Slide 1
SIDS-Tourism: Tourism as a Key Sector for
Development in Island States
Climate Change and Environmental Challenges...
Slide 3
SIDS-Tourism Environmental Challenges
Changing Climate - Changing Coasts
• Rising sea levels
• Intense storms and ...
Slide 6
Slide 7
Slide 8
Slide 9
Slide 10
Slide 11
Slide 12
Slide 13
The aim of the CCCRA (2012) was to analyse the vulnerability of the tourism
sector and related sectors t...
each country
Slide 14 CCCRA Methodology & Approach
Slide 15
Slide 16
The Coral Reef Crisis
Beach erosion in Antigua, in the south-
west coast
Slide 17
The Coral Reef Crisis
Here in B...
Slide 19
The Coral Reef Crisis
Also barbados, west coast, south of
Mullins bay
Slide 20
Total Annual and Capital Costs of ...
Slide 22
Barbados Boardwalk
CZMU, Barbados
Slide 23
Barbados Boardwalk
So they planned and designed a
series if grains and...
Slide 25
Ecosystem- Based Adaptation
“ Ecosystem-based adaptation (EbA) harnesses the adaptive forces
of nature and provid...
Slide 28
Slide 29
C-FISH Component 1
Capacity Building For MPA Management
• Grants for enforcement, wardens,
managers, equ...
Slide 31
C-FISH Component 2
Education and Awareness
Public awareness campaign on TV, radio, internet, press and signage.
S...
Slide 34
C-FISH Component- 3
Supporting Local Livelihoods with Private Sector Partnerships
Community Livelihoods
Community...
Slide 37
C-FISH Component 4
The AQUACAM Research Programme
• Develop a cost effective underwater video
system for viewing ...
But Maria Damanaki, the EU
fisheries commissioner, who is
pushing for the reforms, faces stiff
opposition from some member...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Climate Change and Environmental Challenges Panelist Presentation by Dr. Murray Simpson

232 views
167 views

Published on

Climate Change and Environmental Challenges Panelist Presentation by Dr. Murray Simpson

Published in: Business, Technology
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
232
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
2
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Climate Change and Environmental Challenges Panelist Presentation by Dr. Murray Simpson

  1. 1. Slide 1 SIDS-Tourism: Tourism as a Key Sector for Development in Island States Climate Change and Environmental Challenges The CARIBSAVE Partnership & C-FISH Dr Murray Simpson Chief Executive Officer, CARIBSAVE Business Fellow, University of Oxford Melia Nassau Resort Bahamas, 20th February 2014 Slide 2 Protecting and enhancing the livelihoods, environments and economies of the Caribbean Basin Tourism Coastal protection Fisheries Coral Reefs – The Coastal “Fabric” of the Caribbean In the Caribbean, on of the most imporant ecosystems are coral reefs. This picture is of the Buccoo Reef in Tobago where I lived for 8 years, and had the pleasure of working with Lauretta on an ecostem valuation of tobago’s coral reefs. Their value to the fisheries, toruism and coastal protection has been estimated in a umber of studeis, and we will be hearing from lauratta about this after my presentation. Mantaining the ecosystem services provided by Coral reefs is critical to the economic and social sustainability of the Caribbean region
  2. 2. Slide 3 SIDS-Tourism Environmental Challenges Changing Climate - Changing Coasts • Rising sea levels • Intense storms and rainfall events, and coastal siltation • Beach Erosion • Higher water temperatures • Coral Bleaching • Fish migration • Ocean acidification Slide 4 This diagram shows the linkages quite well – all starting from increased C02 levelsin the atmosphere Slide 5 This diagram shows the linkages quite well – all starting from increased C02 levelsin the atmosphere
  3. 3. Slide 6 Slide 7 Slide 8
  4. 4. Slide 9 Slide 10 Slide 11
  5. 5. Slide 12 Slide 13 The aim of the CCCRA (2012) was to analyse the vulnerability of the tourism sector and related sectors to climate change, and suggest adaptation strategies. The CCCRA was funded by UKaid from the United Kingdom Department for International Development (DFID) and the Australian Agency for International Development (AusAID). The project was implemented with the CCCCC and UWI in 15 Caricom countries: Anguilla, Antigua and Barbuda, The Bahamas, Barbados, Belize, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Grenada, Jamaica, Nevis, St. Lucia, St Kitts, St Vincent and the Grenadines, Suriname, and the Turks and Caicos, over a period of 3 years. The main outputs from CCCRA are Climate Change Risk Country Profiles www.caribsave.org CARIBSAVE CLIMATE CHANGE RISK ATLAS (CCCRA) Between 2009 and 2012, I was heavily involved in a project called the Caribsave climate change risk atlas CCCRA. The aim of the CCCRA was to reduce vulnerability and enhance resilience of the tourism sector and related sectors, vital to the economy and livelihoods of the Caribbean region. The CCCRA was funded by UKaid from the United Kingdom Department for International Development (DFID) and the Australian Agency for International Development (AusAID). The project was implemented with CCCCC in 15 countries: Anguilla, Antigua and Barbuda, The Bahamas, Barbados, Belize, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Grenada, Jamaica, Nevis, St. Lucia, St Kitts, St Vincent and the Grenadines, Suriname, and the Turks and Caicos, over a period of 3 years (2008-2011). The main outputs from CCCRA are Climate Change Risk Country Profiles which detail the key climate processes and results specific to
  6. 6. each country Slide 14 CCCRA Methodology & Approach Slide 15
  7. 7. Slide 16 The Coral Reef Crisis Beach erosion in Antigua, in the south- west coast Slide 17 The Coral Reef Crisis Here in Barbados near Mullins bay Slide 18 And here in St Kitts and Nevis
  8. 8. Slide 19 The Coral Reef Crisis Also barbados, west coast, south of Mullins bay Slide 20 Total Annual and Capital Costs of SLR in CARICOM Countries 2050s 2080s Annual Costs US$ billion Capital Costs US$ billion Annual Costs US$ billion Capital Costs US$ billion Mid-Range SLR Scenario 3.9 26 13.5 68.2 High SLR Scenario 6.1 60.7 19.4 187 (in 2010 USD)SOURCE: Quantification and Magnitude of Losses and Damages Resulting from the Impacts of Climate Change: Modelling the Transformational Impacts and Costs of Sea Level Rise in the Caribbean. CARIBSAVE 2010 Slide 21 Barbados Boardwalk CZMU, Barbados A much more serious and succesful engineering option was used on the south-west coast of barbados, in Hastings. This is the Rockley Beach, and there is the Hilton hotel
  9. 9. Slide 22 Barbados Boardwalk CZMU, Barbados Slide 23 Barbados Boardwalk So they planned and designed a series if grains and a seawall and a boardwalk for a 1.2 km strech of coastline, which is now calle dthe Richard Haynes Boardwalk. The total cost was 24million us$ funded by IADB and Government of Barbados Slide 24 Engineering Options - Good examples • Sound science, detailed planning and intensive modeling • Integrate climate change knowledge and expertise • Public consultations • Quality engineering • Maintenance and monitoring • Soft and Hard! •Integrated with management of coastal ecosystems – coral reef
  10. 10. Slide 25 Ecosystem- Based Adaptation “ Ecosystem-based adaptation (EbA) harnesses the adaptive forces of nature and provides one of the most widely applicable, economically viable and effective tools to combat the impacts of climate change. The low-cost, flexible approaches of EbA can also provide multiple other benefits, such as poverty alleviation, sustainable development, carbon storage and biodiversity protection.” Dr Pam Berry, Environmental Change Institute, University of Oxford Science for Environment Policy THEMATIC ISSUE: Ecosystem-based Adaptation March 2013 Issue 37 Slide 26 Caribbean Fish Sanctuaries Partnership Initiative The aim is to improve the management of 15 fish sanctuaries in order to promote sustainable livelihoods and increase the resilience of coastal resources to climate change. It is part of The CARICOM Regional Framework for Achieving Development Resilient to Climate Change implemented by the CCCCC It is 4-year project (2012-2016) funded by UKAID (£2.1 million) through CCCCC, and implemented by CARIBSAVE in Jamaica, St Vincent and the Grenadines, Grenada, St Lucia, Dominica. Slide 27 Caribbean Fish Sanctuaries Partnership Initiative (C-FISH)
  11. 11. Slide 28 Slide 29 C-FISH Component 1 Capacity Building For MPA Management • Grants for enforcement, wardens, managers, equipment, patrol boats, engines, … • Strengthening Governance • Training in MPA management • Community-based Monitoring; socio-economic and ecological Slide 30
  12. 12. Slide 31 C-FISH Component 2 Education and Awareness Public awareness campaign on TV, radio, internet, press and signage. Slide 32 Slide 33 • Community-based tourism • Offshore fishing - FADs • Craft Programme C-FISH Component 3 MSMEs and Alternative Livelihoods
  13. 13. Slide 34 C-FISH Component- 3 Supporting Local Livelihoods with Private Sector Partnerships Community Livelihoods Community-based tourism Craft Programme Offshore fishing ACCESS TO MARKETS Slide 35 Artificial reefs can be a mechanism to monetize conservation and ecosystem-based adaptatioin restoration Slide 36 Tourism Products and Services Facilitated By Partners Marine Protected Areas C-FISH Component 3 MSMEs, Tourism, Fisheries and Sustainable Financing for MPAs
  14. 14. Slide 37 C-FISH Component 4 The AQUACAM Research Programme • Develop a cost effective underwater video system for viewing and monitoring fish populations • Aquacam System will use Wi-Fi transmitter to send stereo video stream to base station where it can be uploaded to internet Slide 38 Key Stages in Ecosystem-Based Adaptation Stage 1 – Good Scientific Understanding of Ecological and Social System Stage 2 – Appropriate Policy Frameworks and Planning Stage 3 – Making it Happen: Incentives for short, medium and long Term Administer Grants and Provide Technical support Focus on livelihoods Sectors; MSMEs & Big Business e.g. tourism Develop Partnership with Private sector Sustainable financing linked to local livelihoods Innovative solutions – hard/soft engineering Focus on Gender – the role of women Slide 39 Thank You Dr Murray Simpson www.caribsave.org murray.simpson@ouce.ox.ac.uk Restoring fish stocks would be worth £2.7bn a year, in the form of catches about 3.5m tonnes greater than at present, and an expanded fishing economy, and would support more than 100,000 new jobs in the sector. Sweeping reforms to the EU's common fisheries policy are under discussion this year in Brussels. One of the key proposed changes is to end the wasteful practice of discarding edible fish at sea, as a result of which as much as half of the catch are thrown back dead in some areas.
  15. 15. But Maria Damanaki, the EU fisheries commissioner, who is pushing for the reforms, faces stiff opposition from some member states and vested interests within Europe's fishing industries. Some fishermen fear that ending discards would mean lower profits, because they would be forced to land lower value fish – at present, they can choose only to land the most profitable fish. The Guardian saw a document this year that was prepared in the final days of Spain's previous administration, laying out how Spanish ministers and officials would oppose key aspects of the reforms. Spain has the biggest fishing industry in the EU and supplements its own share of European fish resources by buying up the rights to fish in other countries, chiefly developing nations. Spain's new government has not yet made public its stance on the proposed reforms, but its ministers are coming under intense lobbying pressure from the fishing industry, which is broadly opposed to changes to the current system of quotas and subsidies, from which it benefits disproportionately to the rest of Europe.

×