Presented by the CITY OF LOS ANGELES DEPARTMENT OF CULTURAL AFFAIRS
2014 CALENDAR AND CULTURAL GUIDE
CITY OF LOS ANGELES 2014 CELEBRATION
City of Los Angeles
Eric Garcetti
Mayor
Doane Liu
Deputy Mayor
City Services
Mike Feu...
1
AFRICAN AMERICAN HERITAGE MONTH
CITY OF LOS ANGELES 2014 CELEBRATION
Eric Garcetti
mayor
Dear Friends,
As Mayor, it is m...
2
AFRICAN AMERICAN HERITAGE MONTH
CITY OF LOS ANGELES 2014 CELEBRATION
herb J. wesson, jr.
los angeles city council
presid...
3
Toni Scott, Genocide, Slavery, Inhumanity, Power Plays, How Nations Get Rich, Digital rendering, 36” x 36”, 2009
4
AFRICAN AMERICAN HERITAGE MONTH
CITY OF LOS ANGELES 2014 CELEBRATION
Matthew rudnick
interim general manager
City of los...
5
african american heritage month committee
Mike Davis
2014 African American Heritage Month Committee Chair
Board of Publi...
6
Duane Paul, at left, Greed, Acrylic, ink, gouache on watercolor paper, 22” x 28”, 1991,
at right, Urban Hustle, Acrylic,...
7
8
LIFETIME ACHIEVEMENT AWARD
LOUIS GOSSETT, jr.
Louis Gossett, Jr. made his professional acting debut at the age of 17 in ...
9
Bryan Tilford, When Heroes Were Heroes, Acrylic on canvas board, 20” x 24”
10
SPIRIT OF LOS ANGELES
CHARLIE WILSON
The Natural. This simple phrase eloquently captures the essence of
Charlie Wilson....
11
the hit single “There Goes My Baby.” A year later, Wilson stepped back up to
the plate with “Just Charlie” and his bigg...
12
DREAM OF LOS ANGELES
ANGELA BASSETT
Alluring audiences with emotionally tinged performances has been the
signature of A...
13
a weekend wedding in Martha’s Vineyard. Bassett played “Claudine Watson,” “Sabrina’s” (Paula Patton) mother,
heiress to...
14
Toni Scott, African Warrior, Clay, 35” x 15” x 9”, 2000
15
Hall of Fame
Award Winners
CITY OF LOS ANGELES AFRICAN AMERICAN HERITAGE MONTH AWARDS
U.s. Judge consuelo Marshall
law
...
16
Duane Paul, Winged Female, Acrylic and oil stick on canvas, 30” x 40”, 1994
17
2014 african american heritage month presentation in city hall council chambers
Join Mayor Eric Garcetti; Council Presi...
18
Buena Johnson, Angel of Love, Pencil and mixed media drawing, 2011
19
Our authors study club
Los Angeles branch of the association for the study of
african american life and history, inc.
2...
20
Our Authors Study Club
2014 General Chair
J.L. Armstrong
National Manager, Corporate Affairs
Toyota Motor Sales, U.S.A....
21
Our authors study club
Los Angeles branch of the association for the study of
african american life and history, inc.
2...
22
Shanequa Gay, Quiet Strength of Jubilee, Oil on wood panel
23
Our authors study club
Los Angeles branch of the association for the study of
african american life and history, inc.
O...
24
father of black history
Founder of the Association for the
study of African American Life and History
Dr. Carter Godwin...
25
founder of our authors study club, inc.
los angeles branch of the association for the
study of african american life an...
26
Lee Ransaw, Bell & Feather, Mixed media
27
AFRICAN AMERICAN HERITAGE MONTH
OPENING CEREMONY WITH OUR AUTHORS
STUDY CLUB, Inc.
Join Mayor Eric Garcetti and Our Aut...
28
Toni Scott, Roots, Ropes & Remembrance, Slavery in America, Digital and photography, 36” x 36”, 2010
29
A Window to the World
Dysonna City Art Gallery presents Alex Elena in
an exhibit from Kenya, Africa. With a passion for...
30
Double Fortune, Double Trouble: Art for
Twins among the Yoruba
This exhibition explores the power and prevalence
of “tw...
31
The March on Washington:
A Tribute, 50 Years Later
It is estimated that 250,000 men and women, black and
white, young a...
32
Shaping Power: Luba Masterworks from
the Royal Museum for Central Africa
Shaping Power features Luba masterworks from
t...
33
Richard Procello, at top, Crenshaw Plaza, 1992, at bottom, Union Station, both, Photography
34
Janet E. Dandridge, From the Cloud Series, Photography
35
22nd Annual Pan African Film AND
Arts Festival
America’s largest black film festival showcasing over
150 new films from...
36
Black Inventors
A look at early and present Black inventors who have
contributed to the prosperity and well-being of th...
37
Educators’ Rollout: Tom Bradley
Bridging the Divide Curriculum Guides
Educators are invited to attend the premiere scre...
38
The Legacy of Abolitionism
Panel on legacy of U.S. Abolitionist movement with
Dr. Melina Abdulah, Chair of Pan-African ...
39
Carter G. Woodson African American
History Series 2014: Then and Now
Black Power, Soul Power, Word Power
The fiery and ...
40
The Impact of Music on the Civil Rights
Movement by Dr. Lance Williams
This lecture will be an ethnomusicology discussi...
41
African American Heritage Celebration
This afternoon celebration includes poetry, storytelling,
live gospel, jazz, and ...
42
Created Equal
A public screening of the film “Freedom Riders”
followed by a conversation to relate past struggles
for f...
43
African American Festival
Join the Aquarium of the Pacific during its 12th
annual African American Festival, celebratin...
44
Afro-American Chamber Music Society
Orchestra
A music concert with the Afro-American Chamber
Music Society Orchestra.
W...
45
Toni Scott, Yes I am Native American Too, Black Indian Girl, Digital rendering, 40” x 30”, 2011
46
Design by Yarn/Art Workshop #2
Second finger-knitting workshop facilitated by USC
students as part of the CAAM/USC Rosk...
47
I Got My Pride – The Blues Tales
of Leadbelly
The William Grant Still Arts Center’s 6th annual
African American Compose...
48
CITY OF LOS ANGELES 2014 CELEBRATION
MARCH
Mardi Gras
A celebration of “Fat Tuesday” Olvera Street style
with a childre...
49
The Contested Murder of Latasha
Harlins by Dr. Brenda E. Stevenson
UCLA History professor and scholar, Dr. Stevenson, w...
50
CITY OF LOS ANGELES 2014 CELEBRATION
MARCH
Norman Brown and Gerald Albright
When Grammy-winning guitarist Norman Brown ...
51
June Edmonds, D.J., Oil on canvas, 12” x 24”, 2013
52
Bryan Tilford, at left, Mo’ Fro, Acrylic on canvas board, 2013,
at right, Sista’ Feelin’ Her Fro, Acrylic on canvas boa...
53
54
A TRIBUTE TO
MARIE HARRIS
THE SECOND ANNIVERSARY COMMEMORATING
THE NAMING OF MARIE HARRIS SQUARE
On February 18, 2012, ...
55
Marie then turned her designer’s eye toward designing a community. As part of her
community service, Marie:
•	 Produced...
56
Teresa Tolliver, Tribal Spirit, Mixed media, 4” x 3”, 2013
57
MARTIN LUTHER KING, JR // Early Readers
HAPPY BIRTHDAY, DR. KING!
Written by Kathryn Jones
Illustrated by Floyd Cooper
...
58
MARTIN LUTHER KING, JR / Middle Readers
JUST LIKE MARTIN
Written by Eleanora E. Tate
Publisher: Just Us
Young Stone is ...
59
CIVIL RIGHTS + SLAVERY // Early Readers
A BAND OF ANGELS: A STORY INSPIRED BY THE
JUBILEE SINGERS
Written by Deborah Ho...
60
IF A BUS COULD TALK: THE STORY OF ROSA PARKS
Written and Illustrated by Faith Ringgold
Publisher: Houghton Mifflin
In a...
61
Christine Brannon Nelson, both top and bottom, The Search for Peace, at top, Oil on canvas, at bottom, Watercolor on pa...
62
MANY THOUSANDS GONE: AFRICAN AMERICANS
FROM SLAVERY TO FREEDOM
Written by Virginia Hamilton
Illustrated by Leo and Dian...
63
OH, FREEDOM!: KIDS TALK ABOUT THE CIVIL
RIGHTS MOVEMENT WITH THE PEOPLE WHO
MADE IT HAPPEN
Written by Casey King and Li...
64
INVISIBLE MAN
Written by Ralph Ellison
Publisher: Random House
Invisible Man is a nightmarish novel of a man trying
to ...
65
NATIVE SON
Written by Richard Wright
Publisher: Harper Perennial
Native Son deals with the problems an African
American...
66
EXPLORE BLACK HISTORY WITH WEE PALS
Written and Illustrated by Morrie Turner
Publisher: Just Us
The Wee Pals, comic-str...
67
LIFE + CULTURE // Middle Readers
COMING TOGETHER: CELEBRATIONS FOR AFRICAN
AMERICAN FAMILIES
Written by Harriette Cole
...
68
REFLECTIONS OF A BLACK COWBOY: THE BUFFALO
SOLDIERS
Written by Robert Miller
Illustrated by Richard Leonard
Publisher: ...
69
LIFE + CULTURE // High School Readers
THE COLOR PURPLE
Written by Alice Walker
Publisher: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich
Cel...
70
Toni Scott, Earth, Stone Carving, Chlorite, 2011
71
Literary Artists
The Department of Cultural Affairs is pleased to present the works of
four fine writers for the 2014 A...
72
My Black Is
Ohhh so beautiful...
I’m talking honey-brown
amber hue
thick thighs
slightly almond-shaped eyes
bee stung l...
73
One
I AM THE ONLY ONE IN EXISTENCE…
I AM EVERYONE AND EVERYTHING YOU SEE…
THERE IS NO END…THERE’S NO BEGINNING…
I JUST ...
2014 City of Los Angeles African American Heritage Month Calendar and Cultural Guide
2014 City of Los Angeles African American Heritage Month Calendar and Cultural Guide
2014 City of Los Angeles African American Heritage Month Calendar and Cultural Guide
2014 City of Los Angeles African American Heritage Month Calendar and Cultural Guide
2014 City of Los Angeles African American Heritage Month Calendar and Cultural Guide
2014 City of Los Angeles African American Heritage Month Calendar and Cultural Guide
2014 City of Los Angeles African American Heritage Month Calendar and Cultural Guide
2014 City of Los Angeles African American Heritage Month Calendar and Cultural Guide
2014 City of Los Angeles African American Heritage Month Calendar and Cultural Guide
2014 City of Los Angeles African American Heritage Month Calendar and Cultural Guide
2014 City of Los Angeles African American Heritage Month Calendar and Cultural Guide
2014 City of Los Angeles African American Heritage Month Calendar and Cultural Guide
2014 City of Los Angeles African American Heritage Month Calendar and Cultural Guide
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2014 City of Los Angeles African American Heritage Month Calendar and Cultural Guide

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2014 City of Los Angeles African American Heritage Month Calendar and Cultural Guide
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2014 City of Los Angeles African American Heritage Month Calendar and Cultural Guide

  1. 1. Presented by the CITY OF LOS ANGELES DEPARTMENT OF CULTURAL AFFAIRS 2014 CALENDAR AND CULTURAL GUIDE
  2. 2. CITY OF LOS ANGELES 2014 CELEBRATION City of Los Angeles Eric Garcetti Mayor Doane Liu Deputy Mayor City Services Mike Feuer Los Angeles City Attorney Ron Galperin Los Angeles City Controller Los Angeles City Council Herb J. Wesson, Jr. District 10 President Gilbert Cedillo, District 1 Paul Krekorian, District 2 Bob Blumenfield, District 3 Tom LaBonge, District 4 Paul Koretz, District 5 Nury Martinez, District 6 Felipe Fuentes, District 7 Bernard C. Parks, District 8 Curren D. Price, Jr., District 9 Mike Bonin, District 11 Mitchell Englander, District 12 Mitch O’Farrell, District 13 Jose Huizar, District 14 Joe Buscaino, District 15 Cultural Affairs Commission Maria Bell Mari Edelman Charmaine Jefferson Sonia Molina Richard Montoya Eric Paquette City of Los Angeles Department of Cultural Affairs Matthew Rudnick Interim General Manager Will Caperton y Montoya Director of Marketing and Development Calendar Production Will Caperton y Montoya Editor and Art Director Martica Caraballo Stork Assistant Editor Print & Interactive Calendar Design Terese Harris tmharris@pmacservices.com Antrese Palacios antrese@antrese.com Cover Artist: Shanequa Gay, The Safety of Literacy, Mixed media, collage paper, newsprint, acrylic and oil on wood panel View events and artwork online at: laheritagemonth.org culturela.org
  3. 3. 1 AFRICAN AMERICAN HERITAGE MONTH CITY OF LOS ANGELES 2014 CELEBRATION Eric Garcetti mayor Dear Friends, As Mayor, it is my sincere pleasure to lead our city in celebrating African American Heritage Month. The contributions of our African American residents in the arts, academia, business, government, and the nonprofit sectors are immense and well-worth recognizing year-round. Throughout our great city, we welcome the celebration of African American Heritage Month, and I encourage you to experience L.A.’s rich African American culture by participating in its traditions and customs. I hope you will use this Calendar and Cultural Guide created by our Department of Cultural Affairs (DCA) to learn about the many activities happening all over L.A. in celebration of African American Heritage Month. Please participate in this celebration, and enjoy all our neighborhood arts and cultural centers have to offer. I also encourage you to enjoy the work of Los Angeles’ emerging and established African American artists showcased by DCA throughout this publication. These artists keep heritage alive and vibrant in innovative and contemporary ways, providing us with visual treasurers to admire. Sincerely, Eric Garcetti Mayor City of Los Angeles
  4. 4. 2 AFRICAN AMERICAN HERITAGE MONTH CITY OF LOS ANGELES 2014 CELEBRATION herb J. wesson, jr. los angeles city council president Dear Friends, On behalf of the Los Angeles City Council, it is my privilege to invite you to celebrate African American Heritage Month in our great City! People from around the world have made Los Angeles their home, and each culture contributes to the rich diversity that makes it among the foremost cities in the world. This month we continue to honor the achievements of our City’s African Americans, and acknowledge their contributions to this great culture. With this calendar, our Department of Cultural Affairs (DCA) highlights the work of our artists who keep our shared African American traditions alive and thriving in our communities. DCA offers a wide array of arts and cultural events for your enjoyment. Please refer to this calendar to find the numerous festivals, musical events, theatrical performances, films, poetry readings, and cultural activities in your neighborhood. I encourage you to take part in the special events listed throughout these pages, and welcome you into our Neighborhood Arts and Cultural Centers to celebrate African American Heritage Month in the City of Angels. It is sure to be a memorable celebration! Sincerely, Herb J. Wesson, Jr. President Los Angeles City Council
  5. 5. 3 Toni Scott, Genocide, Slavery, Inhumanity, Power Plays, How Nations Get Rich, Digital rendering, 36” x 36”, 2009
  6. 6. 4 AFRICAN AMERICAN HERITAGE MONTH CITY OF LOS ANGELES 2014 CELEBRATION Matthew rudnick interim general manager City of los angeles department of cultural affairs Dear Friends, The Department of Cultural Affairs is pleased to present this calendar of events celebrating the vibrant African American cultural traditions that continue to shape the unique heritage of our great City. These events honor the extraordinary range of African American experiences, from ancient traditions, to the contemporary voices of our artists and storytellers. We are pleased to showcase engaging art produced by our Los Angeles artists in this publication. Their vision pays homage to steps taken in the past, but looks towards the future with a contemporary edge. Combined with the work of other artists of African descent around the City, they truly represent the heart and soul of this year’s African American Heritage Month Celebration. Since our City knows few boundaries, we are collaborating with our colleagues in neighboring cities to include calendar events around the Los Angeles area. We engaged our partners and community leaders to support these events, and want to acknowledge our appreciation for their ongoing generosity. We also extend our thanks to the members of Our Authors Study Club, the Mayor’s staff, the Council President’s staff, and the many nonprofit organizations, community groups, and arts organizations whose efforts helped us create this impressive listing of fun, educational, and exciting events. What better place to see fantastic art, experience a taste of African American culture, and celebrate a City’s great heritage than Los Angeles? We hope you will join in the festivities and enjoy! Sincerely, Matthew Rudnick Interim General Manager City of Los Angeles Department of Cultural Affairs
  7. 7. 5 african american heritage month committee Mike Davis 2014 African American Heritage Month Committee Chair Board of Public Works Alvin C. Arquisola Bureau of Sanitation Will Caperton y Montoya Department of Cultural Affairs Martica Caraballo Stork Department of Cultural Affairs Marilyn Cole Chef Marilyn Lena Cole Dennis Our Authors Study Club, Inc. Mary C. Cotton Our Authors Study Club, Inc. Theresa Curtis Our Authors Study Club, Inc. Lura Daniels-Ball Our Authors Study Club, Inc. Paqueta Davis Our Authors Study Club, Inc. Larry Earl Mayme A. Clayton Library and Museum Lena Echols J.U.G.S., Inc. Laura Farwell Our Authors Study Club, Inc. Ernestine J. Gordon Our Authors Study Club, Inc. Mildred Gordon Our Authors Study Club, Inc. Ron Hasson NAACP Jacquelyn Hawthorne LAAAW PAC Cora Jackson-Fossett Public Affairs Office Maude Johnson Our Authors Study Club, Inc. Richard Lee Public Affairs Office Albert E. Lord LA City Council President Herb Wesson’s Office Peggy McClellan Our Authors Study Club, Inc. Mordena Moore Our Authors Study Club, Inc. Mary Louise Reeves Our Authors Study Club, Inc. Pierre Riotoc General Services Special Events Eric Robles General Services Special Events Matthew Rudnick Department of Cultural Affairs Genevieve Shepherd Our Authors Study Club, Inc. Alvetia E. Smith United States Postal Service Eduardo Soriano-Hewitt Office of the Mayor Kenneth Wyrick BHNC members CITY OF LOS ANGELES 2014 CELEBRATION Civil Rights in America 2014 Theme
  8. 8. 6 Duane Paul, at left, Greed, Acrylic, ink, gouache on watercolor paper, 22” x 28”, 1991, at right, Urban Hustle, Acrylic, ink, gouache on board, 24” x 24”, 1991
  9. 9. 7
  10. 10. 8 LIFETIME ACHIEVEMENT AWARD LOUIS GOSSETT, jr. Louis Gossett, Jr. made his professional acting debut at the age of 17 in the play Take a Giant Step, winning the Donaldson Award as best newcomer to theatre. He went to NYU on a basketball scholarship and was invited to try out for the NY Knicks, yet he decided to continue his acting career with a role in the Broadway production of A Raisin in the Sun alongside Sidney Poitier. Now almost six decades later, he has appeared in 167 films and television shows that have garnered him numerous awards including: three Golden Globes; two Emmys - one of which was for his portrayal of Fiddler in Roots; and, of course, an Oscar for his unforgettable performance as Gunnery Sgt. Emil Foley in An Officer and a Gentleman. Although Mr. Gossett is still working in films, with an emphasis on faith-based stories, he is primarily dedicating ‘the last quadrant’ of his life to an all-out conscious offensive against racism, violence, ignorance, and social apathy. The Shamba Centers under his Eracism Foundation holds classes, seminars, workshops, and exercises for teens and pre-teens to help them understand and eliminate racism by creating a living environment where racism and injustice have difficulty in existing. The purpose of Mr. Gossett’s guest appearances is to generate relevant stories in the media so young people will know on who’s shoulders they stand, what history they represent, and what is expected of them. He encourages them to connect with their spirituality and improve their conduct with the overall result of becoming respectful, responsible, disciplined, and positive Americans. His recent autobiographical book, An Actor and a Gentleman, is not your run-of-the-mill Hollywood memoir, but rather a funny, fascinating, and sometimes heartbreaking tour through the last half-century of American life, as seen through the eyes of one of our most talented artists. Louis Gossett Jr. – athlete, actor, educator, activist, author – is still taking giant steps. CITY OF LOS ANGELES AFRICAN AMERICAN HERITAGE MONTH AWARDS
  11. 11. 9 Bryan Tilford, When Heroes Were Heroes, Acrylic on canvas board, 20” x 24”
  12. 12. 10 SPIRIT OF LOS ANGELES CHARLIE WILSON The Natural. This simple phrase eloquently captures the essence of Charlie Wilson. 2013 was a phenomenal year for Wilson, and 2014 finds Charlie again at the top of his game. He has garnered his seventh Grammy nomination for his inspirational song, “If I Believe” as Best Gospel Song. This is Wilson’s first nomination in the gospel category. The accolades continued as he has received two 2014 NAACP Image Award Nominations for Outstanding Male Artist and Outstanding Album. He was honored in 2013 with a BET Lifetime Achievement Award at the BET Awards. The musical tribute honoring Charlie will long be remembered as one of the finest tributes ever paid to a legend. It included India Arie, Stevie Wonder, Jamie Foxx, Snoop Lion, Pharrell, and Justin Timberlake. Wilson joined Justin, Snoop, and Pharrell for a medley of songs including: “Signs,” “Beautiful,” and numerous hits from The GAP Band. Other prestigious awards given to Wilson in 2013 included a Lifetime Achievement Award from the Trumpet Awards Foundation and a Soultracks Reader’s Choice Award for Major Label Album of the Year for “Love, Charlie.” 2013 was also the year Wilson shared his talents outside of the U.S. with sold out shows in London, Paris, and Basel, Switzerland. After performing together on Jimmy Fallon, Kanye West invited Charlie to join him in the UK and Paris on television to perform “Bound 2” from West’s current album, “Yeezus.” Wilson returned to the UK to ring in the new year on Jools Holland’s Annual Hootenanny, the biggest New Year’s Eve show in the UK. Throughout his solo career Wilson has stayed true to who he is musically and creatively while raising the bar each time. In the early 1990s, Wilson became a friend and regular collaborator with Snoop Dogg. Their relationship provided him with access to many artists who idolized him, as well as fresh, emerging talent who have inspired him to continue pushing the limits of his own material. Wilson has since collaborated with a diverse array of artists including Kanye West, R. Kelly, Will.i.am, Jamie Foxx, T-Pain, Fantasia, Justin Timberlake, and 2 Chainz on the 2012 Soul Train Awards. Working past his addictions, Wilson, now sober for 19 years, landed his first No. 1 Billboard Urban AC hit in 2000, “Without You.” His gold-certified “Jive” debut, 2005’s “Charlie Last Name Wilson,” yielded a top 15 R&B single via the title track. “Uncle Charlie” arrived in 2009, garnering the artist two Grammy nominations: Best R&B Album and Best Male R&B Vocal Performance for CITY OF LOS ANGELES AFRICAN AMERICAN HERITAGE MONTH AWARDS
  13. 13. 11 the hit single “There Goes My Baby.” A year later, Wilson stepped back up to the plate with “Just Charlie” and his biggest hit to date, “You Are.” After 13 consecutive weeks at No. 1, the song scored two Grammy nods for Best R&B Song and Best R&B Performance. He was also named Billboard’s No. 1 Adult Artist and his single, “You Are” was named the No. 1 Adult R&B Song. In addition to his six Grammy nominations, Wilson is a recipient of the 2005 BMI Icon Award and a 2009 Soul Train Icon Award. Wilson has come a long way from the highs of his heyday with The Gap Band to the lows of his alcohol and drug addictions. The Tulsa, Oklahoma native formed the pivotal R&B funk trio with brothers Ronnie and Robert. Raised by a minister father and mother who served as the state’s minister of music, the siblings hit the charts running in the late ‘70s and ‘80s with a string of hits. These included “Outstanding,” “You Dropped a Bomb on Me,” “Yearning For Your Love,” “Early in the Morning,” “I Don’t Believe You Want to Get Up and Dance (Oops Up Side Your Head),” “Party Train,” “Wednesday Lover,” and “All of My Love.” The group retired in 2010. Still burning rubber on stage, the energetic Wilson averages 75 to 100 shows a year between concert tours, festivals, and private events. He also finds time to give back. Wilson remains committed to promoting awareness and educating the male community about prostate cancer. A survivor of a disease that afflicts one in six American men, and one in three African-American men, Wilson became a spokesperson for the Prostate Cancer Foundation in 2008. In April 2012 he announced his partnership with Janssen Biotech to launch the company’s Making Awareness A Priority (M.A.P.) campaign. The program brings together leading voices in advocacy and health education through live events in select cities across the country. He continues to do his part to educate men and their families about the importance of taking control of their lives and discussing their health with their health care provider annually. With the release of “Love, Charlie,” Wilson says the concept behind his music can be summed up in one sentence: “The whole world needs inspiration.” Better yet, the whole world needs Charlie Wilson.
  14. 14. 12 DREAM OF LOS ANGELES ANGELA BASSETT Alluring audiences with emotionally tinged performances has been the signature of Angela Bassett, who personifies a sense of dignity and pride whenever she appears on screen. Her talent and abilities as an actress and executive producer in both television and film have time and time again earned respect and acclaim from her peers and fans, proving her to be one of the industry’s premier leading ladies. 
 Angela can be seen with the impressive cast of the third season of the hit FX series American Horror Story: Coven as Marie Laveau, the historical voodoo queen and leader of the Coven’s most powerful rivals in the Dark Arts. Angela recently returned to the musical front in Fox Searchlight’s Black Nativity opposite Forest Whitaker for director Kasi Lemmons. The musical, inspired by Langston Hughes’ work, transposes the plight of an unwed mother looking for a place to have a baby on a cold night in a cold city to twentieth- century America. Meanwhile, a young boy meets his grandparents for the first time and forms new bonds with his struggling mother. Angela will soon work on the upcoming film Survivor opposite Pierce Brosnan, Emma Thompson, and Milla Jovovich for director James McTeigue. Production starts shooting in London in January 2014. Angela was seen as Lynne Jacobs, the head of the secret service in Olympus Has Fallen for FilmDistrict opposite Morgan Freeman, Gerard Butler, and Aaron Eckhart for director Antoine Fuqua. She will reprise her role in the upcoming sequel London Has Fallen. She will be seen in the upcoming Indie Whitebird In A Blizzard, directed by Gregg Araki. Angela will be seen as Dr. Thaler, a pivotal role opposite Shailene Woodley. Angela was recently seen as Coretta Scott King in the Lifetime movie Betty and Coretta following the lives that Betty Shabazz and Coretta Scott King faced as single mothers after the assassination of their husbands. Angela starred opposite Samuel L. Jackson in the Broadway premiere of Katori Hall’s Olivier Award winning play Mountaintop. Mountaintop was a gripping reimagining of events the night before the assassination of civil rights leader Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Angela also starred in Columbia Pictures’ wedding themed comedy Jumping The Broom alongside Paula Patton. The hilarious and touching Jumping The Broom revolves around the clash of two African-American families from opposite ends of the socioeconomic spectrum meeting for the first time during CITY OF LOS ANGELES AFRICAN AMERICAN HERITAGE MONTH AWARDS
  15. 15. 13 a weekend wedding in Martha’s Vineyard. Bassett played “Claudine Watson,” “Sabrina’s” (Paula Patton) mother, heiress to the Watson family fortune and a pillar of the Washington D.C. elite. Perhaps best known for her intense portrayal of Tina Turner in the biopic What’s Love Got To Do With It opposite Laurence Fishburne, Angela earned the Golden Globe for Best Actress in a Musical, an NAACP Image Award for Outstanding Lead Actress in a Motion Picture, and an Academy Award nomination for her powerful performance.  Bassett first made the successful crossover to the silver screen when she appeared in a small but rich role as the ambitious single mother who sends her son to live with his father in John Singleton’s Boyz N The Hood. Other memorable roles include, Terry McMillan’s Waiting To Exhale co-starring Whitney Houston, Kathryn Bigelow’s futuristic Strange Days with Ralph Fiennes, Vampire In Brooklyn opposite Eddie Murphy, and Supernova with James Spader.  Angela also starred as Violetta Wallace, mother of slain rapper, Christopher “Notorious B.I.G.” in Notorious.  Angela has also received NAACP Image Awards for performances in films such as How Stella Got Her Groove Back opposite Whoopi Goldberg and Taye Diggs, The Score opposite Robert DeNiro, Edward Norton and Marlon Brando, Music Of The Heart with Meryl Streep, Malcom X opposite Denzel Washington, Contact opposite Jodie Foster and for Boesman and Lena with Danny Glover.  She was also recognized for her leading role in the television movie Ruby’s Bucket of Blood, bringing her total number of Image Awards to nine.  Bassett received a Screen Actors Guild Award nomination for her performance in Ruby’s Bucket of Blood and an Emmy nomination for Best Actress in a television movie for her work in The Rosa Parks Story. For the ABC mini-series The Jacksons: An American Dream, Angela received critical raves for her touching performance as Katherine Jackson; an Emmy nomination for the Uncle Jed’s Barbershop episode of PBS’ Storytime; and critical nods for narrating the miniseries, Africans in America, also for PBS. Angela’s other notable television roles have included the final season of NBC’s hit primetime series E.R., as Dr. Cate Banfield, and a recurring role in ABC’s hit drama series Alias. Nominations and awards aside, one of the most gratifying moments of her career was the opportunity to merge faith and talent when she gave voice to various characters in the all-time best selling audio book The Bible Experience.  Beginning her career on stage and continuing to this day, this Yale School of Drama graduate completed several productions on and off Broadway. She and her husband, actor Courtney B. Vance, co-wrote the book, Friends: A Love Story. The inspirational book is the real-life love story of Bassett and Vance, who were friends for many years before marrying. They have also formed Bassett Vance Productions and their first venture, Book Of The Year, marks Bassett’s directorial debut. Based on the novel Erasure by Percival Everett and adapted by Dwayne Johnson-Cochran, the dramatic comedy follows Monk Ellison, a prominent black literary figure. Ellison writes a faux biography from the perspective of a barely literate hoodlum to decry what is wrong with the glorification of “ghetto” culture but when the book is lauded as a possible contender for the National Book Award, he must choose between pride and fame. The couple resides outside of Los Angeles with their twins, Bronwyn Golden and Slater Josiah. Yrneh, My Beloved Mwanza, Mixed media, 12” x 82”, 2012
  16. 16. 14 Toni Scott, African Warrior, Clay, 35” x 15” x 9”, 2000
  17. 17. 15 Hall of Fame Award Winners CITY OF LOS ANGELES AFRICAN AMERICAN HERITAGE MONTH AWARDS U.s. Judge consuelo Marshall law Dr. James Rosser education supervisor Yvonne burke (Retired) politics
  18. 18. 16 Duane Paul, Winged Female, Acrylic and oil stick on canvas, 30” x 40”, 1994
  19. 19. 17 2014 african american heritage month presentation in city hall council chambers Join Mayor Eric Garcetti; Council President Herb J. Wesson, Jr. and the Los Angeles City Council; Board of Public Works Commissioner Mike Davis; the Department of Cultural Affairs (DCA); Our Authors Study Club, Inc.; and the 2014 African American Heritage Month Committee to officially commemorate and celebrate the opening of African American Heritage Month in the City of Los Angeles. At this presentation in City Hall’s Council Chambers, DCA’s 2014 African American Heritage Month Calendar and Cultural Guide will be officially unveiled, and Los Angeles elected officials will recognize and honor Louis Gossett, Jr., Angela Bassett, Charlie Wilson, U.S. Judge Consuelo Marshall, Dr. James Rosser, and Supervisor Yvonne Burke. WHEN: February 11, 10:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m. WHERE: City Hall Council Chambers Followed by Program, Entertainment, and Reception with Catering by Chef Marilyn Outside City Hall City Hall, 200 North Spring Street, Los Angeles, CA 90012 COST: Free SPONSORS: ABC7, AT&T, Fox Audience Strategy, Nielsen, The Walt Disney Company, Time Warner Cable, Toyota, Toyota Financial Services, Wells Fargo, Office of the Mayor, Los Angeles City Council, Department of Cultural Affairs, Board of Public Works, Our Author’s Study Club, Inc., and the 2014 African American Heritage Month Committee INFO: 213.978.0254 CITY OF LOS ANGELES 2014 CELEBRATION opening ceremony
  20. 20. 18 Buena Johnson, Angel of Love, Pencil and mixed media drawing, 2011
  21. 21. 19 Our authors study club Los Angeles branch of the association for the study of african american life and history, inc. 2014 officers Our Authors Study Club, Inc. LA Branch of ASALH Post Office Box 882025 Los Angeles, CA 90009-3019 CITY OF LOS ANGELES 2014 CELEBRATION Civil Rights in America Ernestine Janet Gordon President members Mary C. Cotton 1st Vice President Peggy McClellan 2nd Vice President Maude Johnson 3rd Vice President Theresa Curtis Recording Secretary Lura Daniels-Ball Corresponding Secretary Paqueta Davis Financial Secretary M. Stephene Johnson Treasurer Nailah Malik Historian Ernestine Huff Parliamentarian Albertine Brown Chaplain Caroline Culpepper Laura Falwell Mildred M. Gordon Toni M. Humber Beatrice Jones Mildred Midkiff Christine B. Nelson Mary Louise Reeves Helen Steward Mordena M. Moore Executive Director Dr. Genevieve A. Shepherd President Emerita
  22. 22. 20 Our Authors Study Club 2014 General Chair J.L. Armstrong National Manager, Corporate Affairs Toyota Motor Sales, U.S.A., Inc. J.L. Armstrong is National Manager, Corporate Affairs, for Toyota Motor Sales, U.S.A., Inc. (TMS), and has responsibility for a multi-million dollar in-house video production center, the Toyota USA Automobile Museum, that houses 140 Toyota, Lexus, Scion, and Motorsports vehicles dating back to 1959. He also oversees TMS dealer diversity and inclusion initiatives. Armstrong serves as a community ambassador for Toyota and external affairs advisor to senior TMS management. In addition, he was appointed by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in 2005 to the Board of Directors for the National Environmental Education Foundation, headquartered in Washington, DC., and became its Vice President in 2006. Armstrong began his career with Toyota in 1992 as merchandising manager and was responsible for developing and implementing marketing programs targeting special markets based upon ethnicity, gender, lifestyle, and educational background. In 1998 he was appointed supplier diversity manager and promoted to national manager in January 2002. Armstrong developed the Supplier Diversity Department at TMS which included a Second Tier Supplier Diversity Program to ensure that TMS majority-owned suppliers utilized minority and woman-owned businesses. He also developed metrics and quarterly reporting systems to enable TMS to monitor its spending with minority and woman-owned business enterprises. In support of Toyota’s 21st Century Diversity Strategy, in 2002 Armstrong was appointed national manager of diversity and inclusion and given corporate liaison responsibility for minority advertising and marketing promotions, supplier diversity, community relations, and field operations. He was charged with developing a strategic diversity plan and was responsible for monitoring, augmenting, tracking, and supporting those processes that resulted in the organization’s ability to sustain a competitive advantage by leveraging diversity. Prior to joining Toyota, Armstrong worked as director of business affairs for Universal Television, MCA, Inc. negotiating agreements for the services of writers, directors, and producers in connection with television development and production. Armstrong earned a Bachelor of Science degree in business from Indiana University. He is an ordained minister with the African Methodist Episcopal Church. He serves on the ministerial staff of Rev. J. Edgar Boyd at First AME Church Los Angeles and began his ministry there under the leadership of the renowned Rev. Dr. Cecil Murray in 1990. Armstrong is past Vice Chair, External Affairs, of the Southern California Minority Supplier Development Council Board of Directors, and served on the Senior Corporate Executive Advisory Board of the United States Hispanic Chamber of Commerce in Washington, DC. Armstrong resides in West Los Angeles, California.
  23. 23. 21 Our authors study club Los Angeles branch of the association for the study of african american life and history, inc. 2014 honorary chair J.L. Armstrong National Manager, Corporate Affairs Toyota Motor Sales, U.S.A., Inc. Danny J. Bakewell, Sr. Executive Publisher / CEO Los Angeles Sentinel Carl A. Ballton President Union Bank Foundation Charisse Bremond Weaver President / CEO Brotherhood Crusade Laponza Butler President SEIU United Long Term Care Workers Judge Mablean Ephriam Television Personality Sandra Evers-Manly Northrop Grumman Foundation Belinda Fontenot-Jamerson Board President Museum of African American Art Kimberly Freeman Regional Director, Community Relations Southern California Gas Wendy Gladney President / CEO Personnel Services Plus Clifton L. Johnson Vice President (Ret.) Union Bank Randy Rice Executive Director, Educational Programs Farmer’s Insurance Group Francille Rusan Wilson, PhD Professor University of Southern California 2014 honorary committee CITY OF LOS ANGELES 2014 CELEBRATION Civil Rights in America
  24. 24. 22 Shanequa Gay, Quiet Strength of Jubilee, Oil on wood panel
  25. 25. 23 Our authors study club Los Angeles branch of the association for the study of african american life and history, inc. On September 9, 1915, Dr. Carter G. Woodson held a meeting in Chicago, Illinois with Alexander L. Jackson, Executive Secretary of the new Negro YMCA branch. In addition to Woodson and Jackson, three other men were present: George Cleveland Hall, W. B. Hartgrove, and J. E. Stamps. At this meeting they formed the Association for the Study of Negro Life and History (ASNLH) and appointed Dr. Woodson, Executive Director, a post he held until his death on April 3, 1950. Today, this organization is known as the Association for the Study of African American Life and History, Inc. (ASALH). Its headquarters is currently on campus at Howard University in Washington, DC. In Los Angeles, a group of Terminal Annex postal workers brought their proposal to read the works of African American authors and learn the true history of Africans in the Americas to Mrs. Vassie Davis Wright and Our Authors Study Club (OASC) was formed on February 14, 1945. Mrs. Wright recommended that the group affiliate with Dr. Woodson’s organization and Dr. Carter G. Woodson, himself, chartered Our Authors Study Club as the Los Angeles Branch of ASNLH in June 1945. OASC was incorporated as a California non-profit organization in 1946. Our Authors Study Club, Inc. (OASC) began citywide celebrations for what was Negro History Week in 1947. In 1950, Los Angeles Mayor Fletcher Bowron issued the first proclamation acknowledging Our Authors Study Club, Inc. as the primary sponsor of Negro History Week and invited citizens of Los Angeles to join the celebration. In 1959, while serving as General Chairperson for Negro History Week, the late Gilbert Lindsay, moved the Opening Ceremony to City Hall steps where the celebration now takes place every year, weather permitting. In the year of the nation’s Bicentennial, 1976, the celebration was expanded to the entire month of February and is now known as African American Heritage Month. OASC continues its original mission and now offers programs that include a Reading Program for elementary school students; an Oratorical Contest for high school students; scholarships for deserving college students seeking a Bachelor’s Degree; and a fellowship for Ph.D. candidates researching African American history, literature, and/or culture. Additional activities include an annual Tour of African American Landmarks in Los Angeles and the Dr. Carter G. Woodson Scholarship and Awards Luncheon where the accomplishments of extraordinary African Americans are recognized. Our Authors Study Club, Inc. also supports the restoration of Dr. Carter G. Woodson’s home in Washington, DC, now declared a National Historic Site, and partners with community organizations including the Black Hollywood Education and Resource Center (BHERC) and the Sigma Sigma Alumnae Chapter of Sigma Gamma Rho Sorority, Inc. For more information about the Association for the Study of African American Life and History, visit their website at asalh.org. Our Authors Study Club, Inc. is a non-profit 501 (c) (3) organization. For more information, write Our Authors Study Club, Inc. at Post Office Box 882025, Los Angeles, California 90009-3019. CITY OF LOS ANGELES 2014 CELEBRATION
  26. 26. 24 father of black history Founder of the Association for the study of African American Life and History Dr. Carter Godwin Woodson was born on December 19, 1875 in New Canton, Buckingham County, Virginia. His parents were former slaves Anne Eliza (Riddle) and James Henry Woodson. He died suddenly on April 3, 1950. He was the second African American to receive a Ph.D. degree from Harvard University (Dr. W.E.B. DuBois was the first). Dr. Woodson and four supporters organized the Association for the Study of Negro Life and History on Thursday, September 9, 1915 in the Wabash Avenue YMCA office located on the south side of Chicago, Illinois. His dream for ASALH was to archive sociological and historical data, publish books, promote the study of African American life and history, and encourage racial harmony through the organization and work of clubs and schools. In 1916, ASALH published the first issue of the “Journal of Negro History,” a highly respected and scholarly digest that was followed in 1937 by the “Negro History Bulletin,” a widely circulated historically oriented magazine. In 1920, Dr. Woodson founded the Associated Publishers, the for-profit arm of the Association. The Associated Publishers is responsible for the publication and circulation of ASALH’s renowned African American History Month Kits. Additionally, the Associated Publishers sells books and other literature authored by Dr. Woodson and other prominent scholars in the field of African American history. In February 1926, Dr. Woodson announced the institution of Negro History Week, which coincided with the birthdays of Abraham Lincoln and Frederick Douglass. In 1976, the observance was expanded to “National African American History Month,” in honor of the nation’s bicentennial. Beginning in 1975, U.S. Presidents have paid tribute to the mission of the Association and urged all Americans to celebrate African American History Month. Since 1926, ASALH has established the national theme for the month-long celebration of African American History Month. The Association maintains the Carter G. Woodson Home in Washington, D.C., where Woodson operated ASALH from 1923 until his death in 1950. The Woodson Home is a National Historic Landmark. The work of the organization has historically been to promote, research, preserve, interpret, and disseminate information about African American life, history, and culture to the global community. Dr. Carter Godwin Woodson association for the study of african american life and history, inc. ASALH asalh.org info@asalh.net
  27. 27. 25 founder of our authors study club, inc. los angeles branch of the association for the study of african american life and history, inc. Mrs. Vassie Davis Wright was born in Paola, Kansas on December 6, 1899, the daughter of Samuel William Davis and Lula Ann (Pertilla) Davis. She died on March 20, 1983, in Los Angeles, California. Her education was in the public schools of Denver. She graduated from Western University in Kansas City, Kansas and did her graduate work in Teaching at the University of Kansas. After arriving in California, she attended the University of Southern California Extension and completed courses in Sociology and Business Administration. Mrs. Wright became well known for her abilities as an organizer, socialite, and civic worker. Mrs. Wright and a group of Terminal Annex Postal Employees founded Our Authors Study Club, Inc. on February 14, 1945 for the purpose of studying the Biographies of African American authors, reviewing their books, and learning the true history of African people in the Diaspora. In June of 1945, Dr. Carter G. Woodson chartered the group to become members of his Association for the Study of African American Life and History, Inc. Mrs. Wright also helped to establish lending libraries in the YMCA, YWCA, and at the Second Baptist Church’s Henderson Community Center. Other notable achievements included the first citywide celebration of Negro History Week in Los Angeles and initiating a Black History curriculum in the Los Angeles Unified School District Adult Schools. Mrs. Wright was a real estate broker, a community activist, a Sigma Gamma Rho Sorority, Inc. member, and a very active member of Second Baptist Church. In addition, she was an organizing member of many community groups. In her will, Mrs. Wright left a fund to award fellowships to Ph.D. candidates doing research on African American life, literature, history, and/or culture. On June 5, 1985, the Los Angeles Jefferson Branch Library was renamed the “Jefferson-Vassie D. Wright Memorial Library.” The library is located at 2211 West Jefferson Boulevard, Los Angeles, California, 90018. mrs. vassie d. wright Our authors study club, Inc.
  28. 28. 26 Lee Ransaw, Bell & Feather, Mixed media
  29. 29. 27 AFRICAN AMERICAN HERITAGE MONTH OPENING CEREMONY WITH OUR AUTHORS STUDY CLUB, Inc. Join Mayor Eric Garcetti and Our Authors Study Club, Inc. to acknowledge the outstanding contributions of African Americans in our community. WHEN: February 11, 10:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m. WHERE: Los Angeles City Hall (South Lawn) 200 North Main Street, Los Angeles COST: Free SPONSORS: City of Los Angeles, Office of Mayor Garcetti, and Our Authors Study Club, Inc. INFO: ourauthorsstudyclub@gmail.com AN AFTERNOON WITH OUR AUTHORS, art, and smooth jazz Authors will feature their books and writings and will provide short presentations introducing their books. The books and other artworks will be available for purchase. WHEN: February 16, 2:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m. WHERE: Museum of African American Arts Baldwin Hills Crenshaw Plaza - Macy’s 3rd Floor, 4005 Crenshaw Blvd., Los Angeles COST: Free SPONSORS: Our Authors Study Club, Inc., Consolidated Realty INFO: ourauthorsstudyclub@gmail.com ANNUAL BLACK HISTORY MONTH ORATORICAL CONTEST This contest showcases students in grades 10 through 12 attending Los Angeles County high schools. The students will compete for scholarship prizes by reciting their speeches based on the 2014 African American History Month theme: “Civil Rights in America.” WHEN: March 19, 10:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m. WHERE: Lewis Metropolitan C.M.E. Church, 4900 South Western, Los Angeles COST : Free SPONSORS: Sigma Gamma Rho Sorority, Inc., Our Authors Study Club, Inc. INFO: ourauthorsstudyclub@gmail.com CITY OF LOS ANGELES 2014 CELEBRATION Our authors study club events
  30. 30. 28 Toni Scott, Roots, Ropes & Remembrance, Slavery in America, Digital and photography, 36” x 36”, 2010
  31. 31. 29 A Window to the World Dysonna City Art Gallery presents Alex Elena in an exhibit from Kenya, Africa. With a passion for photojournalism, Alex Elena hopes to take you through a journey. WHEN: Through February 22, 9:00 a.m. – 7:00 p.m. SITE: Dysonna City Art Gallery, 5373 Wilshire Blvd., Los Angeles COST: Free SPONSOR: Donna Dyson
 INFO: 323-857-0030, dysonnacityartgallery.com History of Jazz and Los Angeles’ Central Avenue This photo exhibit highlights the history of African American musicians and jazz clubs along Central Avenue in Los Angeles. WHEN: Through February 28, Mondays through Thursdays 10:00 a.m. – 8:00 p.m., Fridays and Saturdays 10:00 a.m. – 5:30 p.m., Sundays, 1:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m. SITE: Los Angeles Central Library, Central Library Rotunda, 630 W. 5th St., Los Angeles COST: Free SPONSOR: Teen’Scape Department INFO: 213-228-7224, lapl.org 201 North Figueroa Street, Suite 1400 Los Angeles, California 90012 TEL 213.202.5500 FAX 213.202.5513 WEB culturela.org CITY OF LOS ANGELES 2014 CELEBRATION COMMUNITY EVENTS
  32. 32. 30 Double Fortune, Double Trouble: Art for Twins among the Yoruba This exhibition explores the power and prevalence of “two-ness” in Yorùbá art and thought with an impressive display of more than 250 carved wood twin memorial figures, known as ere ibeji. The Yorùbá, who live in southwestern Nigeria as well as Togo and Benin, have one of the highest rates of twinning in the world, and special attention is paid to twins, both in life and after. These works from the Fowler’s extraordinary collection display a remarkable stylistic range and illuminate issues of apprenticeship and mastery, local innovation and invention, and how they were treated and transformed once they left the sculptors’ hands and moved into the hands, hearts, and minds of family members. WHEN: Through March 2; Wednesdays through Sundays 12:00 noon – 5:00 p.m., Thursdays 12:00 noon – 8:00 p.m. SITE: UCLA Fowler Museum, W. Sunset Blvd. and Westwood Plaza, Los Angeles COST: Free SPONSOR: UCLA Fowler Museum INFO: 310-825-4361, fowler.ucla.edu Powerful Bodies: Zulu Arts of Personal Adornment In nineteenth-century southern Africa, highly individualized arts of personal adornment experienced a florescence among isi-Zulu-speakers, people now called the Zulu. Personal objects worn on or carried around the body were made with considerable aesthetic investment and announced status and identity. Intimate objects like ivory hairpins and snuff spoons were worn in elaborate hairstyles; beautifully crafted snuff bottles were worn against the body, suspended from belts and necklaces; and finely sculpted staffs and clubs carried by all adult men were prized possessions. Men and women wore intricately sewn, jewel-colored beadwork to accentuate bodily “zones of power”: necklaces drew attention to the head; beaded fringes and belts highlighted the reproductive organs; and bracelets and anklets emphasized the hands and feet. Powerful Bodies includes seventy-nine fine examples of such objects, which were often imbued with the physical traces of their former users. WHEN: Through March 2; Wednesdays through Sundays 12:00 noon – 5:00 p.m., Thursdays 12:00 noon – 8:00 p.m. SITE: UCLA Fowler Museum, W. Sunset Blvd. and Westwood Plaza, Los Angeles COST: Free SPONSOR: UCLA Fowler Museum INFO: 310-825-4361, fowler.ucla.edu CITY OF LOS ANGELES 2014 CELEBRATION FEBRUARY Richard Procello, Expectations, Photography, 2006
  33. 33. 31 The March on Washington: A Tribute, 50 Years Later It is estimated that 250,000 men and women, black and white, young and old, traveled significant distances to converge on the Washington Monument Mall, and raise their voices in unity to demand jobs, freedom, and equality for all Americans. The August 28, 1963, March on Washington became a watershed moment in the struggle for Civil Rights. The California African American Museum celebrates this historical event with an exhibition featuring loaned items as well as artifacts and other ephemera from the museum’s history collection. WHEN: Through April 6, Tuesdays through Saturdays 10:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m., Sundays 11:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. SITE: California African American Museum, 600 State Dr., Exposition Park, Los Angeles COST: Free SPONSOR: California African American Museum INFO: 213-744-7432, caamuseum.org Soul Stirring: African American Self-Taught Artists from the South The late, renowned, self-taught artists honored in this important exhibition created stirring artworks with a variety of media. The exhibition includes the works of Leroy Almon who imbued his carvings with devout faith; Sam Doyle who painted Gullah history on cast-off roofing tin; Roy Ferdinand who illustrated graphic urban tableaux on posterboard; Clementine Hunter who rendered rich biographical paintings in oil; and others. The absence of formal training and lack of funds did not stifle the honorees’ creative spirits or diminish their commitments to their communities. The originality and intensity of their artworks vividly established their indelible contributions to American art. WHEN: Through April 6, Tuesdays through Saturdays 10:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m., Sundays 11:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. SITE: California African American Museum, 600 State Dr., Exposition Park, Los Angeles COST: Free SPONSOR: California African American Museum INFO: 213-744-7432, caamuseum.org Zeal Harris, Who’s the Mom?, Mixed media, 40” diameter, 2012
  34. 34. 32 Shaping Power: Luba Masterworks from the Royal Museum for Central Africa Shaping Power features Luba masterworks from the Democratic Republic of the Congo on loan from the Royal Museum for Central Africa and rarely seen outside of Belgium. Figurative thrones, elegant scepters, and ancestral figures actively contributed to the formation and expansion of a highly influential Luba state from the 18th to early 20th centuries. The exhibition includes a kneeling female figure holding a bowl by the celebrated artist known as the Buli Master, as well as the Royal Museum’s most iconic mask recalling the Luba culture hero - on loan for the first time ever. Shaping Power presents the richness and complexity of Luba arts, and lends insight into a world renowned African aesthetic and cultural legacy. WHEN: Through May 4, Mondays, Tuesdays, and Thursdays 11:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m., Fridays 11:00 a.m. – 8:00 p.m., Saturdays and Sundays 10:00 a.m. – 7:00 p.m. SITE: LACMA, Central Court, 5905 Wilshire Blvd., Los Angeles COST: $15 General, $10 Seniors and Students, Free Members and 17 & under SPONSOR: Los Angeles County Museum of Art INFO: 323-857-6000, lacma.org A Memoir in Movement: Carmen de Lavallade AND Geoffrey Holder This exhibition selectively surveys over half a century of prodigious artistic output of Carmen de Lavallade and Geoffrey Holder as actors, dancers, choreographers, teachers, directors, musicians, collectors, and designers. The show includes paintings, photographs, fashion dresses, show costumes and designs, books, and other treasures to offer museum visitors an intimate view into their artistic vision and accomplishments. WHEN: Through May 5, Tuesdays through Saturdays 10:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m., Sundays 11:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. SITE: California African American Museum, 600 State Dr., Exposition Park, Los Angeles COST: Free SPONSOR: California African American Museum INFO: 213-744-7432, caamuseum.org Question Bridge: Black Males Artists Chris Johnson, Hank Willis Thomas, Kamal Sinclair, and Bayeté Ross Smith collected question and answer videos from 150 men of different social, economic, political, and generational backgrounds to explore the full spectrum of what it means to be a “Black” and “male” in America. WHEN: Through June 15, Tuesdays through Saturdays 10:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m., Sundays 11:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. SITE: California African American Museum, 600 State Dr., Exposition Park, Los Angeles COST: Free SPONSOR: California African American Museum INFO: 213-744-7432, caamuseum.org CITY OF LOS ANGELES 2014 CELEBRATION FEBRUARY Benita Elliott, Abaro Ene, Photography, 16” x 20”, 2012
  35. 35. 33 Richard Procello, at top, Crenshaw Plaza, 1992, at bottom, Union Station, both, Photography
  36. 36. 34 Janet E. Dandridge, From the Cloud Series, Photography
  37. 37. 35 22nd Annual Pan African Film AND Arts Festival America’s largest black film festival showcasing over 150 new films from Africa, the United States, Europe, the Caribbean, the South Pacific, South America, and Canada. This event also features 100 black fine artists and craftspeople from the world over, poetry, fashion shows, free forums, and panels. WHEN: February 6 - 17, 10:00 a.m. – 12:00 midnight SITE: Rave Cinemas 15 at Baldwin Hills Crenshaw Plaza, 3650 W. Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd., Los Angeles COST: Varies by event SPONSOR: Pan African Film & Arts Festival INFO: 310-337-4737, PAFF.org Mindful Wellness Activities This series of health and wellness classes includes meditation and kundalini yoga in the morning, strength training and nutrition at 12:30 p.m., zumba at 2:00 p.m., Jazz dance at 3:00 p.m., acupuncture to induce cigarette, alcohol, and drug use cessation at 4:00 p.m. All are welcome. No one will be turned away for lack of funds. WHEN: February 8, 15, 9:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. SITE: The Village Health Foundation, 4073-75 W. Pico Blvd., Los Angeles COST: $5 donation per activity SPONSOR: The Village Health Foundation, Inc. INFO: 323-733-0771, villagehealthfoundation.org Toni Scott, Running Free, Digital rendering, 40” x 30”, 2009
  38. 38. 36 Black Inventors A look at early and present Black inventors who have contributed to the prosperity and well-being of the great nation of America. WHEN: February 11 – 28, 8:00 a.m. – 6:00 p.m. SITE: City of Los Angeles Over Bridge Gallery, 200 N. Spring St., Downtown Los Angeles COST: Free SPONSORS:  Office of the Council President Herb J. Wesson, Jr., Council Member 10th District; Office of Council Member Curren Price, 9th District; Office of Council Member Bernard Parks, 8th District; Office of Council Member Joe Buscaino, 15th District; Office of the Mayor Eric Garcetti; Los Angeles Professional Managers Association; and Los Angeles Association of Black Professionals INFO: 213-473-7010, herbwesson.com 8th Annual Trailblazers Reception The 2014 Trailblazers Reception recognizes individuals who have contributed to the progress of African Americans in City government and/or achieved notable positions in their City careers. WHEN: February 12, 5:30 p.m. – 7:30 p.m. SITE: Los Angeles City Hall, Tom Bradley Room, 200 N. Spring St., Downtown Los Angeles COST: Free SPONSOR: Los Angeles Association of Black Personnel INFO: 213-978-7254, laabp.org African American Storytime Learn about African American heritage at the library storytime. The event is suitable for toddlers to age 9 and their caregivers. WHEN: February 13, 4:00 p.m. SITE: Pico Union Branch Library, 1030 S. Alvarado St., Los Angeles COST: Free SPONSOR: Pico Union Branch Library INFO: 213-368-7545, lapl.org African Drumming, Song, and Dance This workshop features drumming techniques on traditional African drums along with presentation on African culture and audience participation on drumming and singing. WHEN: February 13, 4:00 p.m. SITE: Vermont Square Public Library, 1201 W. 48th St., Los Angeles COST: Free SPONSOR: Vermont Square Public Library INFO: 323-290-7405, lapl.org CITY OF LOS ANGELES 2014 CELEBRATION FEBRUARY Sharon Williams, Serene Photograph Series, Photography, 9” x 12”, 2010
  39. 39. 37 Educators’ Rollout: Tom Bradley Bridging the Divide Curriculum Guides Educators are invited to attend the premiere screening of Bridging the Divide: Tom Bradley and the Politics of Race, the educational version of Lyn Goldfarb’s and Alison Sotomayor’s comprehensive and compelling documentary on the life and career of Los Angeles’ longest tenured and first African American Mayor, Tom Bradley. An aligned education curriculum will be offered for elementary through high school to teachers in attendance. RSVP preferred at 213.744.2024. WHEN: February 13, 5:00 p.m. – 7:00 p.m. SITE: California African American Museum, 600 State Dr., Exposition Park, Los Angeles COST: Free SPONSOR: California African American Museum INFO: 213-744-7432, caamuseum.org James Brown: Get on the Good Foot, a Celebration in Dance The performance celebrates James Brown’s enormous worldwide influence and offers audiences a fresh perspective on the rich history of Harlem’s famed Apollo Theater. The project combines original dance and a musical score comprised of classic James Brown music and new contemporary compositions, performed by the Philadelphia Dance Company and featuring the work of innovative choreographers from Burkina Faso, the United States, Vietnam, and the United Kingdom. WHEN: February 14 – 16, Friday and Saturday 7:30 p.m., Sunday 2:00 p.m. SITE: Ahmanson Theatre, 135 N. Grand Ave., Downtown Los Angeles COST: Check website for prices SPONSOR: The Music Center INFO: 213-972-4396, musiccenter.org The Southern Migration West, California Dr. Angela James, Associate Professor of African American Studies at Loyola Marymount University will lecture on the 100-year migratory patterns of African Americans from the South to the Los Angeles area. She will highlight ways in which Southern culture and traditions influenced Los Angeles’ lifestyle. RSVP preferred 213.744.2024. WHEN: February 15, 2:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m. SITE: California African American Museum, 600 State Dr., Exposition Park, Los Angeles COST: Free SPONSOR: California African American Museum INFO: 213-744-7432, caamuseum.org Janet E. Dandridge, Growin’, Photography
  40. 40. 38 The Legacy of Abolitionism Panel on legacy of U.S. Abolitionist movement with Dr. Melina Abdulah, Chair of Pan-African Studies at the University of Los Angeles California State LA, and Ace Antonio Hall, actor and writer, will discuss the legacy of Abolitionism and the lessons that we can draw from the Abolitionist movement for today. WHEN: February 15, 3:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m. SITE: Palms-Rancho Park Library, 2920 Overland Ave., Los Angeles COST: Free SPONSORS: Los Angeles Public Library, National Endowment for the Humanities, Gilder Lehrman Institute INFO: 310-202-4583, lapl.org Mark Twain Branch Library Film Series This film series will showcase movies that star Sidney Poitier every Saturday. WHEN: February 15, 22, 1:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m. SITE: Mark Twain Branch Library, 9621 S. Figueroa St., Los Angeles COST: Free SPONSOR: Mark Twain Branch Library INFO: 323-755-4088, lapl.org Afro-Latino Heritage Festival As part of Target Free Sundays, the Museum of Latin American Art announces the Afro-American Chamber Ensemble. WHEN: February 16, 1:00 p.m. – 1:45 p.m. SITE: Museum of Latin American Art, 628 Alamitos Ave., Long Beach COST: Free SPONSOR: Target INFO: 310-671-6400, aacms.weebly.com CITY OF LOS ANGELES 2014 CELEBRATION FEBRUARY Janet E. Dandridge, Untitled, Photography
  41. 41. 39 Carter G. Woodson African American History Series 2014: Then and Now Black Power, Soul Power, Word Power The fiery and militant poetry of the Black Power Movement of the 1960s and 70s gave way for poets such as Amira Baraka, Don L. Lee, Nikki Giovanni, and others. We take a step back to revisit and juxtapose the poetry of “Black Pride” and “Black Power” written by wordsmiths 50 years ago. Then, take a step forward, as we present contemporary spoken word poetry calling for empowerment and progress in the current time. Featuring artist and educator, Ise Lyfe of HBO Def Poetry Jam. RSVP preferred 213.744.2024. WHEN: February 16, 2:00 p.m. SITE: California African American Museum, 600 State Dr., Exposition Park, Los Angeles COST: Free SPONSOR: California African American Museum INFO: 213-744-7432, caamuseum.org African American Stories and Paper Craft Storytelling featuring African Americans in history followed by a paper craft program. WHEN: February 18, 4:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m. SITE: Cahuenga Branch Library, 4591 Santa Monica Blvd., Los Angeles COST: Free SPONSOR: Cahuenga Branch Library INFO: 323-664-6418, lapl.org African American Crafts for Young Adults Join the library for a special African American craft program in honor of the African American heritage month. The event is suitable to ages10 and up. WHEN: February 19, 4:00 p.m. SITE: Pico Union Branch Library, 1030 S. Alvarado St., Los Angeles COST: Free SPONSOR: Pico Union Branch Library INFO: 213-368-7545, lapl.org Janet E. Dandridge, Follow These Rules: Periodic Table of Beauty
  42. 42. 40 The Impact of Music on the Civil Rights Movement by Dr. Lance Williams This lecture will be an ethnomusicology discussion that will center on the impact of music on the Civil Rights Movement. Dr. Lance Williams is the author of “The Anatomy of a Record Company” and “Legacy of Ray Anderson.” His current project is called “Blacks on Blues,” providing free public discussions of the impact of the blues on the history of America. WHEN: February 19, 6:30 p.m. – 7:45 p.m. SITE: Playa Vista Branch Library Community Room, 6400 Playa Vista Dr., Los Angeles COST: Free SPONSOR: Playa Vista Branch Library INFO: 310-437-6680, lapl.org Los Angeles Association of Black Per- sonnel African Marketplace The African Marketplace and Fashion Show features a wide range of vendors offering items such as clothing, food, designer jewelry, body oils, and framed paintings. WHEN: February 19 & 20, 10:00 a.m. – 2:00 p.m. SITE: Fletcher Bowron Square (Triforium), Temple St. between Main and Los Angeles Streets., Los Angeles COST: Free SPONSOR: Los Angeles Association of Black Personnel INFO: 213-978-7254, laabp.org Afro-American Chamber Music Society Orchestra A chamber music concert with the Afro-American Chamber Music Society Orchestra. WHEN: February 20, 12:00 noon – 1:00 p.m. SITE: USC Fisher Museum, USC Campus, 823 Exposition Blvd., Los Angeles COST: Free SPONSOR: Afro-American Chamber Music Society INFO: 310-671-6400, aacms.weebly.com CITY OF LOS ANGELES 2014 CELEBRATION FEBRUARY Kraig Blue, Let There Be Light...PUSH, Oil on canvas board, 24” x 30”, 2009
  43. 43. 41 African American Heritage Celebration This afternoon celebration includes poetry, storytelling, live gospel, jazz, and blues. African artifacts for sale, such as kente cloth, mud cloth, soapstone, handmade masks, and tribal earrings, add an authentic flavor to the event. WHEN: February 21, 2:00 p.m. - 4:00 p.m. SITE: Angelus Plaza, 255 S. Hill St., Downtown Los Angeles (4th floor Auditorium) COST: Free, Donations Accepted SPONSOR: Angelus Plaza INFO: 213-623-4352 x317 Roberta Flack Named one of VH1’s “100 Greatest Women of Rock & Roll,” songbird Roberta Flack blazed a trail of chart- topping tunes, including Feel Like Makin’ Love, The Closer I Get to You, Tonight I Celebrate My Love, and Set the Night to Music. Her Grammys for Killing Me Softly With His Song, The First Time Ever I Saw Your Face, and Where Is the Love cemented her status in the music industry. WHEN: February 21, 8:00 p.m. SITE: Cerritos Center for the Performing Arts, 12700 Center Court Dr., Cerritos COST: $58 - $82 SPONSOR: Cerritos Center for the Performing Arts INFO: 562-467-8818, cerritoscenter.com Zeal Harris, Land of Kecoughtan, Acrylic and poster paint pen on canvas, 20” x 24”, 2013
  44. 44. 42 Created Equal A public screening of the film “Freedom Riders” followed by a conversation to relate past struggles for freedom with current challenges that relate to the El Sereno community. WHEN: February 22, 1:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m. SITE: El Sereno Branch Library, 5226 Huntington Dr. S. Los Angeles COST: Free SPONSOR: El Sereno Branch Library INFO: 323-225-9201, lapl.org Jack DeJohnette, Joe Lovano, Esperanza Spalding, AND Leo Genovese: The Spring Quartet In the vibrant landscape of modern music, these four performers are powerful ambassadors of not only jazz, but of intersecting and evolving forms that reverberate across musical languages. They come together for a very special quartet configuration that showcases their shared artistic depth and individual breadth of influence. WHEN: February 22, 8:00 p.m. SITE: Center for the Art of Performance at UCLA, Royce Hall, 340 Royce Dr., West Los Angeles COST: $30 - $60, $15 UCLA students SPONSOR: Center for the Art of Performance at UCLA INFO: 310-825-2101, cap.ucla.edu CITY OF LOS ANGELES 2014 CELEBRATION FEBRUARY Toni Scott, Freedom, Wax, 25” x 30” x 25”, 2013
  45. 45. 43 African American Festival Join the Aquarium of the Pacific during its 12th annual African American Festival, celebrating African American and African cultures. The event features hip hop and break dancers, tap dancing, Mardi Gras second line dancers, jazz, interactive drum circles, West African dance, cultural storytelling, ethnic food, arts and crafts, and the Heritage Award ceremony. WHEN: February 22 & 23, 9:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. SITE: Aquarium of the Pacific, 100 Aquarium Way, Long Beach COST: $28.95 Adults, $25.95 Seniors, $14.95 Children (3 -11), Free children under 3 and Aquarium members SPONSOR: Aquarium of the Pacific INFO: 562-590-3100, aquariumofpacific.org Carter G. Woodson African American History Series 2014: Then and Now Institutional Power – The National Action Network and Media Advocacy The California African American Museum will examine and juxtapose traditional civil rights organizations against the role of social media in organizing people for social and political purposes. Rev. K.W. Tulloss will make a presentation on the National Action Network and its role in community action and advocacy. RSVP preferred 213.744.2024. WHEN: February 23, 12:00 noon – 2:00 p.m. SITE: California African American Museum, 600 State Dr., Exposition Park, Los Angeles COST: Free SPONSOR: California African American Museum INFO: 213-744-7432, caamuseum.org Duane Paul, Chaos (detail), Oil stick, gouache, collage/vellum/paper, acrylic, and spray paint on muslin backed paper, 141” x 63”, 1994
  46. 46. 44 Afro-American Chamber Music Society Orchestra A music concert with the Afro-American Chamber Music Society Orchestra. WHEN: February 23, 2:00 p.m. SITE: Vision Theatre, 3341 W. 43rd Pl., Los Angeles COST: Free SPONSOR: Afro-American Chamber Music Society INFO: 310-671-6400, aacms.weebly.com Outstanding African American Music In this vocal performance, patrons and library staff will sing together to share the beautiful spirituals of African American songs and to appreciate the richness of African heritage. WHEN: February 26, 4:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m. SITE: Vernon–Leon H Washington Jr. Memorial Branch Library, 4504 S. Central Ave., Los Angeles COST: Free SPONSOR: Vernon–Leon H Washington Jr. Memorial Branch Library INFO: 323-234-9106, lapl.org Bones and Blues Bones and Blues is a monthly concert series featuring live blues and jazz music, domino tournaments, and a hearty barbecue dinner. WHEN: February 28, 8:00 p.m. SITE: The Center, 10950 S. Central Ave., Los Angeles COST: $25 Door, $15 Pre-sale SPONSOR: Watts Labor Community Action Committee (WLCAC) INFO: 323-563-5639, wlcac.or CITY OF LOS ANGELES 2014 CELEBRATION FEBRUARY Duane Paul, Hope, Acrylic, spray paint, gesso, and oil stick on paper, 69” x 49”, 1994
  47. 47. 45 Toni Scott, Yes I am Native American Too, Black Indian Girl, Digital rendering, 40” x 30”, 2011
  48. 48. 46 Design by Yarn/Art Workshop #2 Second finger-knitting workshop facilitated by USC students as part of the CAAM/USC Roski School of Art and Design collaborative. Workshop projects may be included in the installation of the student showcase currently on view at CAAM. RSVP required 213.744.2024. WHEN: March 1, 12:00 noon – 2:00 p.m. SITE: California African American Museum, 600 State Dr., Exposition Park, Los Angeles COST: Free SPONSOR: California African American Museum INFO: 213-744-7432, caamuseum.org Mindful Wellness Activities This series of health and wellness classes includes meditation and kundalini yoga in the morning, strength training and nutrition at 12:30 p.m., zumba at 2:00 p.m., Jazz dance at 3:00 p.m., and acupuncture to induce cigarette, alcohol, and drug use cessation at 4:00 p.m. All are welcome. No one will be turned away for lack of funds. WHEN: March 1, 8, 15, 22 & 29, 9:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. SITE: The Village Health Foundation, 4073-75 W. Pico Blvd., Los Angeles COST: $5 donation per activity SPONSOR: The Village Health Foundation, Inc. INFO: 323-733-0771, villagehealthfoundation.org Mark Twain Branch Library Film Series Every Saturday, this film series will showcase movies adapted from books written by African American authors. WHEN: March 1, 8, 15, 2 & 29, 1:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m. SITE: Mark Twain Branch Library, 9621 S. Figueroa St., Los Angeles COST: Free SPONSOR: Mark Twain Branch Library INFO: 323-755-4088, lapo.org CITY OF LOS ANGELES 2014 CELEBRATION MARCH Bryan Tilford, Harry and Eldridge, Mixed media on canvas board, 20” x 24”
  49. 49. 47 I Got My Pride – The Blues Tales of Leadbelly The William Grant Still Arts Center’s 6th annual African American Composer’s series focuses on Huddie “Leadbelly” Ledbetter. The exhibition will feature albums, art, and archives of the life and work of Leadbelly also written as Lead Belly as well as his mentors and those he influenced. The African American Composers Series is accompanied by a music education program, teaching music to kids through the music of Leadbelly. WHEN: March 1 through June 14. Opening Exhibition March 1, 3:00 p.m. – 6:00 p.m., Gallery Hours Mondays through Sundays, 12:00 noon – 5:00 p.m. SITE: William Grant Still Arts Center, 2520 S. West View St., Los Angeles COST: Free SPONSOR: William Grant Still Arts Center INFO: 323-734-1165, wgsac.wordpress.com Target Sundays at CAAM – Women History Month Celebration The California African American Museum acknowledges the ongoing efforts and accomplishments of our beloved “Queens,” nationally and internationally. The exceptional performances will be dedicated to a singular theme - Women in Action! WHEN: March 2, 1:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m. SITE: California African American Museum, 600 State Dr., Exposition Park, Los Angeles COST: Free SPONSOR: California African American Museum INFO: 213-744-7432, caamuseum.org Caron Bowman, Unity (American Melting Pot Series)
  50. 50. 48 CITY OF LOS ANGELES 2014 CELEBRATION MARCH Mardi Gras A celebration of “Fat Tuesday” Olvera Street style with a children’s carnival. The event includes Brazilian singing and dancing, a festive parade, and mask making workshops. WHEN: March 4, 9:00 a.m. – 2:00 p.m. SITE: El Pueblo Historical Monument, 125 Paseo de la Plaza, Los Angeles COST: Free SPONSOR: El Pueblo Historical Monument INFO: 213-485-8372, calleolvera.com The True Story of an African American Legend This is the screening of the movie The True Story of an African American Legend. History was made in 1947, when Jackie Robinson broke the professional baseball race barrier to become the first African American Mayor League Baseball player of the modern era. WHEN: March 7, 3:00 p.m. – 5:15 p.m. SITE: Eagle Rock Branch Library, 5027 Caspar Ave., Los Angeles COST: Free SPONSOR: Eagle Rock Branch Library INFO: 323-258-8078, lapl.org Fusion: The Los Angeles LGBT People of Color Film Festival This is the only multi-cultural, gender-inclusive people of color film festival that spotlights the diversity of the LGBT community. WHEN: March 7 & 8, Times Vary SITE: The Egyptian Theatre, 6712 Hollywood Blvd., Hollywood COST: $13 SPONSOR: Outfest INFO: 213-480-7088, outfest.org Janet E. Dandridge, 33, Photography
  51. 51. 49 The Contested Murder of Latasha Harlins by Dr. Brenda E. Stevenson UCLA History professor and scholar, Dr. Stevenson, will speak on her latest book, in which she argues that the 1991 murder of 15-year-old Latasha Harlins in a store in South Central LA foreshadowed the tension in the Black community that would ultimately erupt after the acquittal of four LAPD officers involved in the beating of Rodney King only a few months later. EsoWon will be on site to sell books that Dr. Stevenson will sign. RSVP preferred 213.744.2024. WHEN: March 9, 2:00 p.m. SITE: California African American Museum, 600 State Dr., Exposition Park, Los Angeles COST: Free SPONSOR: California African American Museum INFO: 213-744-7432, caamuseum.org Design by Yarn/Art Workshop #3 Third finger-knitting workshop facilitated by USC students as part of the CAAM/USC Roski School of Art and Design collaboration. Results created in the workshop may be included in the installation of the student showcase currently on view at the museum. RSVP preferred 213.744.2024. WHEN: March 15, 12:00 noon - 2:00 p.m. SITE: California African American Museum, 600 State Dr., Exposition Park, Los Angeles COST: Free SPONSOR: California African American Museum INFO: 213-744-7432, caamuseum.org African American Self-Taught Artists from LACMA’s Permanent Collection Part of the California African American Museum’s ongoing programming related to its exhibition Soul Stirring: African American Self-Taught Artists from the South. Lecture to be presented by Franklin Sirmans, LACMA’s Contemporary Art Curator and Department Head. RSVP preferred 213.744.2024. WHEN: March 15, 2:00 p.m. SITE: California African American Museum, 600 State Dr., Exposition Park, Los Angeles COST: Free SPONSOR: California African American Museum INFO: 213-744-7432, caamuseum.org Duane Paul, Monica, Mixed media, 22” x 31” x 20”
  52. 52. 50 CITY OF LOS ANGELES 2014 CELEBRATION MARCH Norman Brown and Gerald Albright When Grammy-winning guitarist Norman Brown and Grammy-nominated saxophonist, Gerald Albright, teamed up for the Soul-Jazz album 24/7, they easily clinched the number one spot on the music charts. They bring their winning musical blend to Cerritos, performing songs from their collaboration and jointly concluding the show. WHEN: March 15, 8:00 p.m. SITE: Cerritos Center for the Performing Arts, 12700 Center Court Dr., Cerritos COST: $45 - $70 SPONSOR: Cerritos Center for the Performing Arts INFO: 562-467-8818, cerritoscenter.com The Artists’ Speak: Colorful Conversations Visual artist June Edmonds will share her life experiences and how she developed as a professional artist, her inspirations, and her current work. RSVP preferred 213.744.2024. WHEN: March 16, 2:00 p.m. SITE: California African American Museum, 600 State Dr., Exposition Park, Los Angeles COST: Free SPONSOR: California African American Museum INFO: 213-744-7432, caamuseum.org Napology: The Psychology of Black Hair A critical look at and discussion focused upon the historical framework that has shaped attitudes around hair in the African American community. Natural hair experts and stylists will make presentations. RSVP preferred 213.744-2024. WHEN: March 23, 2:00 p.m. SITE: California African American Museum, 600 State Dr., Exposition Park, Los Angeles COST: Free SPONSOR: California African American Museum INFO: 213-744-7432, caamuseum.org Bones and Blues Bones and Blues is a monthly concert series featuring live blues and jazz music, domino tournaments, and a hearty barbecue dinner. WHEN: March 28, 8:00 p.m. SITE: The Center, 10950 S. Central Ave., Los Angeles COST: $25 Door, $15 Pre-sale SPONSOR: Watts Labor Community Action Committee (WLCAC) INFO: 323-563-5639, wlcac.org Yrneh Brown, Freedom Calling, Mixed media, 7” x 11”, 2013
  53. 53. 51 June Edmonds, D.J., Oil on canvas, 12” x 24”, 2013
  54. 54. 52 Bryan Tilford, at left, Mo’ Fro, Acrylic on canvas board, 2013, at right, Sista’ Feelin’ Her Fro, Acrylic on canvas board, 12” x 16”, 2013
  55. 55. 53
  56. 56. 54 A TRIBUTE TO MARIE HARRIS THE SECOND ANNIVERSARY COMMEMORATING THE NAMING OF MARIE HARRIS SQUARE On February 18, 2012, the Inauguration Ceremony naming Marie Harris Square took place at the intersection of Van Nuys and Glenoaks Boulevards in Pacoima, California. The Motion to have this honor bestowed upon the Late Marie Harris was placed before the Los Angeles City Council by former City Councilman Richard Alarcon, seconded by Councilman Tony Cardenas, and passed unanimously. All those who knew Mrs. Harris were aware she was a fighter for her community and surrounding areas. She was one of three community activists who signed the San Fernando Valley cityhood study petition. She was all for improving the lives of fellow residents and doing things to better and beautify her community. “People of Diverse Cultures Uniting for Change” is the theme for Marie Harris Square and best describes what she wanted to see in the Northeast San Fernando Valley. Her heart and soul and passion for the community gave her the drive she needed to move forward with her vision of improving Pacoima. Marie was educated in the Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania school system where she received her high school diploma from Westinghouse High School. Shortly after graduating she met and married Alvin Harris. They had three children, Sidney Alvin, Rolene Marie, and Alton Keith Harris. In 1949 Marie moved with her family to Detroit, Michigan, where she began a distinguished career as a dress designer. She co-owned and operated the Boulevard House of Fashions boutique and was honored by the National Association of Fashion and Accessory Designers (NAFAD) for her design work. The Harris Family moved from Detroit to Pacoima, California in 1960. Marie continued her fashion career as Fashion Coordinator for NAFAD and spearheaded the unforgettable Designer’s Showcase at the Beverly Hills Hotel in l963 and 1964.
  57. 57. 55 Marie then turned her designer’s eye toward designing a community. As part of her community service, Marie: • Produced the first annual NAACP Image Awards Queen Contest • Co-Chaired the Sixth Annual NAACP Image Awards • Created and produced the Miss Teenage Image California Pageant and Male Teenage Image Revue at the Universal Sheraton Hotel in Universal City • Organized the Pacoima Property Owners Association to present the “Back to Pacoima and We Love It” Expo from 1980 to 1987 • Ran for Los Angeles City Council for the First District • Served as a Delegate to the California Democratic Party State Convention for ten years • Served as the First Vice-President of the Pacoima Chamber of Commerce • Taught Charm and Poise Classes at San Fernando High School, Fillmore Elementary School, and Sylmar Juvenile Hall • Served on the San Fernando Valley Vote Board Marie also served on many prestigious boards and committees including: the Senior Citizens Multi-purpose Center in Pacoima; Foothill Advisory Boosters Association; Assemblyman Robert Hertzberg Commission on Family, Children, and Senior Citizens; Olive View-UCLA Medical Center Foundation; Economic Alliance of San Fernando Valley; Unite LA; Urban Network for improving Training and Education in Los Angeles; Phoenix House Academy Community Advisory Committee; Hansen Dam Twin Lakes Grand Opening Celebration Steering Committee; and Heroes of Life, Inc. She also raised money for many charities including St John of God Hospital and Parks Chapel AME Church. As a devoted member of Lake View Terrace American Baptist Church, Marie Harris had a steadfast belief in the Heavenly Father and served the Lord faithfully. Marie also received numerous awards and proclamations and was recognized countless times by local, state, and federal government agencies. She was appointed Honorary Mayor of Pacoima and chosen “Woman of the Year” in both 1994 and 2004 by the California State Assembly. Community members, family, and friends will gather on February 18, 2014 at 4:00 p.m. to commemorate the second anniversary of the inauguration naming of Marie Harris Square at the intersection of Van Nuys and Glenoaks Boulevards.
  58. 58. 56 Teresa Tolliver, Tribal Spirit, Mixed media, 4” x 3”, 2013
  59. 59. 57 MARTIN LUTHER KING, JR // Early Readers HAPPY BIRTHDAY, DR. KING! Written by Kathryn Jones Illustrated by Floyd Cooper Publisher: Simon & Schuster After getting in trouble at school for fighting with another boy because he wanted to sit in the back of the bus, fourth-grader Jamal gets in trouble again at home when his Grandpa Joe learns about the scuffle. Grandpa Joe explains the story of Rosa Parks and the Montgomery bus boycott to help Jamal understand the history associated with sitting in the back of the bus. Jamal is so impressed with the story that he leads his class in a skit about the historic incident, which they stage in celebration of Martin Luther King’s birthday. MY DREAM OF MARTIN LUTHER KING Written and illustrated by Faith Ringgold Publisher: Crown The author tells the story of Martin Luther King, Jr. from the perspective of her own childhood dream. As her dream opens, she sees a world of people carrying bags full of prejudice, hate, ignorance, violence, and fear, and exchanges them for bags of hope, freedom, peace, awareness, and love. Her dreams reflect real and imagined glimpses of the life of Martin Luther King, Jr. to tell the story of his vision and civil rights leadership. By visualizing the story as the author tells it, young readers will be able to understand Dr. King’s mission. 2014 BIBLIOGRAPHY RECOMMENDED READING In celebration of African American Heritage Month, we present the following reading selections for elementary, middle, and high school readers. Bibliography compiled by: Gabriel Cifarelli City of Los Angeles Department of Cultural Affairs
  60. 60. 58 MARTIN LUTHER KING, JR / Middle Readers JUST LIKE MARTIN Written by Eleanora E. Tate Publisher: Just Us Young Stone is a member of his church’s youth group and a devoted follower of the nonviolent philosophies of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. When a racist’s bomb explodes in his Sunday school classroom, killing two of his friends, Stone demonstrates his commitment by organizing his peers for a controversial nonviolent children’s march. Stone must defy his father, who is much more militant, in this moving story set in the racially charged 1960s. MARTIN LUTHER KING Written by Rosemary L. Bray Illustrated by Malcah Zeldis Publisher: William Morrow The life and works of Martin Luther King, Jr. are captured in over-sized pages of text and bright folk art in this exceptional book. The text begins by covering Martin’s early life, when his childhood experiences began to shape his sensibilities. The major events of Martin’s life are touched upon, including the day he became aware of and embraced Gandhi’s philosophy of nonviolent protest, and his marriage to Coretta Scott. Every significant civil rights event during Martin’s adult life is detailed, framing a young reader’s understanding of the era and of King’s leadership role. MARTIN LUTHER KING, JR // High School Readers A TESTAMENT OF HOPE: THE ESSENTIAL WRITINGS AND SPEECHES OF MARTIN LUTHER KING, JR. Written by Martin Luther King, Jr. Edited by James Melvin Washington Publisher: Harper San Francisco An exhaustive collection of the speeches, writings, and interviews with the Nobel Prize-winning activist, this book contains Martin Luther King, Jr.’s essential thoughts on nonviolence, social policy, integration, black nationalism, the ethics of love, hope, and more. 2014 BIBLIOGRAPHY Toni Scott, Pickin Cotton, Slaves Times in America, Digital rendering, 40” x 40”, 2009
  61. 61. 59 CIVIL RIGHTS + SLAVERY // Early Readers A BAND OF ANGELS: A STORY INSPIRED BY THE JUBILEE SINGERS Written by Deborah Hopkinson Illustrated by Raúl Colón Publisher: Atheneum, Simon & Schuster This is the inspirational story of nine young people who in 1871 brought the Fisk School (later to become Fisk University) back from the brink of financial failure. Ella Sheppard, born into slavery in 1851, travels to Nashville after the emancipation to pursue her dream of attending Fisk. While there, she joins the choir. The group takes their show on the road, singing white songs to white audiences to try to earn money for the struggling school. Just when it seems that the school is going to fail, Ella decides to change the program leading her peers in rousing black spirituals from their slave heritage. The audiences are so moved by the soulful sounds that word spreads and the group, who become known as the Jubilee Singers, becomes an international sensation, saving the school from bankruptcy. GRANDDADDY’S GIFT Written by Margaree King Mitchell Illustrated by Larry Johnson Publisher: Bridge Water Little Joe lives through a life-changing experience when she witnesses her granddaddy’s stand against racial discrimination. Granddaddy is the first black to register to vote in their rural Mississippi town, and he and the family endure humiliation and threats from the townspeople as a result of his action. Little Joe’s love and respect for her granddaddy deepen as a result of the experience, but more importantly, Little Joe begins to appreciate the value of education and standing up for what is right. Richard Procello, First Dance, World Stage Dance Festival, Photography, 2006
  62. 62. 60 IF A BUS COULD TALK: THE STORY OF ROSA PARKS Written and Illustrated by Faith Ringgold Publisher: Houghton Mifflin In an imaginative biographical story, young Marcie boards a bus and experiences an eerie event. The bus has no driver, but it is full of riders who are celebrating Rosa Park’s birthday. The riders tell Marcie the story of Rosa’s life from childhood through the events that followed her courageous refusal to give up her seat on this very same bus. Marcie’s enlightening bus ride climaxes when she actually meets Mrs. Parks, leaving her with a full understanding of why Rosa Parks is known as the mother of the civil rights movement. TO BE A DRUM Written by Evelyn Coleman Illustrated by Aminah Brenda Lynn Robinson Publisher: Albert Whitman Young Matt and Martha’s daddy tells them about their African ancestors who were so in tune with the earth that they captured its beat and translated it through their bodies onto their drums. When they were torn from their land and brought into slavery, their drums were taken away. But the people never lost their beat. Richly textured mixed-media paintings embellish the thought-provoking message. CIVIL RIGHTS + SLAVERY // Middle Readers THE CAPTIVE Written by Joyce Hansen Publisher: Scholastic Kofi, a West African prince, is betrayed by a fellow countryman and stolen away from his family, friends, and Sierra Leone homeland by a slave trader in 1788. Young readers travel with him from the time of his terrifying bondage and voyage over the Atlantic in a slave ship to his landing in America, where he is sold. LIFT EVERY VOICE AND SING Written by James Weldon Johnson Illustrated by Elizabeth Catlett Publisher: Walker Books for Young Readers Written by civil rights leader and poet James Weldon Johnson in 1899, “Lift Ev’ry Voice and Sing” is sung in schools and churches throughout America. The popular, timeless song is recognized as a testimonial to the struggle and achievements of African American people - past, present, and future. Bryan Tilford, Smith and Carlos, Mixed media on canvas board, 12” x 16” 2014 BIBLIOGRAPHY
  63. 63. 61 Christine Brannon Nelson, both top and bottom, The Search for Peace, at top, Oil on canvas, at bottom, Watercolor on paper
  64. 64. 62 MANY THOUSANDS GONE: AFRICAN AMERICANS FROM SLAVERY TO FREEDOM Written by Virginia Hamilton Illustrated by Leo and Diane Dillon Publisher: Knopf, Random House Thirty-four brief, true stories about slavery are powerfully told. Each story relates a small piece of the historical truth about slavery. This book would make a fine classroom text or can be shared with your child to raise his or her awareness of what has gone before. NEXT STOP FREEDOM: THE STORY OF A SLAVE GIRL Written by Dorothy and Thomas Hoobler and Carey-Greenberg Associates Illustrated by Cheryl Hanna Publisher: Silver Burdett, Simon & Schuster Young Emily, a slave, dreams of freedom as she learns to read and write. Emily has heard about the Moses who led slaves to freedom. One night, Moses does come to escort her and others to freedom on the Underground Railroad. After a long and suspenseful trip, with slave catchers on their heels, the group is hidden by a Quaker family and then sent on to freedom in Pennsylvania. Shanequa Gay, Reverence, Oil on wood panel 2014 BIBLIOGRAPHY
  65. 65. 63 OH, FREEDOM!: KIDS TALK ABOUT THE CIVIL RIGHTS MOVEMENT WITH THE PEOPLE WHO MADE IT HAPPEN Written by Casey King and Linda Barrett Osborne Illustrated by Joe Brooks Publisher: Knopf, Random House Kids conduct thirty-one interviews with adult friends, family members, and civil rights activists to learn firsthand about the days of the 1960s civil rights movement. Informative chapters thoroughly explore the Jim Crow era, non-violence, black power, and segregation. Three essays, and an important foreword by Rosa Parks, provide background information on various aspects of the era to help add perspective to the interviews. THE YEAR THEY WALKED: ROSA PARKS AND THE MONTGOMERY BUS BOYCOTT Written by Beatrice Siegel Publisher: Four Winds, Simon & Schuster Rosa Parks’ heroic act of nonviolent resistance, when she refused to give up her seat to a white rider on a bus, sparked the most widely watched civil rights demonstration in the history of the United States. A highly accessible, non-fiction account of the Montgomery bus boycott, this book describes in complete detail the call from black civic leaders to the African American community to unite for the boycott, and the strategies that the community used to hold their position for over a year, until they prevailed. CIVIL RIGHTS + SLAVERY // High School Readers THE BONDWOMAN’S NARRATIVE Written by Hannah Crafts; Edited by Henry Louis Gates, Jr. Publisher: Warner Books This novel was discovered some years ago, by distinguished Harvard professor Henry Louis Gates, Jr. in an auction catalog. Gates realized that the novel, if genuine, would be the first novel known to have been written by a black woman in America, as well as the only one by a fugitive slave. He bought the manuscript (there was no competing bid) and began the exhilarating task of confirming the racial identity of the author and the approximate date of composition (circa 1855-59). Gates describes this detective work in the introduction to The Bondwoman’s Narrative. He also proposes a couple of candidates for authorship, assuming that Hannah Crafts was the real or assumed name of the author, and not solely a pen name. If Gates is right (his introduction and appendix should convince just about everyone), The Bondwoman’s Narrative is a tremendous discovery, and is well worth reading on literary and historical grounds. As Gates argues, these pages provide our first “unedited, unaffected, unglossed, unaided” glimpse into the mind of a fugitive slave. Dolores Johnson, Girl with Doll, Oil on board, 11” x 14”
  66. 66. 64 INVISIBLE MAN Written by Ralph Ellison Publisher: Random House Invisible Man is a nightmarish novel of a man trying to comprehend the confusion of myth, experience, and inner reactions that control his life. The nameless narrator describes growing up in a black community in the South, attending a Negro college from which he is expelled, moving to New York and becoming the chief spokesman of the Harlem branch of “the Brotherhood,” and retreating amid violence and confusion to the basement lair of the Invisible Man he imagines himself. NARRATIVE OF THE LIFE OF FREDERICK DOUGLASS, AN AMERICAN SLAVE: WRITTEN BY HIMSELF Written by Frederick Douglass Publisher: Yale University Press Frederick Douglass was born a slave on a Maryland plantation, but learned to read. Mistreated because he knew too much, he finally escaped from slavery and gained fame as an orator. Published in 1845, just seven years after his escape from slavery, this book provides students with an accessible introduction to the work of Frederick Douglass, as well a vivid first-hand account of life as a slave. Students interested in pursuing the subject are encouraged to read his later autobiography, The Life and Times of Frederick Douglass, published in 1881. Caron Bowman, Eternal Love
  67. 67. 65 NATIVE SON Written by Richard Wright Publisher: Harper Perennial Native Son deals with the problems an African American has attaining manhood in a society that conspires against him. The story begins by showing the difficulty of achieving normal human relations in the squalor of a Chicago slum. Bigger Thomas has what appears to be amazing luck when he gets a job as a chauffeur with a wealthy family. However, in fear and confusion, he accidentally kills the daughter. He tries to escape, but is caught and tried for murder. The events seem to be a long nightmare over which Bigger himself has little or no control. UP FROM SLAVERY Written by Booker T. Washington Publisher: Doubleday Born in 1856, this autobiography describes Washington’s struggles, after the emancipation, to gain an education and found Tuskegee Institute. This addition also includes selections from other slave narratives. LIFE + CULTURE / Early Readers THE BAT BOY AND HIS VIOLIN Written by Gavin Curtis Illustrated by E. B. Lewis Publisher: Simon and Schuster Young Reginald is a consummate musician who would rather play his violin than do anything else, much to his father’s chagrin. His father, who manages the Dukes, a losing team in the Negro National Baseball League, decides to recruit Reginald as a bat boy for the team. Reginald is a disaster as a bat boy, but the team finds his violin music inspirational. As Reginald plays the music of Mozart, Beethoven, and Bach in the dugout during the games, the team begins to perform to new heights. Finally, the Dukes are in the position to win a pennant against the hottest team in the league. Win or lose, Reginald has made a difference, earning the respect of the team and the gratitude of his father. June Edmonds, Patrick Spills, Oil on canvas, 30” x 42”, 2013 2014 BIBLIOGRAPHY
  68. 68. 66 EXPLORE BLACK HISTORY WITH WEE PALS Written and Illustrated by Morrie Turner Publisher: Just Us The Wee Pals, comic-strip characters who first appeared in Ebony and Black World magazines in 1964, are the vehicle for delivering a dose of African American history to young readers. The accomplishments of over seventy prominent African Americans from all walks of life, including Angela Davis, Jesse Jackson, Thurgood Marshall, and James Farmer, are discussed by the Wee Pals in a series of short comic strips. The format and brevity of each vignette are sure to attract young readers. I LOVE MY HAIR! Written by Natashia Anastasia Tarpley Illustrated by E. B. Lewis Publisher: Little, Brown Young Keyana is totally satisfied with her head of thick, soft hair. Even as she endures the sometimes painful combing and brushing process, she understands that her hair is special. It can be woven, braided, or beaded into beautiful styles that she loves, which fills her with pride. READ FOR ME, MAMA Written by Vashanti Rahaman Illustrated by Lori McElrath-Eslick Publisher: Boyds Mills This sensitive story about a hard-working single mother and her loving son will touch young readers. Joseph loves to read and checks two books out of the library – one that can read by himself and another, more difficult one for his Mama to read to him. But every day Mama has a reason to avoid reading. On Mondays there was grocery shopping to do; on Tuesday, housecleaning; on Wednesday... SOMETHING BEAUTIFUL Written by Sharon Dennis Wyeth Illustrated by Chris K. Soentpiet Publisher: Doubleday A young girl searches for something beautiful in her inner-city neighborhood, surrounded by graffiti, homelessness, broken glass, and trash. Through her neighbors she begins to recognize the small things in life that are beautiful such as good meals, friends, a small neighborhood garden, and the special love of her mother. Her mother has no trouble seeing the beauty in her own child, whose beaming face is seen on the book’s cover. SOMEWHERE IN AFRICA Written by Ingrid Mennen and Niki Daly Illustrated by Nicolaas Maritz Publisher: Puffin Unicorn, Puffin A young boy named Ashraf lives in Africa, but not the Africa that might come to mind when young readers think about that continent. Ashraf’s home is a big city teeming with skyscrapers, bustling with cars, and alive with the energy of any large metropolitan area. Ashraf’s only view of the wilder side of Africa comes from books, whose pictures of lions, zebras, and crocodiles fascinate him. A young reader’s vision of Africa will broaden with the new knowledge that Africa has more than jungles and wild animals. Richard Procello, Carmel, Photography 2014 BIBLIOGRAPHY
  69. 69. 67 LIFE + CULTURE // Middle Readers COMING TOGETHER: CELEBRATIONS FOR AFRICAN AMERICAN FAMILIES Written by Harriette Cole Illustrated by John Pinderhughes Publisher: Jump At The Sun African American families are dynamic and powerful. Celebrations play an important part in the fabric of the family. Coming Together is devoted to several of the very special occasions that many African American families honor. Filled with creative ideas for involving the entire family – from young children to grandparents and great-grandparents – this rich book provides everything you need to transform time together into compelling and memorable occasions. Coming Together is brimming with sample menus, easy-to-follow recipes, crafts, activities, and unique ideas to bring the value of these celebrations to life. THE EDUCATION OF MARY: A LITTLE MISS OF COLOR, 1832 Written by Ann Rinaldi Publisher: Jump At The Sun In 1832, Prudence Crandall, a Quaker educator in Connecticut, closed her Canterbury Female Seminary and reopened it as a school for young black women. This novel revolves around the formation of that school and the storm of controversy it created in town. Many historical forces come into play here: the abolitionist movement, endemic prejudice against free blacks, and the brutality of the early factory system. HER STORIES: AFRICAN AMERICAN FOLKTALES, FAIRY TALES, AND TRUE TALES Written by Virginia Hamilton Illustrated by Leo and Diane Dillon Publisher: Scholastic Nineteen stories are expertly told about black female folk and fairy characters. This enticing work is dedicated to mothers, grandmothers, and aunts, who have often been the bearers of such stories from generation to generation. Each story is exquisitely illustrated and is punctuated with a short commentary that adds insight into the nature and origin of the tale. Mature children, especially your daughters, will love this immediate classic. (Nonstandard English) THE MIDDLE OF SOMEWHERE: A STORY OF SOUTH AFRICA Written By Shiela Gordon Publisher: Orchard, Grolier Young Rebecca, who lives in a black township in South Africa, is afraid of being forced out of her home. The government wants to relocate her family and neighbors to a less developed area in order to accommodate expansion for white suburbanites. The villagers protest the attempts to move them, and Rebecca’s father is arrested after a community-wide demonstration. The evils of apartheid come through strongly in this novel of a family’s determination to stay together. Ronald Jackson, Goddess III
  70. 70. 68 REFLECTIONS OF A BLACK COWBOY: THE BUFFALO SOLDIERS Written by Robert Miller Illustrated by Richard Leonard Publisher: Silver Burdett, Simon & Schuster The stories of the African American Buffalo Soldiers, who served in the Ninth and Tenth Cavalries in the nineteenth century, are colorfully told in this entertaining book narrated by Old Cowboy. The Buffalo Soldiers played an important role in opening up the western frontier, yet their stories are not well known. In this book of five short stories, several of these brave soldiers are acknowledged for their historic achievements and battles. The Reflections of a Black Cowboy series also includes a volume on pioneers, as well as one on cowboys and one on mountain men. STORYTELLER’S BEADS Written by Jane Kurts Publisher: Gulliver, Harcourt Brace Two girls, Sahay and Rachel, are bonded together during their brave journey from their Ethiopian homeland to the Sudan, where they hope to find peace and food. The story takes place during the Ethiopian famine of the 1980s, a time when millions were dying of starvation and internal warfare. The two girls – one Jewish, one Christian – ultimately find that they have more in common than not, once they overlook their different ethnic upbringings and customs, superstitions, and traditions of two distinctly different Ethiopian groups. This book will appeal to young readers of historical fiction. Richard Procello, Black Cowboys, Bill Pickett Rodeo, Photography, 1985
  71. 71. 69 LIFE + CULTURE // High School Readers THE COLOR PURPLE Written by Alice Walker Publisher: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich Celie is a poor black woman whose letters tell the story of 20 years of her life, beginning at age 14 when she is being abused and raped by her father and attempting to protect her sister from the same fate, and continuing over the course of her marriage to “Mister,” a brutal man who terrorizes her. Celie eventually learns that her abusive husband has been keeping her sister’s letters from her and the rage she feels, combined with an example of love and independence provided by her close friend Shug, pushes her finally toward an awakening of her creative and loving self. THEIR EYES WERE WATCHING GOD Written by Zora Neale Hurston Publisher: University of Illinois Press Fair and long-legged, independent and articulate, Janie Crawford sets out to be her own person – no mean feat for a black woman in the ‘30s. Janie’s quest for identity takes her through three marriages and into a journey back to her roots. SONG OF SOLOMON Written by Toni Morrison Publisher: Knopf Song of Solomon explores the quest for cultural identity through an African American folktale about enslaved Africans who escape slavery by fleeing back to Africa. The novel tells the story of Macon “Milkman” Dead, a young man alienated from himself and estranged from his family, his community, and his historical and cultural roots. Author Toni Morrison, long renowned for her detailed imagery, visual language, and “righting” of black history, guides the protagonist along a 30-year journey that enables him to reconnect with his past and realize his self-worth. YELLOW BACK RADIO BROKE-DOWN Written by Ishmael Reed Publisher: Avon Ishmael Reed has put together a collage of American pop culture, ancient Egyptian mythology, and voodoo ideals which becomes, in the reader’s mind, either an incomprehensible mess or hilarious satire. Yellow Back Radio Broke-Down is a novel about a black, voodoo cowboy, Loop Garoo, and his exciting adventures. It is a satire on the Western, and the American values that made the Western popular. SOURCES: Amazon.com, www.amazon.com Bloom, Harold, Ed. Major Black American Writers Through the Harlem Renaissance. New York: Chelsea House, 1995 Bloom, Harold, Ed. Major Modern Black American Writers. New York: Chelsea House, 1995 Rand, Donna and Toni Trent Parker, and Sheila Foster, Eds. Black Books Galore! Guide to Great African American Children’s Books. New York: John Wiley and Sons Inc, 1998 Rand, Donna and Trent Parker. Black Books Galore! More Great African American Children’s Books. New York: John Wiley and Sons Inc, 2001 Stanford, Barbara Dodds and Karima Amin, Eds. Illinois: National Council of Teachers of English, 1978 2014 BIBLIOGRAPHY
  72. 72. 70 Toni Scott, Earth, Stone Carving, Chlorite, 2011
  73. 73. 71 Literary Artists The Department of Cultural Affairs is pleased to present the works of four fine writers for the 2014 African American Heritage Month Calendar and Cultural Guide. We are honored to showcase the work of Los Angeles poets Cherise “Reese” Charleswell, Amoke, C. Jerome Woods, and Valerie Ayres. CITY OF LOS ANGELES 2014 CELEBRATION
  74. 74. 72 My Black Is Ohhh so beautiful... I’m talking honey-brown amber hue thick thighs slightly almond-shaped eyes bee stung lips high derrière and round hips. Ohhh wee I look in the mirror and I LOVE what I see. Yes, every morsel of this brown sugar is enough to put an unsuspecting individual into a diabetic coma in need of insulin, because of the beauty manifested through extra doses of melanin. I’m talking about the full array of Black and Beautiful complexions. Deep dark chocolate mahogany...ebony to the siennas...mochas...cinnamon caramels butter pecans and cafe au lait. Our Black is truly beautiful. Beautiful B l a c kBy Cherise “Reese” Charleswell
  75. 75. 73 One I AM THE ONLY ONE IN EXISTENCE… I AM EVERYONE AND EVERYTHING YOU SEE… THERE IS NO END…THERE’S NO BEGINNING… I JUST KEEP RE-CREATING ME…ONE LIFE… ONE POWER…ONE MIND…ONE PRESENCE… SO I AM SURE THAT YOU CAN SEE…THAT I AM TRUTH… AND I AM SPIRIT…AND WHAT YOU DO UNTO OTHERS… YOU ALSO DO UNTO ME…I AM RED…YELLOW…BROWN… BLACK…AND WHITE…FOR I CREATE MYSELF IN EVERY HUE… I AM STRAIGHT…GAY…BI…TRANSGENDERED…I AM ASEXUAL SOMETIMES TOO…I EXPRESS…REVEAL MYSELF IN MANY WAYS… I AM THE OCEAN DEEP…THE MOUNTAIN HIGH…THE SUN AND ALL ITS RAYS…OMNISCIENT…OMNIPOTENT…OMNIPRESENT… I AM THE ONLY REALITY…I AM A PART OF ALL OF YOU… AND YOU ARE ALL A PART OF ME…ONE! By Amoke

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