled with the average American lifestyle, leads to extravagant water consumption that continues The bad news is that this large level of consumption to outstrip population growth. Reinforced by carries significant economic, social and dated policies and infrastructure, much of this environmental costs. Overconsumption not only 99
  • chapter 3 FacilitieS | White Paper affects the campus financially, but also contributes to stress on local drinking water supplies, an expanded carbon footprint, and the degradation of natural ecosystems and habitats. This not only affects the local community, but the regional watershed as well. The good news is that colleges and universities, as large, multi-function institutions with a high level of autonomy and cross-disciplinary cooperation, are often extremely well placed to adopt the creative measures needed to turn such problems into solutions for the future. Off the grid and out of the box: BlueHouse wastewater-treatment and reuse systems With the severely constrained resource situation vis-à-vis growing demand, the irrational use of potable water for non-potable uses, and water rates rising across the country, one would think that water reuse would be much more ubiquitous than is currently the case. The problem is that consumption patterns are highly dependent on municipal infrastructure that simply does not support water reuse. Municipal wastewater treatment infrastructure conventionally consists of large municipal sewers piping sewage away from the population to the periphery of the city where a few large, concrete, malodorous plants treat the water to a standard sufficient only to release it into the nearest water body. Laying a separate set of piping across the city to bring the treated water back to be consumed is clearly not feasible. But a solution exists off the grid, in the form of decentralized water-treatment systems that can treat the water onsite for reuse. 100 w w w. c l i m a t e n e u t r a l c a m p u s . c o m Such a solution has been conserving water for businesses and municipalities in Europe and Asia for the last two decades. The revolutionary Organica™ Technology is now in the United States, adapted specifically for college campuses and light commercial uses. The approach embodies a completely new and highly progressive technological and social philosophy by integrating wastewater treatment into the urban fabric in striking, natural spaces. The technology represents the first systematic application of reactor-based complex adaptive ecosystems in the wastewater treatment field, combining the latest developments in ecological and wastewater “ he revolutionary Organica™ T Technology is now in the United States, adapted specifically for college campuses and light commercial uses. The approach embodies a completely new and highly progressive technological and social philosophy by integrating wastewater treatment into the urban fabric in striking, natural spaces.” engineering. In addition to the bacteria found in traditional activated sludge systems, thousands of species of plants, animals and microbes populate Organica treatment plants. This diversity results in a very stable and resilient system that maximizes the biological degradation of contaminants, ultimately producing a higher quality of water that can then be reused. The result is an odorless, noiseless, compact, botanical garden with a zero-discharge design that is easily integrated into any urban environment. Recently, two Organica projects have been implemented in France based mainly on size and environmental improvements; the plants have also been chosen because of the added benefits to education. In the town of Le Lude, France, the Organica wastewater treatment plant is located very close to the town’s residential areas. The council chose Organica not only due to operating costs and footprint, but also because the treatment plant can be utilized as a living, learning, laboratory, thus adding educational benefits for the nearby schools. The other treatment plant, in Vert le Grand, France, was chosen based on the educational factor as well as the opportunity to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. The BlueHouse™ The model developed for campuses is called an Organica BlueHouse™—a compact 1,400-square-foot structure that can process up to 90,000 gallons per day. The complete system—from reclamation to reuse—fits inside a greenhouse, providing a space for passive enjoyment in a garden-like setting.
  • The BlueHouse™ system recycles and saves 18 million gallons of water per year by safely reusing treated wastewater for cooling tower and boiler makeup, irrigation and flushing. It offers an immediate operational savings, transforming the campus through a cross-sector collaboration of economic and environmental sustainability. Investment opportunities also exist for university endowment funds seeking meaningful social, environmental and economic impacts. Much like the plants based in France, the BlueHouse™ will offer higher education students a living, learning laboratory. Students of engineering and the sciences will be able to use the greenhouse toward developing solutions for cities of the future. The BlueHouse™ is a chance to enable higher education institutions not only to help conserve our most valuable and increasingly scarce natural resource, but also to fulfill their role as it relates to the surrounding community by lessening the burden on freshwater use. Through the implementation of the BlueHouse™, the campus can fulfill its commitment to sustainability. Sustainability is equal parts planet, profit and people. The BlueHouse™ can lower the economic burden of campuses, improve water quality, and reduce pressure on community water resources. For colleges to truly be “Green,” they must first “Go Blue.” 101 About the Author Melissa McDonald holds a master’s degree in urban and regional planning from Virginia Commonwealth University. Her background mixes business, planning, and a passion for sustainability practices and initiatives. McDonald’s expertise is a core component of the marketing division at Organica Water, Inc., and she remains passionate about creating awareness for the future of water.
  • chapter 3 FacilitieS | Case Study University of Central Missouri Trane upgrades guarantee more than $735,000 in annual savings Case Study by Trane In the spring of 2009, the University of Central Missouri (UCM) embarked on a $36.1 million energy savings contract (ESCO) with Trane. The ESCO addressed $20 million in needed but deferred maintenance, and $16.1 million in energy-efficient upgrades on the campus. Construction was scheduled to last through the spring of 2011, but the project was completed in the fall of 2010, six months ahead of schedule. By June of 2010, 100 percent of the lighting retrofits were complete and the geothermal heating/ cooling system was fully operational. These projects have already generated $500,000 in energy and operating cost savings before project completion. 102 w w w. c l i m a t e n e u t r a l c a m p u s . c o m “ o less important to UCM’s goals N is the fact that a 2008 Princeton Review survey showed that 63 percent of college applicants are looking for a green campus. And, according to the ‘Greening America’s Schools’ report, test scores improve by as much as 5 percent among students in a high-performance classroom.” >  he University of Central Missouri offers 150 study programs T on a beautiful campus serving more than 11,000 graduate and undergraduate students from 40 states and more than 50 countries. Founded as a teacher’s college in 1871, UCM has maintained a commitment to excellent teaching. UCM has 437 full-time faculty members, 68 percent with a PhD or other terminal degree. The student-to-faculty ratio is 17:1 and the average undergraduate class has 22 students. UCM’s six-month job placement rate for undergrads is 94 percent. Graduating students also benefit from one of the lowest student debt ratios in the state. (Photos courtesy of UCM Photo Services.)
  • Challenge The University of Central Missouri campus was facing approximately $20 million in priority deferred maintenance costs—with an annual budget of only $2 million available. “Some of the equipment and facilities on campus hadn’t been touched in anywhere from 20 to 80 years,” said Dr. Betty Roberts, UCM Vice President for Administration and Finance. “Some of the equipment was so old we were forced to stockpile spare parts. We had a 10-year plan, but with only $2 million annually we could never catch up. Complaints from students and faculty were rampant! “We started talking to various ESCOs (energy service companies) about our problems, but their solutions were what I called ‘bleeding edge’—not ‘leading edge.’” “We were spending so much money on reactive emergency projects—a generator went out or a boiler went out—and I began to assess how much cost, how much labor was being put into those efforts. We had not received any funding from the state for capital appropriations in at least 10 years. So it was: how do I make a change for the benefit of the institution—the students, the faculty, the staff—and create a positive learning environment with no money?” No less important to UCM’s goals is the fact that a 2008 Princeton Review survey showed that 63 percent of college applicants are looking for a green campus. And, according to the “Greening America’s Schools” report, test scores improve by as much as 5 percent among students in a high-performance classroom. Solution >  he $36.1 million ESCO at the University of Central Missouri T will save 31 percent in energy costs and is designed for USGBC LEED Silver certification, progressing to Gold certification. (UCM Photo Services) initiate an ESCO performance contract project, Dr. Roberts began the effort to upgrade the campus. The supplier selection process was open to Missouri state prequalified ESCOs to submit a proposal. Trane representatives inspected every building and system on campus to develop a solid, all-encompassing proposal for UCM. The Trane proposal included the following: •  Installation of 150 geothermal wells for highefficiency heating and cooling of three main buildings on the UCM campus •  Energy conservation measures, including new windows and roofs on some buildings Dr. Roberts adds, “I realized that the status quo would simply perpetuate the issues. Then I was introduced to Chad Remboldt, Education Consultant at Trane in Kansas City. He started talking about our issues, instead of ongoing repairs.” •  Installation of high-efficiency lighting throughout the campus In addition to student and faculty complaints, impetus for a campus-wide systems upgrade came from the fact that UCM was a signatory to the American College & University Presidents’ Climate Commitment. With that and the support of the UCM President and the Board of Governors, plus organizations like Second Nature and the Clinton Climate Initiative, and a Missouri State statute that allowed UCM to •  Improved air handling systems and acoustical improvements •  Replacement of the outdated, unsightly power plant and boiler system with a green, sustainable geothermal heat pump system • Laboratory air systems and controls • Life safety measures •  campus-wide building automation system to A effectively manage energy use. An innovative feature of the Trane package includes 103
  • chapter 3 FacilitieS | Case Study “green screens” throughout the campus to educate the faculty, students and the community on the university’s sustainability initiatives—and learn what they can do to make a difference and get involved in efforts toward becoming a carbon-neutral campus. Results Dr. Roberts said of the decision to select Trane as the ESCO, “Trane went the extra mile and truly evaluated all of the opportunities. Their proposal was one of the most thorough responses I’ve ever seen. But I knew that the project would be challenged and so we had three outside engineering firms study and validate the Trane proposal.” Dr. Roberts also submitted the proposal for an investment grade audit. UCM now has a sustainable, high-performance campus and will see $735,000 in annualized consumption savings, $848,000 in operating and maintenance savings, and $1.5 million in avoided annual capital improvements. Dr. Roberts said, “This project has more than exceeded my expectations. Trane brought together phenomenal subcontractors who were very accommodating and worked around classes and campus events. Even when there were issues outside the scope of the performance contract, those were addressed. I recently took the Board of Governors for a tour of the campus, and I must say there was very much a sense of happiness over the results of this project. It is very easy to see where the money went. We’re very happy!” 104 w w w. c l i m a t e n e u t r a l c a m p u s . c o m Trane is providing a 15-year select maintenance agreement for the heat pumps that includes seasonal inspections and maintenance to ensure proper, efficient operation and covers parts and labor for repairs to maintainable components over the life of the performance contract. A Trane controls service agreement includes monthly system reports to UCM, semi-monthly system reviews, remote inspections and diagnostics, software updates and staff training. UCM operators will regularly interact with Trane automation specialists for continued controls proficiency training. UCM has the option to continue this service after the first year of operation. Along with the green upgrades, UCM students and faculty made Earth Day 2010 a week-long celebration. Events with the theme “Change your behavior, change our world!” included establishing a nature trail and removing a pile of debris and trash from the surrounding areas. Dr. John Hess, UCM professor >  50 geothermal wells were installed under a parking lot 1 to provide high-efficiency heating and cooling using the earth’s own renewable heat as an energy source. (UCM Photo Services) emeritus of biology and earth science, delivered a speech and led a discussion titled “It’s All Around Us.” Other events included the “Haute Trash Fashion Show,” where students, faculty and staff modeled clothing made of recycled materials, plus lectures, films, a green luncheon, and a keynote address by actor and environmental activist Ed Begley Jr. Dr. Steven Boone, UCM interim Dean of the College of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences and chair of the Earth Day planning committee, said, “Trane’s commitment to education and green initiatives has been above and beyond what we could have expected, and we sincerely appreciate them for all they have done and will continue to do.” Key UCM upgrades •  Energy-efficient HVAC systems and geothermal heating/cooling •  Energy-efficient lighting •  Improved indoor air quality and air handling systems • Classroom and office acoustical improvements •  Campus building automation and life safety systems •  Green” touch screens to educate students and “ community on UCM sustainability initiatives •  New roofs and windows on selected buildings.
  • Kyoto Publishing supports the educational mission of organizations through the creation of thought-leadership reports, and branded business titles. Kyoto Publishing has deep experience in: •  Building relationships with sustainability leaders from government, NGO and business communities • Synthesizing engaging content to communicate complex messages •  Leveraging relationships to target, engage, and communicate to diverse audiences • All aspects of print and online publishing • Lead generation campaigns • Custom publishing • White paper and case study creation To find out more about how your organization can benefit from expanding the communication of your message on sustainability, contact us today. Kyoto Publishing 1.604.688.6221 Suite L200 560 Beatty Street Vancouver, BC Canada, V6B 2L3 www.kyotopublishing.com KYOTO Publishing
  • chapter 3 FacilitieS | White Paper CyberONE: A Sustainable and Catalyst Solution for Higher Education Today The CyberONE studio at the Los Angeles Trade-Technical College is driving awareness of the built environment’s importance in creating a sustainable, equitable society By Marcela Oliva, Los Angeles Community College District Why do we need to rethink our environments? People need places in which to live, work and play; efficient systems for energy, water and land. It is important to understand that ensuring that buildings, campuses, and cities save energy, use recycled they need places to learn, worship, meet, govern, shop and eat. These places may be private or public, indoors or outdoors, rooms, buildings or complexes. Together, they make up neighborhoods, towns, suburbs and cities. Architecture and environmental design professionals are trained in both the art and 106 the science of creating such spaces: They take these w w w. c l i m a t e n e u t r a l c a m p u s . c o m basic and universal needs, create innovative designs and then transform them into reality. The “built environment” is a social mechanism that stimulates the sensory system, affecting the intellect and the desire to create using spatial languages and computer technologies. In addition to the current budget crisis, current needs demand that educational facilities use the most “ n addition to the current budget I crisis, current needs demand that educational facilities use the most efficient systems for energy, water and land. It is important to understand that ensuring that buildings, campuses, and cities save energy, use recycled materials, purchase renewable products, and harvest rainwater is only one step toward a sustainable living environment.”
  • materials, purchase renewable products, and harvest rainwater is only one step toward a sustainable living environment. STAR Community Index™ (a pioneering strategic planning and performance management corporation) has pointed out that sustainable solutions must address interconnected economic, environmental and social concerns. Current solutions do not focus on multiple variables, do not transform, do not self-organize, and do not sustain. “ his is the natural evolution T for education—an integrated approach via physical and immersive environments that connects local talent to national resources to solve local needs and compete globally.” Today’s mechanical reductive approach to life inhibits the growth and well-being of our nation. Current sustainability and environmental movements have tendencies that are specialized, and as a result social equity is frequently ignored or not understood. A sustainable society would empower all members to create and invent through education, move through transportation, be protected through shelter, live healthy lives through access to medical resources and life standards, transform space through architecture, and become civilized through policy and legal systems. A socially equitable sustainable system would allow present and future humans to lead healthy lives, have their basic needs met with fair and equitable access to the Earth’s resources while preserving the biologically diverse ecosystems on which all depend. This is a system based on abundance and creation instead of scarcity and consumption. There is an urgency to implement a new type of holistic environment, one that self-organizes through a loop and acts as a unit. It is time for our nation to develop such a system for managing the built environment, providing agile educational solutions Sphere of knowledge For the last 100 years, knowledge has been kept hermetically sealed within one sphere. The solution requires that all of these spheres become interdependent. The solution requires an integrated approach, but due to the mechanical age mentality, society has become accustomed to segmented and reductionist thinking, leading to isolated and shortterm solutions with endless unrelated boundaries. It is easy to conclude that a new comprehensive solution using all the spheres of knowledge is required. It is in the relationship among all the spheres of knowledge where the balance can be found. These spheres include natural systems, the built environment, economic forces, social drivers, and innovative education. To contribute to humankind’s true wellbeing, integration and interdependence among various spheres of knowledge regarding space are necessary. This is the natural evolution for education— an integrated approach via physical and immersive environments that connects local talent to national resources to solve local needs and compete globally. for all, using our natural resources efficiently, using The power of design business enterprise solutions, and considering all The Los Angeles Trade-Technical College (LATTC) these variables at the same time. Architecture Program provides innovative templates to create spaces, objects, and solutions for local What is blocking this transformation? Some of the practices that inhibit an integrated approach are a failure to tap local talent due to false filters; a failure to use geospatial information when spatial decisions are made; solutions that use only one sphere of knowledge; not acting as a network; and not understanding the power of space and design. needs—with cutting-edge innovation in particular demand in the Los Angeles area—as well as the global market. We recognize the untapped talent of visual thinkers in our communities and we provide them with a nurturing environment, in which learning can happen in the context of doing. We believe our neighborhoods can be empowered to document, design, build and maintain their own places. 107
  • chapter 3 FacilitieS | White Paper The LATTC Architecture Program has demonstrated that through a system of participation, holistic understanding, and nature pattern templates, students can generate unprecedented design solutions accessible to all. Current efforts demonstrate the importance of design for future generations. The LATTC CyberONE geospatial studio is a distributed data and information technology asset “ yberONE is a catalyst C for current educational environments and transformations for our neighborhoods. It is a new  place for learning, innovating, and manufacturing to meet local needs.” under distributed ownership and management of the U.S. National Spatial Data Infrastructure (NSDI), which is a foundation for next-generation industries and technologies. The NSDI 2.0 is based on two established public information networks—the NSDI and the National Environmental Information Exchange Network (NEIEN). The existing NSDI is an information network solely intended to share geospatial information. As defined by the Federal Geographic Data Committee (FGDC), the United States NSDI includes the technology, policies, criteria, standards and people to promote geospatial information sharing throughout all levels of government and the private and nonprofit sectors. The Information Technology & Innovation Foundation (ITIF) indicates that for every $1 billion in funds spent on such infrastructure, more than 30,000 jobs are created. ITIF studies also indicate that investments in infrastructure at an early stage of development, such as a national spatial data infrastructure, will create even more jobs because new jobs are generated by upstream investments in industries responsible for new and innovative applications and services that take advantage of the more robust IT network. 108 w w w. c l i m a t e n e u t r a l c a m p u s . c o m “ he LATTC Architecture T Program has demonstrated that through a system of participation, holistic understanding, and nature pattern templates, students can generate unprecedented design solutions accessible to all.” CyberONE is aware of the importance of the built environment and its place in society. A revolution in architecture and environmental design has taken place. New tools—GIS, CAD, Rapid Prototype, BIM, and 3-D Modeling—have facilitated an unprecedented analytical and comprehensive means of looking at human-made ecosystems. With these new lenses, we are able to see patterns and relationships that we could not see before. These new tools hold the promise of helping us live sustainably in our communities and globally. While some of these tools have been used successfully in design and construction for many years, they now support a broad range of additional applications, such as First Response, National Intelligence, Operations Planning, Emergency Management, and the Americans with Disabilities Act, safety, space utilization, and neighborhood planning. CyberONE is a catalyst for current educational environments and transformations for our neighborhoods. It is a new place for learning, innovating and manufacturing to meet local needs. CyberONE trains the local talent and virtually connects them to NASA scientists, experts throughout the nation, and experts from around the world. CyberONE solutions are individualized, customized and formed by local needs. Using the CyberONE integrated curriculum, innovative spaces for learning, nature templates and universal principles, the community can design and digitally fabricate urgently needed storefronts, greenhouses, energy strategies, eco-centers, recyclable objects, fences, food gardens, pocket parks, mobile health clinics, business incubators, food gardens, mobile health clinics and other spaces.
  • About the Author Marcela Oliva is a professor of architecture and Environmental Design and has been teaching at the Los Angeles Trade-Technical College for more than 8 years. She serves as a team member of the NASA Knowledge Architecture team. Additionally, she has partnered with the LAUSD High School Interesting Students Exploring Excellence (iSEE) program. Their efforts have facilitated the first and largest high school initiative, offering transfer courses in the architecture and engineering field to accredited programs.  Professor Oliva’s students are currently modeling building envelopes as a living organism, exploring “green design retrofit” for cargo containers, and visualizing urban design strategies in real time using: smart mapping, smart tools, nature’s patterns/structures, biomechanics for space making, and multiple layers of information, energy simulations, eco-economic strategies, rapid prototypes, cognitive strategies and recording of human potential. 109
  • chapter 3 FacilitieS | Case Study Cheyney University Teams with NORESCO to Save Energy Cheyney University is a landmark site for energy savings Case Study by David Robb, Senior Account Executive, NORESCO Cheyney University of Pennsylvania cherishes its legacy as America’s oldest historically black institution of higher education. Its mission continues, with a vision to be a premier historically black college and university for the 21st century with graduates who contribute to the advancement of the nation and global community. Cheyney leads by example with efficient operation of campus facilities. Through the Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education, Cheyney has implemented more than $15 million in campus upgrades, funded by guaranteed result: a customized, comprehensive set of energy improvements. Students enjoy new and improved windows, better temperature controls in buildings, improved lighting and a smaller carbon footprint. reductions in energy consumption. NORESCO solution Guaranteed energy savings agreements, also called energy savings performance contracts, allow public and private institutions to work together for optimal use of energy and capital. The Cheyney University project is funded by guaranteed cost savings over a 15-year term. This self-funding mechanism reduces the capital appropriations needed to pay for improvements. 110 w w w. c l i m a t e n e u t r a l c a m p u s . c o m The heart of the project was decentralization of the steam plant and steam distribution systems. Old and inefficient systems—including unsightly and dangerous steam leaks from buried pipes—were eliminated. Instead, new, small, high-efficiency hot water and steam boilers were located within the buildings or groups of buildings served. Savings from decentralization were pooled with savings from other conservation measures. The “ ORESCO not only delivered N the improvements promised but completed the decentralization early in order to yield significant additional construction period savings to the university.” –  arl M. Williams, Director of Facilities C Planning and Operations,  Cheyney University
  • Location: Cheyney, Pennsylvania Project Type: Guaranteed Energy Savings Agreement Building Usage: Higher education institution Facility Size: 1,046,004 square feet Term of Contract: 15 years Total Capital Cost: $15,059,495 Benefits Improved energy efficiency, reduced energy and operating costs, greater system reliability, improved working and learning conditions, improved campus aesthetics and reduced greenhouse gas emissions Design Considerations Savings from decommissioning the central boiler plant and installing 21 new, efficient heating systems help fund the project and pay for longer payback items such as new windows For more information, please contact David Robb at (412) 722-9845, www.noresco.com Guaranteed Annual Savings: $1,363,437 About the Author David Robb offers a valuable combination of skills and experience as senior account executive at NORESCO. During his career, Robb has successfully developed more than $200 million in energy savings performance contracts. At NORESCO, his experience in higher education includes projects with Cheyney University, Millersville University, Dixon University Center, St. Mary’s College of Maryland and University of Maryland, Baltimore County. He holds a master of science degree in building construction management from Michigan State University. NORESCO specializes in the development, design, construction, financing and operation of energy and environmental efficiency projects, performance contracting and central energy plants. NORESCO is a subsidiary of Carrier Corp, which is a unit of United Technologies Corp. (NYSE:UTX). 111
  • Solution Provider Index With more than 500 utility and 2,100 commercial customers, as well as 5 million deployed residential devices, Comverge brings unparalleled industry knowledge and experience to offer the most reliable, easy-to-use, and costeffective intelligent energy management programs. We deliver the insight and control that enables energy providers and consumers to optimize their power usage through the industry’s only proven, comprehensive set of technology, services and information management solutions. For more information, visit www.comverge.com._______________________________ 62, 90 As one of the largest U.S. energy services companies, NORESCO specializes in development, design, construction, financing and operation of energy and environmental efficiency projects, performance contracting and central energy plants. NORESCO has implemented more than $2.5 billion in energy savings at more than 2,000 sites throughout the U.S. and abroad. NORESCO is a subsidiary of Carrier Corp., which is a unit of United Technologies Corp. (NYSE: UTX).______________________ 41, 110 Organica recognizes that water use must become sustainable. Our technology treats and recycles water onsite by combining traditional biological treatment with the latest ecological engineering designs. The result is a compact, odorless and cost-efficient system resembling a botanical garden, treating wastewater to the highest standards._ _________ 20–21, 82, 98 _ RGB/CMYK PANTONE Trane, a business of Ingersoll Rand, provides safe, comfortable and efficient building solutions with a differentiating portfolio of offerings to help colleges and universities meet their sustainability and environmental goals in a fiscally sensible manner. For more information, visit trane.com/highereducation._ ______________ 69, 86, 102 112 w w w. c l i m a t e n e u t r a l c a m p u s . c o m www.conedisonsolutions.com ConEdison Solutions, a leading energy services company, provides competitive power supply, renewable energy, sustainability services, and cost-effective energy solutions for public school districts, higher education, government, commercial, industrial, and residential clients. The firm’s dedicated team of energy professionals delivers a broad range of commodity, consulting, and energy performance contracting services._ __________________________________ 85