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2013 African American Heritage Month Cultural Affairs Guide Los Angeles
2013 African American Heritage Month Cultural Affairs Guide Los Angeles
2013 African American Heritage Month Cultural Affairs Guide Los Angeles
2013 African American Heritage Month Cultural Affairs Guide Los Angeles
2013 African American Heritage Month Cultural Affairs Guide Los Angeles
2013 African American Heritage Month Cultural Affairs Guide Los Angeles
2013 African American Heritage Month Cultural Affairs Guide Los Angeles
2013 African American Heritage Month Cultural Affairs Guide Los Angeles
2013 African American Heritage Month Cultural Affairs Guide Los Angeles
2013 African American Heritage Month Cultural Affairs Guide Los Angeles
2013 African American Heritage Month Cultural Affairs Guide Los Angeles
2013 African American Heritage Month Cultural Affairs Guide Los Angeles
2013 African American Heritage Month Cultural Affairs Guide Los Angeles
2013 African American Heritage Month Cultural Affairs Guide Los Angeles
2013 African American Heritage Month Cultural Affairs Guide Los Angeles
2013 African American Heritage Month Cultural Affairs Guide Los Angeles
2013 African American Heritage Month Cultural Affairs Guide Los Angeles
2013 African American Heritage Month Cultural Affairs Guide Los Angeles
2013 African American Heritage Month Cultural Affairs Guide Los Angeles
2013 African American Heritage Month Cultural Affairs Guide Los Angeles
2013 African American Heritage Month Cultural Affairs Guide Los Angeles
2013 African American Heritage Month Cultural Affairs Guide Los Angeles
2013 African American Heritage Month Cultural Affairs Guide Los Angeles
2013 African American Heritage Month Cultural Affairs Guide Los Angeles
2013 African American Heritage Month Cultural Affairs Guide Los Angeles
2013 African American Heritage Month Cultural Affairs Guide Los Angeles
2013 African American Heritage Month Cultural Affairs Guide Los Angeles
2013 African American Heritage Month Cultural Affairs Guide Los Angeles
2013 African American Heritage Month Cultural Affairs Guide Los Angeles
2013 African American Heritage Month Cultural Affairs Guide Los Angeles
2013 African American Heritage Month Cultural Affairs Guide Los Angeles
2013 African American Heritage Month Cultural Affairs Guide Los Angeles
2013 African American Heritage Month Cultural Affairs Guide Los Angeles
2013 African American Heritage Month Cultural Affairs Guide Los Angeles
2013 African American Heritage Month Cultural Affairs Guide Los Angeles
2013 African American Heritage Month Cultural Affairs Guide Los Angeles
2013 African American Heritage Month Cultural Affairs Guide Los Angeles
2013 African American Heritage Month Cultural Affairs Guide Los Angeles
2013 African American Heritage Month Cultural Affairs Guide Los Angeles
2013 African American Heritage Month Cultural Affairs Guide Los Angeles
2013 African American Heritage Month Cultural Affairs Guide Los Angeles
2013 African American Heritage Month Cultural Affairs Guide Los Angeles
2013 African American Heritage Month Cultural Affairs Guide Los Angeles
2013 African American Heritage Month Cultural Affairs Guide Los Angeles
2013 African American Heritage Month Cultural Affairs Guide Los Angeles
2013 African American Heritage Month Cultural Affairs Guide Los Angeles
2013 African American Heritage Month Cultural Affairs Guide Los Angeles
2013 African American Heritage Month Cultural Affairs Guide Los Angeles
2013 African American Heritage Month Cultural Affairs Guide Los Angeles
2013 African American Heritage Month Cultural Affairs Guide Los Angeles
2013 African American Heritage Month Cultural Affairs Guide Los Angeles
2013 African American Heritage Month Cultural Affairs Guide Los Angeles
2013 African American Heritage Month Cultural Affairs Guide Los Angeles
2013 African American Heritage Month Cultural Affairs Guide Los Angeles
2013 African American Heritage Month Cultural Affairs Guide Los Angeles
2013 African American Heritage Month Cultural Affairs Guide Los Angeles
2013 African American Heritage Month Cultural Affairs Guide Los Angeles
2013 African American Heritage Month Cultural Affairs Guide Los Angeles
2013 African American Heritage Month Cultural Affairs Guide Los Angeles
2013 African American Heritage Month Cultural Affairs Guide Los Angeles
2013 African American Heritage Month Cultural Affairs Guide Los Angeles
2013 African American Heritage Month Cultural Affairs Guide Los Angeles
2013 African American Heritage Month Cultural Affairs Guide Los Angeles
2013 African American Heritage Month Cultural Affairs Guide Los Angeles
2013 African American Heritage Month Cultural Affairs Guide Los Angeles
2013 African American Heritage Month Cultural Affairs Guide Los Angeles
2013 African American Heritage Month Cultural Affairs Guide Los Angeles
2013 African American Heritage Month Cultural Affairs Guide Los Angeles
2013 African American Heritage Month Cultural Affairs Guide Los Angeles
2013 African American Heritage Month Cultural Affairs Guide Los Angeles
2013 African American Heritage Month Cultural Affairs Guide Los Angeles
2013 African American Heritage Month Cultural Affairs Guide Los Angeles
2013 African American Heritage Month Cultural Affairs Guide Los Angeles
2013 African American Heritage Month Cultural Affairs Guide Los Angeles
2013 African American Heritage Month Cultural Affairs Guide Los Angeles
2013 African American Heritage Month Cultural Affairs Guide Los Angeles
2013 African American Heritage Month Cultural Affairs Guide Los Angeles
2013 African American Heritage Month Cultural Affairs Guide Los Angeles
2013 African American Heritage Month Cultural Affairs Guide Los Angeles
2013 African American Heritage Month Cultural Affairs Guide Los Angeles
2013 African American Heritage Month Cultural Affairs Guide Los Angeles
2013 African American Heritage Month Cultural Affairs Guide Los Angeles
2013 African American Heritage Month Cultural Affairs Guide Los Angeles
2013 African American Heritage Month Cultural Affairs Guide Los Angeles
2013 African American Heritage Month Cultural Affairs Guide Los Angeles
2013 African American Heritage Month Cultural Affairs Guide Los Angeles
2013 African American Heritage Month Cultural Affairs Guide Los Angeles
2013 African American Heritage Month Cultural Affairs Guide Los Angeles
2013 African American Heritage Month Cultural Affairs Guide Los Angeles
2013 African American Heritage Month Cultural Affairs Guide Los Angeles
2013 African American Heritage Month Cultural Affairs Guide Los Angeles
2013 African American Heritage Month Cultural Affairs Guide Los Angeles
2013 African American Heritage Month Cultural Affairs Guide Los Angeles
2013 African American Heritage Month Cultural Affairs Guide Los Angeles
2013 African American Heritage Month Cultural Affairs Guide Los Angeles
2013 African American Heritage Month Cultural Affairs Guide Los Angeles
2013 African American Heritage Month Cultural Affairs Guide Los Angeles
2013 African American Heritage Month Cultural Affairs Guide Los Angeles
2013 African American Heritage Month Cultural Affairs Guide Los Angeles
2013 African American Heritage Month Cultural Affairs Guide Los Angeles
2013 African American Heritage Month Cultural Affairs Guide Los Angeles
2013 African American Heritage Month Cultural Affairs Guide Los Angeles
2013 African American Heritage Month Cultural Affairs Guide Los Angeles
2013 African American Heritage Month Cultural Affairs Guide Los Angeles
2013 African American Heritage Month Cultural Affairs Guide Los Angeles
2013 African American Heritage Month Cultural Affairs Guide Los Angeles
2013 African American Heritage Month Cultural Affairs Guide Los Angeles
2013 African American Heritage Month Cultural Affairs Guide Los Angeles
2013 African American Heritage Month Cultural Affairs Guide Los Angeles
2013 African American Heritage Month Cultural Affairs Guide Los Angeles
2013 African American Heritage Month Cultural Affairs Guide Los Angeles
2013 African American Heritage Month Cultural Affairs Guide Los Angeles
2013 African American Heritage Month Cultural Affairs Guide Los Angeles
2013 African American Heritage Month Cultural Affairs Guide Los Angeles
2013 African American Heritage Month Cultural Affairs Guide Los Angeles
2013 African American Heritage Month Cultural Affairs Guide Los Angeles
2013 African American Heritage Month Cultural Affairs Guide Los Angeles
2013 African American Heritage Month Cultural Affairs Guide Los Angeles
2013 African American Heritage Month Cultural Affairs Guide Los Angeles
2013 African American Heritage Month Cultural Affairs Guide Los Angeles
2013 African American Heritage Month Cultural Affairs Guide Los Angeles
2013 African American Heritage Month Cultural Affairs Guide Los Angeles
2013 African American Heritage Month Cultural Affairs Guide Los Angeles
2013 African American Heritage Month Cultural Affairs Guide Los Angeles
2013 African American Heritage Month Cultural Affairs Guide Los Angeles
2013 African American Heritage Month Cultural Affairs Guide Los Angeles
2013 African American Heritage Month Cultural Affairs Guide Los Angeles
2013 African American Heritage Month Cultural Affairs Guide Los Angeles
2013 African American Heritage Month Cultural Affairs Guide Los Angeles
2013 African American Heritage Month Cultural Affairs Guide Los Angeles
2013 African American Heritage Month Cultural Affairs Guide Los Angeles
2013 African American Heritage Month Cultural Affairs Guide Los Angeles
2013 African American Heritage Month Cultural Affairs Guide Los Angeles
2013 African American Heritage Month Cultural Affairs Guide Los Angeles
2013 African American Heritage Month Cultural Affairs Guide Los Angeles
2013 African American Heritage Month Cultural Affairs Guide Los Angeles
2013 African American Heritage Month Cultural Affairs Guide Los Angeles
2013 African American Heritage Month Cultural Affairs Guide Los Angeles
2013 African American Heritage Month Cultural Affairs Guide Los Angeles
2013 African American Heritage Month Cultural Affairs Guide Los Angeles
2013 African American Heritage Month Cultural Affairs Guide Los Angeles
2013 African American Heritage Month Cultural Affairs Guide Los Angeles
2013 African American Heritage Month Cultural Affairs Guide Los Angeles
2013 African American Heritage Month Cultural Affairs Guide Los Angeles
2013 African American Heritage Month Cultural Affairs Guide Los Angeles
2013 African American Heritage Month Cultural Affairs Guide Los Angeles
2013 African American Heritage Month Cultural Affairs Guide Los Angeles
2013 African American Heritage Month Cultural Affairs Guide Los Angeles
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2013 African American Heritage Month Cultural Affairs Guide Los Angeles

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2013 African American Heritage Month Cultural Affairs Guide Los Angeles …

2013 African American Heritage Month Cultural Affairs Guide Los Angeles
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  • 1. PRESENTED BY MAYOR ANTONIO R. VILL ARAIGOSA AND THE DEPARTMENT OF CULTURAL AFFAIRS CITY OF LOS ANGELES
  • 2. CIT Y OF LOS ANGELES / 2013 AFRICAN AME RICAN HE RITAGE MONTH CELE BR ATION Antonio R. Villaraigosa Mayor City of Los Angeles Aileen Adams Deputy Mayor Strategic Partnerships Torie Osborn Deputy Mayor Neighborhood and Community Services LOS ANGELES CITY COUNCIL CULTURAL AFFAIRS COMMISSION Ed P. Reyes, District 1 York Chang President Paul Krekorian, District 2 Josephine Ramirez Vice President Dennis P. Zine, District 3 Tom LaBonge, District 4 Paul Koretz, District 5 Tony Cardenas, District 6 Richard Alarcon, District 7 Bernard C. Parks, District 8 Jan Perry, District 9 Herb J. Wesson, District 10 Bill Rosendahl, District 11 Mitchell Englander, District 12 Maria Bell Annie Chu Charmaine Jefferson Richard Montoya Lee Ramer DEPARTMENT OF CULTURAL AFFAIRS CITY OF LOS ANGELES Olga Garay-English Executive Director Eric Garcetti, District 13 Jose Huizar, District 14 Joe Buscaino, District 15 Matthew Rudnick Assistant General Manger Carmen Trutanich Los Angeles City Attorney Will Caperton y Montoya Director of Marketing and Development Wendy Greuel Los Angeles City Controller CALENDAR PRODUCTION Will Caperton y Montoya Editor and Art Director Martica Caraballo Stork Assistant Editor Terese Harris Design PMAC Services tmharris@pmacservices.com Front Cover: Toni Scott, Looking Towards the Future – Artist Sam Sarpong, Photograph, 2009
  • 3. OFFICE OF THE MAYOR CIT Y OF LOS ANGELE S ANTONIO R. VILLARAIGOSA February 2013 Dear Friends, On behalf of the City of Los Angeles, it is my pleasure to invite you to celebrate this year’s African American Heritage Month, themed “Continuing the Dream ~ African Americans at the Crossroads of Freedom and Equality.” Our City is home to people originating from all around the world. Each culture contributes to the rich diversity that makes Los Angeles an international capital. This month we continue to honor our rich African American culture and highlight the work of artists who keep African American traditions alive and vibrant in our communities. The Department of Cultural Affairs (DCA) offers countless arts and cultural events for your enjoyment. Look to this calendar and cultural guide to find the numerous festivals, musical events, exhibitions, dance and theatrical performances, films, poetry readings, and cultural activities in your neighborhood. I encourage you to take part in the special events listed throughout these pages, and welcome you into DCA’s Neighborhood Arts and Cultural Centers to celebrate African American Heritage Month. I extend my best wishes for a memorable celebration. Very truly yours, Antonio R. Villaraigosa Mayor City of Los Angeles
  • 4. CIT Y OF LOS ANGELES / 2013 AFRICAN AMERICAN HERITAGE MONTH CELEBR ATION DEPARTMENT OF CULTUR AL AFFAIRS CIT Y OF LOS ANGELE S OLGA GARAY-ENGLISH February 2013 Dear Friends, The Department of Cultural Affairs is pleased to present this calendar of events celebrating the vibrant African American cultural traditions that continue to shape the unique heritage of our great City. These events honor the extraordinary range of African American experiences, from ancient traditions, to the contemporary voices of our artists and storytellers. We are pleased to showcase engaging art produced by our Los Angeles artists in this publication. Their vision pays homage to steps taken in the past, but looks towards the future with a contemporary edge. Combined with the work of other artists of African descent around the City, they truly represent the heart and soul of this year’s African American Heritage Month Celebration. Our young people have many opportunities to become involved in this celebration through our Music LA program and our poster competition. We invite them to participate in these artistic activities at DCA’s Neighborhood Arts and Cultural Centers and learn more about African American art, history, and culture. Since our City knows few boundaries, we are collaborating with our colleagues in neighboring cities to include calendar events around the Los Angeles area. We engaged corporate partners and community leaders to support these events, and want to acknowledge our appreciation for their ongoing generosity. We also extend our thanks to the members of Our Authors Study Club, the Mayor’s staff, and the many nonprofit organizations, community groups, and arts organizations whose efforts helped us create this impressive listing of fun, educational, and exciting events. What better place to see fantastic art, experience a taste of African American culture, and celebrate a City’s great heritage than Los Angeles? We hope you will join in the festivities and enjoy! Olga Garay-English Executive Director City of Los Angeles Department of Cultural Affairs 2
  • 5. AFRICAN AMERICAN HERITAGE MONTH COMMIT TE E CIT Y OF LOS ANGELES / 2013 OFFICE OF THE MAYOR EVENT LEADERS: Capri Maddox, Chair Board of Public Works Commissioner Brenda Anderson Office of the Mayor Fabiola Vilchez Office of the Mayor Theresa Curtis Carole J. McCoy Lori Estrada Modena Moore Olga Garay-English Tammie Murray Ernestine (Jan) Gordon Mary Louise Reeves Mildred Gordon Pierre Riotoc Rebeca Guerrero Isabel Rojas-Williams Our Authors Study Club Office of the Mayor Department of Cultural Affairs Our Authors Study Club Our Authors Study Club COMMITTEE MEMBERS: Evelyn G. Aleman Media Image Public Relations Ayuko Babu Pan African Film Festival Rayes Barrera Department of Cultural Affairs Marcelina Hawthorne Department of Cultural Affairs Angie Cedillo Office of the Mayor Lena Cole Dennis Communities & Connection Mary C. Cotton Our Authors Study Club Department of General Services The Mural Conservancy of Los Angeles Josefina Salvador Maude Johnson Martica Caraballo Stork Our Authors Study Club Cora Jackson-Fossett James Burks Department of Cultural Affairs Office of the Mayor Matthew Rudnick Office of the Mayor Will Caperton y Montoya Our Authors Study Club National Congress of Black Women Public Works/ Los Angeles Association of Black Personnel Department of Cultural Affairs Artist Our Authors Study Club Juan Carlos Lacey Office of the Mayor Angelica Loa-Perez Department of Cultural Affairs Joe Macias Media Image Public Relations Asia McClain FOX Broadcasting Company Peggy McClain Department of Cultural Affairs Office of the Mayor Dr. Genevieve A. Sheperd Our Authors Study Club Brenda Threatt Office of the Mayor Paola Valdivia Office of the Mayor Sarah Washington Office of the Mayor Debra Winters Dance SouthLA Kenneth Wyrick Cutortronics Our Authors Study Club 3
  • 6. CIT Y OF LOS ANGELES / 2013 MAYOR’S AFRICAN AME RICAN HE RITAGE MONTH AWARDS LEVAR BURTON 4
  • 7. LEVAR BURTON The multi-talented LeVar Burton has been capturing the attention of audiences and peers for over two decades, and has catapulted to a new level within the industry. Whether acting, directing, producing, or writing, LeVar proves he can do it all. This spring he launches the Reading Rainbow App through Apple and brings one of the most cherished and revered children’s programs of all time into the millennium. Currently, he is co-starring in the animated cartoon, Transformer, Rescue Bots and this summer he will debut in the much anticipated ABC drama, Perception, co-starring with Eric McCormack and Rachael Leigh Cook. He recently played himself on the hugely popular CBS Series The Big Bang Theory and guest starred on NBC’s Community. LeVar’s first career choice was not in the field of entertainment. At the age of thirteen he entered a Catholic Seminary to study for the priesthood. For him, being a priest would fulfill his need to express himself spiritually and to be of service to his community. However, four years later, he decided that an acting career would better fill those needs, so he left the seminary and accepted a full academic scholarship to the University of Southern California to pursue a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree. LeVar’s first professional audition, at the age of nineteen, led to his being cast as Kunta Kinte in the acclaimed miniseries Roots. The phenomenal success of Roots launched his career as an actor, and earned him an Emmy nomination for Best Lead Actor in a Mini Series. What followed were starring roles in a string of television movies including: Dummy, Grambling’s White Tiger, The Guyana Tragedy, and The Ron LeFlore Story. Among his early feature film credits are Looking for Mr. Goodbar and The Hunter, with Steve McQueen. LeVar is internationally known for his portrayal of Lt. Commander Geordi LaForge in the television series Star Trek: The Next Generation. He starred in the box office hits Star Trek: First Contact, Star Trek: Insurrection, Star Trek: Generations, and recently co-starred in the fourth feature film in the series, Star Trek: Nemesis. LeVar has directed numerous episodes of all four Star Trek series: The Next Generation, Deep Space Nine, Voyager, and Enterprise. His first dramatic television movie, The Tiger Woods Story, which he directed for Showtime, received great critical acclaim as well as three Emmy nominations. He also directed the Disney Channel original film Smart House. LeVar’s production company, INTEGRITY ENTERTAINMENT, is developing a variety of projects in both television and feature film arenas. LeVar’s first honor of the new millennium was a Grammy Award for his narration of the book The Autobiography of Martin Luther King Jr. Included in the titles LeVar has recorded on tape are The Watsons Go To Birmingham, The Miles Davis Story, and The Jackie Robinson Story. He is currently celebrating his twentieth season as host and executive producer of the highly acclaimed PBS children’s television series Reading Rainbow. Thus far, his role in producing and starring in the series has garnered him a total of ten Emmy Awards, five NAACP Awards and multiple nominations. He is most proud of Reading Rainbow’s ability to use the medium of television to help create “human beings who are passionate about literature.” As a staunch advocate for children’s literacy, LeVar is frequently called upon to lecture on the subject by organizations around the world. LeVar made his debut as an author in 1997 with his novel Aftermath. This science fiction thriller from Warner Books takes place in the year 2019 and chronicles the efforts of four individuals who are struggling to pick up the pieces in the aftermath of a race war that all but destroys America. With phenomenal reviews from critics and colleagues, Aftermath is still in bookstores nationwide. LeVar is currently national co-chair with First Lady Laura Bush of PBS’s literacy campaign, SHARE-A-STORY. 5
  • 8. CIT Y OF LOS ANGELES / 2013 MAYOR’S AFRICAN AME RICAN HE RITAGE MONTH AWARDS LL COOL J 6
  • 9. LL COOL J LL Cool J is an entertainment icon crossing multiple mediums. A two-time Grammy® Award winner, recording artist, talented actor, author, NAACP Image Award winner, entrepreneur, and philanthropist, LL displays his wide range of talents with every project. LL Cool J began in the nascent, burgeoning rap and hip-hop scene of the 80s, which developed into the musical and cultural phenomenon that is today’s hip-hop. Now a musical and cultural force, LL was first introduced to the world in 1984 as a Def Jam Records flagship artist. Since then, he has become the first rap artist to amass ten consecutive platinum-plus selling albums, in addition to 2004’s The Definition and 2006’s Todd Smith which both went Gold. The multi-platinum artist and two-time Rock and Roll Hall of Fame nominee is currently tied for third place for most Billboard chart debuts by a rapper. In 2008, LL released his critically acclaimed album Exit 13, his appropriately titled 13th and last album. LL successfully transitioned to acting on one of the consistently highest rated television shows, the CBS hit primetime drama series seen in more than 200 countries, NCIS: Los Angeles. His performance on the show garnered him NAACP Image Awards in 2011 and 2012. He previously won an NAACP Image Award for “Outstanding Male Artist” in 2003 and hosted the show in 2007. His other television roles include appearances on FOX’s hit drama, House and the NBC comedy 30 Rock, in a memorable performance as hip-hop mogul ‘Ridiculous.’ LL appeared in more than 30 films and starred opposite acclaimed actors such as Samuel L. Jackson and Colin Farrell in S.W.A.T.; Al Pacino, Jamie Foxx, and Cameron Diaz in Oliver Stone’s Any Given Sunday; and Gabrielle Union in Deliver Us from Eva. Other film credits include: Rollerball, Charlie’s Angels, Kingdom Come, In Too Deep, Toys, Slow Burn, and Edison with Morgan Freeman. He also received a Blockbuster Award for best comedic performance as the Chef in Renny Harlin’s action film Deep Blue Sea and starred in Last Holiday, opposite Queen Latifah. Also an author, LL released LL COOL J’s Platinum 360 Diet and Lifestyle in May 2010, the follow-up to his New York Times Bestseller LL COOL J’s Platinum Workout, which detailed the evolution of his workout philosophy as well as the secrets that have helped him achieve his greatest goals not only in the gym, but as an actor, businessman, and multi-platinum musician. In 2002 he released a children’s book, And the Winner Is, as part of Scholastics series of books and CDs by today’s hottest rap stars called ‘Hip Kid Hop.’ The book tells the story of a young basketball player who learns the importance of winning and losing gracefully. He also penned a 1997 autobiography, I Make My Own Rules. Prior to hosting the GRAMMY Awards In 2012, for which he earned rave reviews, LL has hosted and produced the GRAMMY Nominations Concert Live Special for the past four years and has also been a presenter at the Emmy, Golden Globe, and SAG Awards. Expanding into the digital world, LL founded www.boomdizzle.com, an online social networking community providing a world-wide digital platform for existing and new artists to create, promote, perform, and distribute music and entertainment. An avid philanthropist, LL supports numerous charitable causes promoting the arts, music, and literacy for young people, and has hosted his own team-building athletic program, “Jump and Ball,” in his hometown of Queens for the last eight years. He is also a member of the Red Cross Celebrity Cabinet, and raises funds and awareness for initiatives tied to the organization. He resides in Los Angeles and New York with his wife and family. 7
  • 10. CIT Y OF LOS ANGELES / 2013 MAYOR’S AFRICAN AME RICAN HE RITAGE MONTH AWARDS DANNY GLOVER 8
  • 11. DANNY GLOVER Actor, producer, and humanitarian, Danny Glover has been a commanding presence on screen, stage, and television for more than 25 years. As an actor, his film credits range from the blockbuster Lethal Weapon franchise to smaller independent features, some of which Glover also produced. In recent years he has starred in an array of motion pictures including the critically-acclaimed Dreamgirls directed by Bill Condon and in the futuristic 2012 for director Roland Emmerich. In addition to his film work, Glover is highly sought after as a public speaker, delivering inspiring addresses and moving performances in such diverse venues as college campuses, union rallies, and business conventions. Glover has gained respect for his wide-reaching community activism and philanthropic efforts, with a particular emphasis on advocacy for economic justice and access to health care and education programs in the United States and Africa. For these efforts Glover received a 2006 DGA Honor and was honored with a 2011 “Pioneer Award” from the National Civil Rights Museum. Internationally Glover has served as a Goodwill Ambassador for the United Nations Development Program from 1998-2004, focusing on issues of poverty, disease, and economic development in Africa, Latin America, and the Caribbean. Glover was presented in 2011 with the prestigious Medaille des Arts et des Letters from the French Ministry of Culture and was honored with a Tribute at the Deauville International Film Festival. Currently Glover serves as UNICEF Ambassador. In 2005 Glover co-founded New York-based Louverture Films with writer/producer Joslyn Barnes. The company is dedicated to the development and production of films of historical relevance, social purpose, commercial value, and artistic integrity. Among the films Glover has executive produced at Louverture are: the César-nominated Bamako; Sundance Grand Jury Prize winner and Oscar and Emmy nominated Trouble The Water; the award winning The Black Power Mixtape 1967-1975; and the 2012 Sundance Grand Jury Prize winner The House I Live In. He has also associate produced Elia Suleiman’s The Time That Remains, and the 2010 Cannes Palme d’Or winner Uncle Boonmee Who Can Recall His Past Lives. A native of San Francisco, Glover trained at the Black Actors’ Workshop of the American Conservatory Theatre. It was his Broadway debut in Fugard’s Master Harold…and the Boys that brought him to national recognition and led director Robert Benton to cast him in his first leading role in 1984’s Academy Award-nominated Best Picture, Places in the Heart. The following year Glover starred in two more Best Picture nominated films: Peter Weir’s Witness and Steven Spielberg’s The Color Purple. In 1987 Glover partnered with Mel Gibson in the first Lethal Weapon film and went on the star in three hugely successful Lethal Weapon sequels. Glover has also invested his talents in more personal projects including the award-winning To Sleep With Anger which he executive produced, and for which he won an Independent Spirit Award for Best Actor; Bopha!; Manderlay; Missing in America; and the film version of Athol Fugard’s play Boseman and Lena. He also starred in The Royal Tenenbaums, Saw, Shooter, and Death at a Funeral. On the small screen, Glover won an Image Award, a Cable ACE Award, and earned an Emmy nomination for his performance in the title role of the HBO Movie Mandela. He has also received Emmy nominations for his work in the acclaimed miniseries Lonesome Dove and in the telefilm Freedom Song, and earned a Daytime Emmy nomination for Showtime’s Just a Dream as a director. Most recently, Glover was a co-star on the popular television series Touch. 9
  • 12. Charles Alston, The Negro in California History - Exploitation and Colonization, Painting, 1948 California African American Museum
  • 13. Toni Scott, Trailblazers – The Three Kings, Photo collage, 2009
  • 14. CIT Y OF LOS ANGELES / 2013 AFRICAN AMERICAN HERITAGE MONTH CELEBR ATION AFRICAN AMERICAN HERITAGE MONTH OPENING CELEBR ATION Join Mayor Antonio R. Villaraigosa and the Los Angeles City Council to officially declare the opening of African American Heritage Month in the City of Los Angeles. The Mayor will award the City’s Spirit, Dream, and Hope Awards during a ceremony in Council Chambers with a live simulcast in Fletcher Bowron Square followed by an outside program and reception. WHEN: February 8, 2013, 10:00 a.m. WHERE: City Hall Council Chambers, City Hall 200 North Spring Street, Los Angeles, CA 90012 WHEN: Outside Program, Entertainment, and Reception at 10:45 a.m. WHERE: Fletcher Bowron Square 300 North Main Street (Northeast Corner of Temple and Main) Los Angeles, CA 90012 COST: Free SPONSORS: Time Warner Cable, ABC7, The Walt Disney Company, Wells Fargo, AT&T, Toyota, Toyota Financial Services, Fox Audience Strategy, Coca-Cola, Media Image P.R., Music Center, The Los Angeles Dodgers, Office of the Mayor, Los Angeles City Council, Department of Cultural Affairs, Board of Public Works, Our Authors Study Club, Inc., and the African American Heritage Month Committee INFO: 213.922.9762 or SP-RSVP@lacity.org 13
  • 15. CIT Y OF LOS ANGELES / 2013 AFRICAN AMERICAN HERITAGE MONTH CELEBR ATION Ronald Jackson, Movement, Hand and digital illustration DCA’S MUSIC L A AFRICAN AMERICAN HERITAGE MONTH CL ASSE S Sponsored by The Walt Disney Company Music LA celebrates African American Heritage Month by hosting free music classes for elementary, middle, and high school students presented by Mayor Antonio R. Villaraigosa, The Walt Disney Company, and the Department of Cultural Affairs (DCA). The Music LA Program is proud to partner with A Place Called Home and DCA’s William Grant Still Arts Center to create two unique music curricula that focus on different historic contributions within the diverse landscape of African and African American music, dance, and culture. All participating Music LA students will learn basic principles of music through hands-on instrumental and/or vocal classes. Student participation will include performance training in an ensemble setting through classes and rehearsals. After eight to ten weeks of instruction, all students will take part in a free culminating performance for family and friends. All DCA Music LA African American Heritage Month classes are designed to celebrate African American culture, foster pride and understanding of African American music traditions, and are free for young people ages 3 to age 18. Musical instruments will be provided for Beginners. Intermediate to Advanced students are encouraged to bring their own instruments. Please read below for specific course descriptions and contact one of our Music LA sites for class schedules, enrollment details, and to pre-register today! WHEN: COST: Free SPONSORS: 14 February to April The Walt Disney Company, Office of the Mayor, Los Angeles City Council, and the Department of Cultural Affairs
  • 16. MAYOR’S EVENTS MUSIC L A AT A PL ACE CALLED HOME The Department of Cultural Affairs is excited to work with A Place Called Home for the first time to offer Music LA classes at their location in South Central Los Angeles. The Music LA African American Heritage Month Session at A Place Called Home will feature Beginner through Advanced level classes for young people between the ages of 8 and 18. Students will have an array of courses to choose from, including African Drumming and Introduction to Music, in addition to four performance ensembles: Steel Drum Ensemble, Vocal Ensemble, Beginning Performance Ensemble, and/or Advanced Performance Ensemble. The session will highlight several African and African American music genres and their influence on modern day music. The 8-week curriculum is anchored with a focus on the history of Congo Square in New Orleans and the rich musical traditions of the “second line” that traces its origins to West Africa. Students will further explore music and song forms as they transitioned from spirituals, gospel, blues, and jazz, into other popular genres. New students are welcome! No prior musical experience necessary. WHERE: A Place Called Home, 2830 South Central Avenue, Los Angeles, CA 90011 CONTACT: Xiomara Pedraza, 323.232.7653 x 2239, xiomara@apch.org, apch.org Janet E. Dandridge, Portrait of a Singer, Photograph 15
  • 17. Bryan Tilford, “Aretha” What is Soul? Series, Newspaper and acrylic on canvas board, 20” x 24”, 2012
  • 18. MAYOR’S EVENTS Caron Bowman, Beach Pop MUSIC L A AT THE WILLIAM GR ANT STILL ARTS CENTER Each year, DCA’s William Grant Still Arts Center features a musical artist/composer in celebration of African American Heritage Month through an art exhibition and a music education program. This year, Music LA is proud to present classes that will focus on the life and work of legendary jazz music artist, Sun Ra. Beginner and Intermediate instruction in Guitar, Keyboard, Drum Set, Clarinet, Voice, as well as Band Ensemble will be offered. Early Childhood level instruction on recorder and ukulele will also be offered for little ones, ages 3 to 6. This 10-week session is designed to introduce young people to the musical instruments of the jazz genre, and expose them to the limitless possibilities of discovery through music, utilizing the vast repertoire and philosophy of Sun Ra as a unifying theme. Call to pre-register today! WHERE: William Grant Still Arts Center, 2520 South West View Street Los Angeles, CA 90016 CONTACT: Keisa Davis, 323.734.1165, keisa.davis@lacity.org, wgsac.wordpress.com 17
  • 19. CIT Y OF LOS ANGELES / 2013 AFRICAN AMERICAN HERITAGE MONTH CELEBR ATION Toni Scott, South Africa: Distorted 1, Photograph, 2013 AFRICAN AMERICAN HERITAGE MONTH POSTER COMPETITION AND PROGR AM Sponsored by Wells Fargo In celebration of African American Heritage Month, Mayor Antonio R. Villaraigosa, in partnership with Wells Fargo and the Department of Cultural Affairs, is hosting a poster competition for children and adolescents in Los Angeles. This annual contest invites students of all backgrounds, from kindergarten through high school, to showcase their artistic skills and to explore African American traditions and contributions. Entries will be judged by a panel of professional artists, educators, and community leaders. The purpose of the City of Los Angeles’ 2013 African American Heritage Month educational and cultural programs is to foster a greater appreciation of African American history and to promote greater access to arts and cultural resources within Los Angeles. WHEN: WHERE: Los Angeles Zoo, 5333 Zoo Drive, Los Angeles, CA 90027 COST: Free SPONSORS: Wells Fargo, ABC7, The Walt Disney Company, Time Warner Cable, The Los Angeles Dodgers, Media Image P.R., Office of the Mayor, Los Angeles City Council, Department of Cultural Affairs, Board of Public Works, and the African American Heritage Month Committee INFO: 18 February 27, 2013 213.202.5545, culturela.org, or rebeca.guerrero@lacity.org
  • 20. MAYOR’S EVENTS Greg Pitts, The Responsibility of Ancestral Memory, Mixed media collage 19
  • 21. Kevin Tidmore, at left, Reflections, 93” x 32”, 2012, at right, Inner Space, 40” x 29”, 2009, both, Photograph
  • 22. OUR AUTHORS STUDY CLUB A MESSAGE FROM THE PRESIDE NT MS. ERNESTINE JANET GORDON 2013 Annual Black History Month National Theme — At The Crossroads of Freedom and Equality: The Emancipation Proclamation and The March on Washington. Greetings from Our Authors Study Club, Inc. This is indeed a most profound moment in history with the re-election of the first Black President of the United States of America. Nobody believed we would see this day, but because of the tremendous sacrifices of those who have gone before us and had the foresight, belief, and faith in a better America for Blacks, we start this year’s Black History Month proud of those achievements. Unfortunately, we have all felt the sting of racial injustice and bigotry, but it only made us stronger. The year 2013 marks two important anniversaries in the history of African Americans and the United States. On January 1, 1863, the Emancipation Proclamation set the United States on the path of ending slavery. A wartime measure issued by President Abraham Lincoln, the proclamation freed relatively few slaves, but it fueled the fire of the enslaved to strike for their freedom. In many respects, Lincoln’s declaration simply acknowledged the epidemic of black self-emancipation – spread by black freedom crusaders like Harriet Tubman – that already had commenced beyond his control. Those in bondage increasingly streamed into the camps of the Union Army, reclaiming and asserting self-determination. The result, abolitionist Fredrick Douglass predicted, was that the war for the Union became a war against slavery. The actions of both Lincoln and the slaves made clear that the Civil War was in deed, as well as in theory, a struggle between the forces of slavery and emancipation. The full-scale dismantlement of the “peculiar institution” of human bondage had begun. In 1963, a century later, America once again stood at the crossroads. Nine years earlier, the U.S. Supreme Court had outlawed racial segregation in public schools, but the nation had not yet committed itself to equality of citizenship. Segregation and innumerable other forms of discrimination made second-class citizenship the extra-constitutional status of non-whites. Another American president caught in the gale of racial change, John F. Kennedy, temporized over the legal and moral issue of his time. Like Lincoln before him, national concerns, and the growing momentum of black mass mobilization efforts, overrode ambivalence toward demands for black civil rights. On August 28, 1963, hundreds of thousands of Americans, blacks and whites, Jews and gentiles, Protestants and Catholics, marched to the memorial of Abraham Lincoln, the author of the Emancipation Proclamation, in the continuing pursuit of equality of citizenship and self-determination. It was on this occasion that Martin Luther King, Jr. delivered his celebrated “I Have a Dream” speech. Just as the Emancipation Proclamation had recognized the coming end of slavery, the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom announced that the days of legal segregation in the United States were numbered. Marking the sesquicentennial of the Emancipation Proclamation and the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington, the Association for the Study of African American Life and History and the local Branch Our Authors Study Club has the privilege and awesome responsibly to continue this legacy. We do so by recognizing those making significant strides against injustice, those contributing to the “better good” of all Americans, and supporting and encouraging those young boys and girls in high school and post-high school for a brighter future for all. We also do so by disseminating our history to others, remembering: “Reach back to do well for those less fortunate and pay forward for the blessings we ourselves have received.” 22
  • 23. CELEBR ATION / 2013 AFRICAN AMERICAN HERITAGE MONTH THE EMANCIPATION PROCLAMATION AND THE MARCH ON WASHINGTON OUR AUTHORS STUDY CLUB LOS ANGELE S BR ANCH OF THE ASSOCIATION FOR THE STUDY OF AFR ICAN AMER ICAN LIFE AND HISTORY, INC. 2013 OFFICERS MEMBERS Ernestine Janet Gordon Caroline Culpepper President Keta Davis Mary C. Cotton Laura Falwell 1st Vice President Vanessa J. Hawkins Peggy McClellan Jessie Mae Holmes 2nd Vice President Toni M. Humber Maude Johnson Charmaine Jefferson 3rd Vice President Beatrice Jones Theresa Curtis Mary Ella Lewis Recording Secretary Mildred Midkiff Lura Daniels-Ball Corresponding Secretary Christine B. Nelson Mary Louise Reeves Mildred M. Gordon Lovella Singer Financial Secretary Brenda Tyson M. Stephene Johnson Treasurer Nallah Malik Historian Ernestine Huff Parliamentarian Albertine Brown Chaplain Dr. Genevieve A. Shepherd Mordena M. Moore President Emerita Executive Director Our Authors Study Club, Inc. LA Branch of ASALH Post Office Box 882025 Los Angeles, CA 90009-3019 23
  • 24. OUR AUTHORS STUDY CLUB 2012 GE NE R AL CHAIRS BERNARD & SHIRLEY KINSEY PHIL ANTHROPISTS, HISTORIANS, EDUCATORS, AND LOVERS OF OUR COMMUNIT Y Bernard and Shirley Kinsey live their lives by two simple principles: “To whom much is given, much is required,” and “Living a Life of No Regrets.” The Kinseys are avid travelers, having visited 90 countries over their 46-year marriage. Throughout their early travels, they became very interested in the indigenous cultures they visited, resulting in them collecting art and artifacts from each of their stops. When their son Khalil was in the 3rd grade, he was given a family history report which troubled them, as they could not research further back than their great-great grandparents. This began the Kinsey’s quest to discover more about their family history and the collective history of African Americans. For the past 30 years, Bernard and Shirley Kinsey have been passionate and diligent about the story of the African American experience, collecting significant objects that speak to the achievement and contributions made by African Americans in building this country. They have acquired many of the original historical documents, books, manuscripts, and artifacts dating back to 1600, as well as 2 and 3 dimensional art by the masters. Seminal objects in the collection include a Grafton Tyler Brown painting from 1885, a 1773 original copy of Phillis Wheatley’s Poems on Various Subjects Religious and Moral, the 1857 Dred Scott Decision, and the first issue of the Emancipation Proclamation in 1862, as well as artworks from Elizabeth Catlett, Charles White, Romare Bearden, and Richmond Barthé to name a few. What began, as a personal passion for discovery and knowledge, has now become a collection that is being shared with over three million people and has created better narrative and dialogue about African American history and culture. This narrative is one that is not often taught or found in history books, a fact that the Kinsey’s are helping to change as evidenced by the Florida Department of Education developing an African American history curriculum based on their exhibit and the Kinsey Collection that will be taught statewide. The Kinsey Collection strives to educate, motivate, and inspire Americans to learn more about the remarkable contributions of African Americans. With their son Khalil, the Kinsey’s have developed a 198 page coffee table book adopted by the State of Florida to use in teaching African American History, and a companion lecture series “What you Didn’t Learn in High School History” has been seen by over thirty five thousand people nationwide, detailing the significant roles that African Americans have played since America’s inception. The Kinsey Collection exhibition has traveled to the Smithsonian National Museum of American History and to eight cities, and has been seen by over three million people. The Kinsey’s personal treasures will be on display at the Walt Disney World Resort at Epcot Center at the American Adventure Pavilion, where an estimated twenty million people will view it over the next three years. The Kinseys have raised over $22 million dollars for charitable and educational organizations and have assisted over three hundred young people to attend college. 24
  • 25. Elizabeth Catlett, El Abrazo (The Embrace), Carved mahogany with painted details, 1978, California African American Museum, Golden State Mutual Life Insurance Company Art Collection on loan courtesy California State Insurance Commissioner
  • 26. CELEBR ATION / 2013 AFRICAN AMERICAN HERITAGE MONTH THE EMANCIPATION PROCLAMATION AND THE MARCH ON WASHINGTON OUR AUTHORS STUDY CLUB LOS ANGELE S BR ANCH OF THE ASSOCIATION FOR THE STUDY OF AFR ICAN AMER ICAN LIFE AND HISTORY, INC. 2013 HONOR ARY CHAIRPERSONS Bernard & Shirley Kinsey Philanthropists, Historians, Educators, and Lovers of our Community 2013 HONOR ARY COMMIT TEE Danny J. Bakewell, Sr. Executive Publisher / CEO Los Angeles Sentinel Carl A. Ballton President Union Bank Charisse Bremond Weaver President / CEO Brotherhood Crusade Laphonza Butler President SEIU United Long Term Care Workers Judge Mablean Ephriam Television Personality Sandra Evers-Manly President Northrop Grumman Foundation Belinda Fontenot-Jamerson Board President Museum of African American Art Kimberly Freeman Regional Director, Community Relations Southern California Gas Wendy Gladney President / CEO Personnel Services Plus Clifton L. Johnson Vice President Union Bank Randy Rice Executive Director, Educational Programs Farmer’s Insurance Group Francille Rusan Wilson, PhD Professor University of Southern California 26
  • 27. CELEBR ATION / 2013 AFRICAN AMERICAN HERITAGE MONTH OUR AUTHORS STUDY CLUB LOS ANGELE S BR ANCH OF THE ASSOCIATION FOR THE STUDY OF AFR ICAN AMER ICAN LIFE AND HISTORY, INC. On September 9, 1915, Dr. Carter G. Woodson held a meeting in Chicago, Illinois with Alexander L. Jackson, Executive Secretary of the new Negro YMCA branch. In addition to Woodson and Jackson, three other men were present: George Cleveland Hall, W. B. Hartgrove, and J. E. Stamps. At this meeting they formed the Association for the Study of Negro Life and History (ASNLH) and appointed Dr. Woodson, Executive Director, a post he held until his death on April 3, 1950. Today, this organization is known as the Association for the Study of African American Life and History, Inc. (ASALH). Its headquarters is currently on campus at Howard University in Washington, DC. In Los Angeles, a group of Terminal Annex postal workers brought their proposal to read the works of African American authors and learn the true history of Africans in the Americas to Mrs. Vassie Davis Wright and Our Authors Study Club (OASC) was formed on February 14, 1945. Mrs. Wright recommended that the group affiliate with Dr. Woodson’s organization and Dr. Carter G. Woodson, himself, chartered Our Authors Study Club as the Los Angeles Branch of ASNLH in June 1945. OASC was incorporated as a California non-profit organization in 1946. Our Authors Study Club, Inc. (OASC) began citywide celebrations for what was Negro History Week in 1947. In 1950, Los Angeles Mayor Fletcher Bowron issued the first proclamation acknowledging Our Authors Study Club, Inc. as the primary sponsor of Negro History Week and invited citizens of Los Angeles to join the celebration. In 1959, while serving as General Chairperson for Negro History Week, the late Gilbert Lindsay, moved the Opening Ceremony to City Hall steps where the celebration now takes place every year, weather permitting. In the year of the nation’s Bicentennial, 1976, the celebration was expanded to the entire month of February and is now known as African American Heritage Month. OASC continues its original mission and now offers programs that include a Reading Program for elementary school students; an Oratorical Contest for high school students; scholarships for deserving college students seeking a Bachelor’s Degree; and, a fellowship for Ph.D. candidates researching African American history, literature, and/or culture. Additional activities include an annual Tour of African American Landmarks in Los Angeles and the Dr. Carter G. Woodson Scholarship and Awards Luncheon where the accomplishments of extraordinary African Americans are recognized. Our Authors Study Club, Inc. also supports the restoration of Dr. Carter G. Woodson’s home in Washington, DC, now declared a National Historic Site, and partners with community organizations including the Black Hollywood Education and Resource Center (BHERC) and the Sigma Sigma Alumnae Chapter of Sigma Gamma Rho Sorority, Inc. For more information about the Association for the Study of African American Life and History, visit their website at www.asalh.org. Our Authors Study Club, Inc. is a non-profit 501 (c) (3) organization. For more information, write Our Authors Study Club, Inc. at Post Office Box 882025, Los Angeles, California 90009-3019. 27
  • 28. ASSOCIATION FOR THE STUDY OF AFR ICAN AMER IC AN LIFE AND HISTORY, INC. DR. CARTER GODWIN WOODSON ( DECEMBER 19, 1875 - APR IL 3, 1950 ) FOUNDER OF THE ASSOCIATION FOR THE STUDY OF AFR ICAN AMER ICAN LIFE AND HISTORY, INC . Dr. Carter Godwin Woodson was born on December 19, 1875 in New Canton, Buckingham County, Virginia. His parents were former slaves Anne Eliza (Riddle) and James Henry Woodson. He died suddenly on April 3, 1950. He was the second African American to receive a Ph.D. degree Harvard University (Dr. W.E.B. DuBois was the first). Dr. Woodson and four supporters organized the Association for the Study of Negro Life and History on Thursday, September 9, 1915 in the Wabash Avenue YMCA office located on the south side of Chicago, Illinois. His dream for ASALH was to archive sociological and historical data, publish books, promote the study of African American life and history, and encourage racial harmony through the organization and work of clubs and schools. In 1916, ASALH published the first issue of the “Journal of Negro History,” a highly respected and scholarly digest that was followed in 1937 by the “Negro History Bulletin,” a widely circulated historically oriented magazine. In 1920, Dr. Woodson founded the Associated Publishers, the for-profit arm of the Association. The Associated Publishers is responsible for the publication and circulation of ASALH’s renowned African American History Month Kits. Additionally, the Associated Publishers sells books and other literature authored by Dr. Woodson and other prominent scholars in the field of African American history. In February 1926, Dr. Woodson announced the institution of Negro History Week, which coincided with the birthdays of Abraham Lincoln and Frederick Douglass. In 1976, the observance was expanded to “National African American History Month,” in honor of the nation’s bicentennial. Beginning in 1975, U.S. Presidents have paid tribute to the mission of the Association and urged all Americans to celebrate African American History Month. Since 1926, ASALH has established the national theme for the month-long celebration of African American History Month. The Association maintains the Carter G. Woodson Home in Washington, D.C., where Woodson operated ASALH from 1923 until his death in 1950. The Woodson Home is a National Historic Landmark. The work of the organization has historically been to promote, research, preserve, interpret, and disseminate information about African American life, history, and culture to the global community. ASALH www.asalh.org info@asalh.net 28
  • 29. Romare Bearden, Prevalence of Ritual #1, 1974, California African American Museum Foundation Purchase
  • 30. OUR AUTHORS STUDY CLUB, INC. MRS. VASSIE D. WRIGHT ( 1899 - 1983 ) FOUNDER OF OUR AUTHORS STUDY CLUB, INC . THE LOS ANGELE S BR ANCH OF THE ASSOCIATION FOR THE STUDY OF AFR ICAN AMER ICAN LIFE AND HISTORY, INC. Mrs. Vassie Davis Wright was born in Paola, Kansas on December 6, 1899. She was the daughter of Samuel William Davis and Lula Ann (Pertilla) Davis. She died on March 20, 1983, in Los Angeles, California. Her education was in the public schools of Denver. She graduated from Western University in Kansas City, Kansas and did her graduate work in Teaching at the University of Kansas. After arriving in California, she attended the University of Southern California Extension and completed courses in Sociology and Business Administration. Mrs. Wright became well known for her abilities as an organizer, socialite, and civic worker. Mrs. Wright and a group of Terminal Annex Postal Employees founded Our Authors Study Club on February 14, 1945 for the purpose of studying the Biographies of African American authors, reviewing their books, and learning the true history of African people in the Diaspora. In June 1945, Dr. Carter G. Woodson chartered the group to be members of his Association for the Study of Negro Life and History, now known as the Association for the Study of African American Life and History, Inc. Mrs. Wright also helped to establish lending libraries in the YMCA, YWCA, and at Second Baptist Church’s Henderson Community Center. Other notable achievements included the first citywide celebration of Negro History Week in Los Angeles and initiating a Black History curriculum in the Los Angeles Unified School District Adult Schools. Mrs. Wright was a real estate broker, a community activist, a Sigma Gamma Rho Sorority, Inc. member, and a very active member of Second Baptist Church. In addition, she was an organizing member of many community groups. In her will, Mrs. Wright left a fund to award fellowships to Ph.D. candidates doing research on African American life, literature, history, and/or culture. At left, Phoebe Beasley, To Have and To Hold, Mixed media collage on canvas, 1983, California African American Museum, Gift of Reginald C. Govan 31
  • 31. Bryan Tilford, The Baptism, Charcoal, newspaper, and pastel on canvas board, 20” x 24”, 2012
  • 32. CIT Y OF LOS ANGELES / 2013 AFRICAN AMERICAN HERITAGE MONTH CELEBR ATION AFRICAN AMERICAN HERITAGE MONTH OPENING CEREMONY WITH OUR AUTHORS STUDY CLUB, INC. Join Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa and Our Authors Study Club, Inc. to acknowledge the outstanding contributions of African Americans in our community. WHEN: February 8, 2013, 10:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m. WHERE: Fletcher Bowron Square, 300 North Main Street (Northeast Corner of Temple and Main), Los Angeles, CA 90012 COST: Free SPONSOR: City of Los Angeles, Office of Mayor Villaraigosa and Our Authors Study Club, Inc. INFO: ourauthorsstudyclub@gmail.com BL ACK HISTORY BUS TOUR OF LOS ANGELE S The tour follows the progress of the African American community in Los Angeles. It includes the Biddy Mason Wall, Sugar Hill, The Island, Central Avenue, Leimert Park, and other locations throughout the City. WHEN: February 9, 2013, 8:00 a.m. – 3:00 p.m. WHERE: Leaving from Consolidated Realty (Baldwin Hills), 3725 Don Felipe at Stocker, Los Angeles COST: Free SPONSOR: Our Authors Study Club, Inc., Consolidated Realty INFO: ourauthorsstudyclub@gmail.com 33
  • 33. CIT Y OF LOS ANGELES / 2013 AFRICAN AMERICAN HERITAGE MONTH CELEBR ATION Kraig Blue, Masai Gen-Isis, Oil on canvas, 8” x 10”, 2007 DR . CARTER G. WOODSON SCHOL ARSHIP AND AWARDS LUNCHEON Scholarships are awarded to deserving student attending college. The event will also recognize African American Community icons. WHEN: WHERE: Marina del Rey Marriott Hotel, Bayview Room 4100 Admiralty Way, Marina del Rey COST: Call for information SPONSOR: Northrop Grumman Foundation, Union Bank Foundation, Nestle’ USA, Sempra Energy, The Nielson Company, Los Angeles Sentinel, Brotherhood Crusade, U.S. Bank INFO: 34 February 9, 2013, 11:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m. ourauthorsstudyclub@gmail.com
  • 34. OUR AUTHORS STUDY CLUB EVENTS ANNUAL BL ACK HISTORY MONTH OR ATORICAL CONTE ST This contest showcases student in grades 10 through 12 attending Los Angeles County high schools. The students will compete for scholarship prizes by reciting their speeches based on the 2013 African American History Month theme: “At the Crossroads of Freedom and Equality: The Emancipation Proclamation and the March on Washington.” WHEN: March 16, 2013, 10:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m. WHERE: Lewis Metropolitan C.M.E. Church, 4900 S. Western, Los Angeles COST: Free SPONSOR: Our Authors Study Club, Inc., Sigma Gamma Rho Sorority, Inc. INFO: ourauthorsstudyclub@gmail.com BRE AKFAST WITH OUR SCHOL ARS Scholars are invited to meet corporate sponsors and mentors. WHEN: July 2013. Date To Be Announced. WHERE: Marina del Rey Hotel, 13534 Bali Way, Marina del Rey COST: Free SPONSOR: Our Authors Study Club, Northrop Grumman Foundation, Union Bank Foundation, Los Angeles Sentinel, Brotherhood Crusade Nestle’ USA, Sempra Energy, The Nielson Company, U. S. Bank INFO: ourauthorsstudyclub@gmail.com Miles Regis, Turned Us Around, Oil and latex on canvas, 60” x 72” 35
  • 35. Toni Scott, at left, Delia Dem Dayz Was Hell Slave Narrative, at right, Delia Slave Daughter of Renty 2, both, Photo collage, 2010
  • 36. Toni Scott, Faith, Hope and Prayer – Artist Sam Sarpong, Photograph, 2009
  • 37. CIT Y OF LOS ANGELES / 2013 AFRICAN AMERICAN HERITAGE MONTH CELEBR ATION 201 North Figueroa Street, Suite 1400 Los Angeles, California 90012 TEL 213.202.5500 FAX 213.202.5517 WEB culturela.org COLORFUL ANTICS A group show featuring the work of African American artist Duane Paul. WHEN: Through February 16, Tuesdays through Saturdays 10:00 a.m. – 6:00 p.m. SITE: George Billis Gallery LA, 2716 S. La Cienega Blvd., Los Angeles COST: Free SPONSOR: George Billis Gallery LA INFO: 310-838-3685, www.georgebillis.com ART DYSON : A PIONEER OF BL ACK HAIR CARE An art exhibition that celebrates Art Dyson, pioneer of Black hair care and founder of Soul Scissors chain. WHEN: Through February 28, 9:00 a.m. – 7:00 p.m. SITE: Dysonna City Art Gallery, 5373 Wilshire Blvd., Los Angeles COST: Free SPONSOR: Donna Dyson INFO: 323-857-0030, www.dysonnacityartgallery.com 39
  • 38. CIT Y OF LOS ANGELES / 2013 AFRICAN AMERICAN HERITAGE MONTH CELEBR ATION Benita Elliot, Sam’s Bike, Photograph, 16” x 12”, 2009 THE 90 THAT BUILT L A This exhibition, celebrates the 90-year history of the Los Angeles Urban League and presents the works and collections of 90 individuals who have helped shape the fabric of LA over the last century. Some of the inductees include Earvin “Magic” Johnson, Berry Gordy, Stevie Wonder, Congresswoman Maxine Waters, Nancy Wilson, and many more. The exhibit will run dynamic special events to explore several topics that have influenced and impacted the African American community. WHEN: Through March 7, Thursdays through Sundays 12:00 noon – 5:00 p.m. SITE: Museum of African American Art, Macy’s Baldwin Hills, 3rd Floor, 3650 W. Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd., Los Angeles COST: Free SPONSOR: Los Angeles Urban League & Time Warner Cable INFO: 323-294-7071, www.theleague90.com SAMPLING THE MICROSCOPIC ART WORK OF WILL ARD WIGAN The California African American Museum (CAAM) presents the remarkable work a U.K. micro-sculptor Willard Wigan. This new and highly unusual exhibition is a mind-bending, blend of art and science that features unique sculptures that are so small they can fit in the eye of a needle, on a pinhead, or on the tip of an eyelash. These sculptures are the results of a unique process that requires Wigan to enter into a deep meditative state to reduce hand tremors and allow him to sculpt between pulse beats. The exhibition includes micro-sculptures, placed for viewing under microscopes, which are comprised of Kevlar, nylon, gold, and eyelashes. WHEN: SITE: California African American Museum, 600 State Dr., Exposition Park, Los Angeles COST: Free SPONSOR: California African American Museum INFO: 40 Through March 17, Tuesdays through Saturdays 10:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m., Sundays 11:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. 213-744-7432, www.caamuseum.org
  • 39. Benita Elliott, DC Memories, Photo illustration and photography, 10” x 6”, 2012
  • 40. CIT Y OF LOS ANGELES / 2013 AFRICAN AMERICAN HERITAGE MONTH CELEBR ATION COLORING AMERICA : SELEC TIONS FROM THE CALIFORNIA AFRICAN AMERICAN MUSEUM’S PERMANENT HISTORY COLLEC TION The exhibition highlights four thematic sections from the permanent collection of the California African American Museum – West Africa and the African Diaspora, Local History, Sports, and Entertainment. It also includes a variety of relevant historical objects and artworks donated to or purchased by the Museum, such as African masks, instruments, artifacts related to Mayor Tom Bradley, historical sports memorabilia, and pieces from the Ken Renard Collection. WHEN: Through March 24, Tuesdays through Saturdays 10:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m., Sundays 11:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. SITE: California African American Museum, 600 State Dr., Exposition Park, Los Angeles COST: Free SPONSOR: California African American Museum INFO: 213-744-7432, www.caamuseum.org SALUTE TO TUSKEGEE AIRMEN The exhibition pays tribute to the members of the squadron that served during War World II. WHEN: SITE: Flight Path Museum, 6661 W. Imperial Hwy., Los Angeles COST: Free SPONSOR: Flight Path Learning Center & Los Angeles World Airports INFO: 42 Through March 31, Tuesdays through Saturdays 10:00 a.m. – 3:00 p.m. 424-646-7284, www.flightpath.us
  • 41. FEBRUARY EVENTS Janet Dandridge, A Long Walk, Photograph GO TELL IT ON THE MOUNTAIN The exhibition examines Christianity’s impactful fostering of political, public interaction as well as engagement. This curator inspired exhibition revolves around the experiences of the characters in James Baldwin’s 1953 novel of the same name, Go Tell It on the Mountain, which incorporates the underlying tensions of religious control, faith, family, hope and human hypocrisy. The show exhibits the work of 15 artists, some of whom were formally trained or self-taught, and includes pieces that were created for the artists’ selfsatisfaction. Artists are from different ethnic backgrounds, giving the exhibit diversity in style and technique. WHEN: Through April 7, Tuesdays through Saturdays 10:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m., Sundays 11:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. SITE: California African American Museum, 600 State Dr., Exposition Park, Los Angeles COST: Free SPONSOR: California African American Museum INFO: 213-744-7432, www.caamuseum.org Edward Ewell, detail from Graffiti Madness, Photograph 43
  • 42. L. Marietta, at top, Clarity, Oil, 12” x 12”, 2011, below, Griffith Park Observatory, Oil, 12” x 12”, 2006
  • 43. FEBRUARY EVENTS Bryan Tilford, Remembering Gil Scott, Acrylic and newspaper on canvas board, 20” x 24”, 2012 AFRICAN AMERICAN MILITARY PORTR AITS FROM THE AMERICAN CIVIL WAR : SELEC TED IMAGES FROM THE LIBR ARY OF CONGRE SS COLLEC TIONS As America’s Civil War approaches its 150th anniversary, the California African American Museum will celebrate the participation of the approximately 180,000 African American soldiers in the civil war. The exhibits are reproduced images in large formats from the original antique photographs, and are selections from the Liljenquist Family Collection of Civil War Photographs and the Gladstone Collection of African American Photographs, both of which are housed at the Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. The show provides an unusual glimpse of African Americans in the American Civil War, rarely seen by the public. This exhibition tells the stories of African American soldiers and sailors of the Union who fought against the Confederates for the freedom of those still enslaved. WHEN: Through April 14, Tuesdays through Saturdays 10:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m., Sundays 11:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. SITE: California African American Museum, 600 State Dr., Exposition Park, Los Angeles COST: Free SPONSOR: California African American Museum INFO: 213-744-7432, www.caamuseum.org 45
  • 44. CIT Y OF LOS ANGELES / 2013 AFRICAN AMERICAN HERITAGE MONTH CELEBR ATION Dolores Johnson, Dancers, Etching and aquatint, 12” x 6”, 2000 21ST ANNUAL PAN AFRICAN FILM & ARTS FE STIVAL America’s largest black film festival showcasing over 150 new films from Africa, the United States, Europe, the Caribbean, the South Pacific, South America, and Canada. This event also features 100 black fine artists and craftspeople from the world over, poetry, fashion shows, free forums, and panels. WHEN: February 7 - 18, Time Varies SITE: Rave Cinema at Baldwin Hills Crenshaw Plaza, 3650 W. Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd., Los Angeles COST: Varies by event SPONSOR: Pan African Film & Arts Festival INFO: 310-337-4737, www.PAFF.org AFRICAN HELIX STITCH & OTHER MATH IDE AS Learn about African helix stitch (seed beading) and other mathematical crafts and games. This workshop is geared towards teens. WHEN: SITE: Lincoln Heights Branch, 2530 Workman St., Los Angeles COST: Free SPONSOR: Lincoln Heights Branch INFO: 46 February 8, 4:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m. 323-226-1694, www.lapl.org
  • 45. FEBRUARY EVENTS AKOSUA BANDELE & MARVIN SIN Zambezi Bazzar celebrates 20 years of culture, community, and creativity. The event will feature the work of Akosua Bandele and Marvin Sin. WHEN: February 8, 9, 10, Friday 5:30 p.m. – 8:30 p.m., Saturday and Sunday 12:00 noon – 7:00 p.m. SITE: Zambezi Bazzar, 4334 Degnan Blvd., Los Angeles COST: Free INFO: 323-299-6383 HE ALING THE WOUNDS OF AMERICAN SL AVERY Heaven on Earth Productions presents a free soul food luncheon and discussion entitled: Healing the Wounds of American Slavery. The discussion, which explores the residual effects of American slavery on today’s African American, male/female relationships, will be taped for inclusion in a series entitled “Healing the Wounds of American Slavery.” WHEN: February 9, 11:30 a.m. – 1:30 p.m. SITE: Baldwin Hill Branch Library, 2906 S. La Brea Ave., Los Angeles COST: Free SPONSOR: Heaven on Earth Productions INFO: 323-733-1196, www.lapl.org Bernard Hoyes, Possession Scene, Photograph 47
  • 46. CIT Y OF LOS ANGELES / 2013 AFRICAN AMERICAN HERITAGE MONTH CELEBR ATION Joseph Beckles, Untitled, Welded steel, 15” x 7” x 7”, 1998 ART WORKSHOP: BE ADS OF FAITH Artist Ronald Jackson facilitates an art workshop on making rosaries, prayer beads, and other symbolic and/or sacred bead items. WHEN: February 9, 2:00 p.m. SITE: California African American Museum, 600 State Dr., Exposition Park, Los Angeles COST: Free, RSVP Preferred SPONSOR: California African American Museum INFO: 213-744-7432, www.caamuseum.org A VALENTINE’S DAY TRIBUTE TO SAM COOKE Join the Madrid Theatre for a trip down memory lane starring renowned recording artist Mike Majik Boyd performing the well-loved songs of Sam Cooke. Joining Mr. Boyd are Harry Shahoian, straight from Las Vegas, performing the songs of Elvis Presley; King James Brown performing the soulful music of James Brown; Ernie Valens performing the songs of his cousin, San Fernando Valley’s own Ritchie Valens; and SIRE performing the sultry music of Barry White. The show will benefit the Boys & Girls Club of East LA and LIFE Choir. WHEN: SITE: Madrid Theatre, 21622 Sherman Way, Canoga Park COST: $40 General, $75 VIP SPONSOR: Sam Cooke INFO: 48 February 9, 2:00 p.m., 7:30 p.m. 323-851-1586, www.groovetickets.com
  • 47. John Thomas Riddle Jr., Fifteen, Silkscreen print, 1979, California African American Museum, Golden State Mutual Life Insurance Company Art Collection on loan courtesy California State Insurance Commissioner
  • 48. CIT Y OF LOS ANGELES / 2013 AFRICAN AMERICAN HERITAGE MONTH CELEBR ATION Bryan Tilford, Coltrane at the Guggenheim, Acrylic, conte crayon, newspaper, charcoal and pastel on canvas board, 20” x 24”, 2012 BL ACK HISTORY MONTH PROGR AM The program features the dramatic soprano, Dr. Eleanor Ferguson-Marshalleck, and the Afro-American Chamber Music Society Chamber Ensemble interpreting works by Moore, Jackson-King, Still, and Tillis. WHEN: February 9, 4:00 p.m. SITE: Glendale City Church, 610 E. California Ave., Glendale COST: Freewill Offering SPONSOR: Afro-American Chamber Music Society INFO: 310-671-6400, www.aacms.weebly.com WAYNE SHORTER QUARTET WITH ESPER ANZ A SPALDING AND THE L A PHIL An aural painter of subtlety and vision, jazz legend Wayne Shorter has dazzled audiences and critics alike with his powerful performances at Walt Disney Concert Hall and the Hollywood Bowl. He is a master of structure as well as improvisation, as he reminds us with new works combining his quartet with the LA Phil and charismatic bassist-singer Esperanza Spalding (who includes a song by Shorter on her new album). WHEN: SITE: Walt Disney Concert Hall, 111 S. Grand Ave., Downtown Los Angeles COST: Check website SPONSOR: LA Phil INFO: 50 February 9, 8:00 p.m. 323-850-2000, www.laphil.com
  • 49. FEBRUARY EVENTS Chanel Eddines, at top, Passage 1, below, Passage 2, both Oil on canvas, 48” x 24”, 2012 51
  • 50. CIT Y OF LOS ANGELES / 2013 AFRICAN AMERICAN HERITAGE MONTH CELEBR ATION Marcella Swett, at top, His Tighties, below, I Burned My Bra Now I Want It Back, both, Acrylic on wood panel, 2006 52
  • 51. FEBRUARY EVENTS LUCKMAN JA ZZ ORCHESTR A FE ATURING CARMEN LUNDY Celebrated jazz vocalist and composer Carmen Lundy joins the Luckman Jazz Orchestra in a tribute performance to the incomparable Jimmy Heath. During his five decade career, Heath has performed with jazz greats including Howard McGhee, Dizzy Gillespie, Miles Davis, and Wynton Marsalis. Heath performed on more than 100 albums and wrote more than 125 compositions. WHEN: February 9, 8:00 p.m. SITE: Luckman Fine Arts Complex, California State University, Los Angeles, 5151 State University Dr., Los Angeles COST: $25 - $40 SPONSOR: Luckman Fine Arts Complex INFO: 323-343-6600, www.luckmanarts.org ARKESTRY OF THE COSMOS – THE UNIVERSE L ANGUAGE OF SUN R A The exhibition includes a collection of photographs, videos, albums, articles, and art on Sun Ra and his Arkestra. The exhibition includes the archives, art, and interviews on Sun Ra, members of the “Ark” and their quest to expand minds, music, and the souls through musical experimentation. The show celebrates the life and work of African American composers and is in conjunction with Music LA African American Heritage Music Education Program. WHEN: February 9 through April 20, Opening Exhibition February 9, 3:00 p.m., Gallery Hours Mondays through Sundays 12:00 noon – 5:00 p.m. SITE: William Grant Still Arts Center, 2520 S. West View St., Los Angeles COST: Free SPONSOR: City of Los Angeles Department of Cultural Affairs & William Grant Still Arts Center INFO: 323-847-1540 LOS ANGELES PIONEERS : GOLDEN STATE MUTUAL’S HISTORIC MUR AL , PART II Designed Historical Cultural Monument 1000, this Hale Woodruff mural depicts The Negro in California History – Settlement and Development, from 1850 to 1949. Join the museum for this scholarly discourse. WHEN: February 10, 2:00 p.m. SITE: California African American Museum, 600 State Dr., Exposition Park, Los Angeles COST: Free. RSVP Preferred SPONSOR: California African American Museum INFO: 213-744-7432, www.caamuseum.org 53
  • 52. CIT Y OF LOS ANGELES / 2013 AFRICAN AMERICAN HERITAGE MONTH CELEBR ATION Charles Dickson, Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow, Domestic wood, 18” x 39” x 12”, 2005 SAR AK ASI AFRICAN ACROBATS Celebrate the rich diversity of the African continent and the festive spirit of the circus in one exhilarating extravaganza. The Sarakasi African Acrobats dazzle in a kaleidoscopic showcase filled with human pyramids, tightrope stunts, contortionists, high-energy dance, and juggling. A riveting display of athleticism and authentic African music and customs, the show captivates audiences of all ages. WHEN: SITE: Cerritos Center for the Performing Arts, 12700 Center Court Dr., Cerritos COST: $20 - $50 SPONSOR: Cerritos Center for the Performing Arts INFO: 54 February 10, 3:00 p.m. 562-467-8818, www.cerritoscenter.com
  • 53. Justin Bua, Bass Player, Acrylic on canvas, 66” x 44”, 2007
  • 54. CIT Y OF LOS ANGELES / 2013 AFRICAN AMERICAN HERITAGE MONTH CELEBR ATION Sharon J. Williams, Watts Winter Wonderland Ariel #3, Oil on canvas, 24” x 30”, 2006 LUCY’S LEGACY: THE HIDDEN TRE ASURE OF ETHIOPIA Lucy’s Legacy gives visitors the opportunity to further their understanding and place in the human family. Discovered in the late 20th century in Ethiopia, Lucy is the oldest and most complete adult fossil of a human ancestor that has been found in Africa to date. Although Lucy is only 40% complete, her species provides a likely evolutionary link to the homo genus from which human beings evolved. The discovery of Lucy not only provided this link, but also gives scientists a visible example of just how evolution and its effects can be traced in one specimen. WHEN: February 10 through May 12, Tuesdays through Sundays 10:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m. SITE: Bowers Museum, 2002 N. Main St., Santa Ana COST: Weekdays: $13 Adults, $10 Seniors and Students, Children under 12 Free; Weekends: $15 Adults, $12 Seniors and Students, Children under 12 free SPONSOR: Bowers Museum INFO: 714-567-3600, www.bowers.org MARDI GR AS A celebration of “Fat Tuesday” Olvera Street style with a children’s carnival. The event includes Brazilian singing and dancing, a festive parade, and mask making workshops. WHEN: SITE: El Pueblo Historical Monument, 125 Paseo de la Plaza, Los Angeles COST: Free SPONSOR: El Pueblo Historical Monument INFO: 56 February 12, 9:00 a.m. – 2:00 p.m. 213-485-8372, www.calleolvera.com
  • 55. FEBRUARY EVENTS ALLEN TOUSSAINT BAND We’re serving it up in style All On A Mardi Gras Day with a pre-show crawfish boil and party on the Royce terrace and two spectacular flavors of New Orleans music. American songwriter and producer Allen Toussaint is one of the most influential figures in New Orleans R&B. An evening sharing stories and hits— including Working in the Coalmine, Lady Marmalade, and Southern Nights alongside songs from his 2010 Grammy nominee. WHEN: February 12, 8:00 p.m. SITE: Center for the Art of Performance at UCLA, Royce Hall, 340 Royce Dr., West Los Angeles COST: $20 - $60, $15 UCLA students SPONSOR: Center for the Art of Performance at UCLA INFO: 310-825-2101, www.cap.ucla.edu Miles Regis, Face Truth, Oil and latex on canvas, 60” x 72” 57
  • 56. CIT Y OF LOS ANGELES / 2013 AFRICAN AMERICAN HERITAGE MONTH CELEBR ATION Yrneh Gabon Brown, My Story, Bronze VALENTINE’S DAY CELEBR ATION OF AFRICAN AMERICAN ACHIEVEMENT See a timeline of laws affecting equal rights and resulting African American successes. Hear a brief presentation from Cheryl Eckford, niece of Elizabeth Eckford who was one of the Little Rock Nine. WHEN: February 14, 4:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m. SITE: Harbor City – Harbor Gateway Branch, 24000 S. Western Ave., Los Angeles COST: Free SPONSOR: Branch Children’s and Young Adults Librarians INFO: 310-534-9520, www.harbor-peoples.blogspot.com AFRICAN AMERICAN HERITAGE CELEBR ATION This afternoon celebration includes poetry, storytelling, live gospel, jazz, and blues. African artifacts for sale such as kente cloth, mud cloth, soapstone, handmade masks, and tribal earrings add an authentic flavor to the event. WHEN: SITE: Angelus Plaza, 255 S. Hill St., Downtown Los Angeles (4th floor Auditorium) COST: Free SPONSOR: Angelus Plaza INFO: 58 February 15, 2:00 p.m. - 4:00 p.m. 213-623-4352 x317
  • 57. FEBRUARY EVENTS Duane Paul, at left, Compensation, at right, Compensation Embrace, both, Photograph, archival paper, 18” x 24”, 2012 CONVERSATIONS AT CA AM A panel discussion exploring the future of Black politics in the United States. WHEN: February 16, 1:00 p.m. SITE: California African American Museum 600 State Dr., Exposition Park, Los Angeles COST: Free SPONSOR: California African American Museum INFO: 213-744-7432, www.caamuseum.org FAMILY WORKSHOP WAT TS LIBR ARY “ART IN A BOX” Look at LACMA’s collection of African American art and be inspired by the sketchbook that once belonged to Los Angeles artist and activist Ruth Waddy (1909-2003). Artist Cedric Adams call the sketchbook a “time capsule” of the advent of the black arts movement. WHEN: February 16, 2:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m. SITE: Alma Reaves Woods – Watts Branch Library, 10205 Compton Ave., Los Angeles COST: Free SPONSOR: Los Angeles Public Library & Los Angeles County Museum of Art INFO: 323-932-5866 59
  • 58. George Evans, In Defense of Home, Mixed media
  • 59. FEBRUARY EVENTS Duane Paul, Compensation, Photograph, archival paper, 18” x 24”, 2012 QUEEN AMINAH’S CULTUR AL CLOTHING & SISTER’S MARKETPL ACE This cultural marketplace offers a wide selection of fabrics, West African artifacts, wood and stone sculptures, masks, jewelry, and cultural gifts. The event features food and a stunning fashion show. WHEN: February 16, 2:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m. SITE: Queen Aminah’s Cultural Clothing & Sister’s Marketplace, 4339 Degnan Blvd., Los Angeles COST: Free SPONSOR: Queen Aminah’s Cultural Clothing & Sister’s Marketplace INFO: 323-762-3371 2 N D ANNUAL CARTER G. WOODSON BL ACK HISTORY PROGR AM The event celebrates and highlights the African American culture while re-framing how African Americans view their own history. WHEN: February 16, 4:00 p.m. – 6:30 p.m. SITE: Martin Luther King Jr. Hospital, Multipurpose Room COST: Free SPONSOR: Omega PSI PHI Fraternity Inc. & Tau Tau Chapter INFO: www.ques-tautau.org 61
  • 60. CIT Y OF LOS ANGELES / 2013 AFRICAN AMERICAN HERITAGE MONTH CELEBR ATION Andre Ajibade, Dana Lindquist Singer, Prisma colors on illustration board THE TEMP TATIONS The unique a capella Doo-Wop sound of Street Corner Renaissance has propelled its singles, including Life Could Be a Dream, up the Billboard charts. The group opens for The Temptations, returning to the Cerritos Center for the Performing Arts with its timeless tunes. The Grammy-winning quintet set the bar for Soul and R&B groups with an avalanche of hits, including The Way You Do the Things You Do, My Girl, and Papa Was a Rolling Stone. WHEN: February 16, 8:00 p.m. SITE: Cerritos Center for the Performing Arts, 12700 Center Court Dr., Cerritos COST: $40 - $80 SPONSOR: Cerritos Center for the Performing Arts INFO: 562-467-8818, www.cerritoscenter.com BANANAS : A DAY IN THE LIFE OF JOSEPHINE BAKER Multiple NAACP award-winning actress/playwright Sloan Robinson brings this fascinating woman to brilliant life. Robinson reminds audiences of what made Baker a legend, rebel, and leader in African Americans’ fight for equality in the arts and their freedom to truly live their lives at will. WHEN: SITE: Santa Monica Playhouse Main Stage, 1211 4th St., Santa Monica COST: $20 SPONSOR: Santa Monica Playhouse & Do It Yourself Productions INFO: 62 February 16 & 17, Saturday 8:00 p.m., Sunday 3:00 p.m. 310-394-9779 ext. 1, www.santamonicaplayhouse.com
  • 61. FEBRUARY EVENTS Bryan Tilford, The Bassist, Acrylic and newspaper on canvas board, 12” x 16”, 2012 AFRO -L ATIN CL ASSICS As part of Target Free Sundays, the Museum of Latin American Art announces the AfroAmerican Chamber Ensemble playing works by Garcia, Johnson, Still, Gines, and White. WHEN: February 17, 12:00 noon SITE: Museum of Latin American Art, 628 Alamitos Ave., Long Beach COST: Free SPONSOR: Target INFO: 310-671-6400, www.aacms.weebly.com 63
  • 62. CIT Y OF LOS ANGELES / 2013 AFRICAN AMERICAN HERITAGE MONTH CELEBR ATION Civil War Photographic Portrait Exhibit, California African American Museum, At top, Union Private and Family, Quarter-plate Ambrotype taken between 1863 - 1865, below, Union Private at Benton Barracks, Missouri, Quarter-Plate Hand Tinted Tintype taken by photographer Enoch Long, between 1863 - 1865, Images are from the Liljenquist Family Collection of Civil War Photographs, Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division, Washington, D.C. 64
  • 63. FEBRUARY EVENTS LOS ANGELES PIONEERS : THE LIFE AND LEGACY OF THE HONOR ABLE TOM BR ADLEY – MAYOR OF LOS ANGELE S Curator Susan D. Anderson will discuss Mayor Bradley’s illustrious career in public service in Los Angeles. WHEN: February 17, 2:00 p.m. SITE: California African American Museum 600 State Dr., Exposition Park, Los Angeles COST: Free. RSVP preferred SPONSOR: California African American Museum INFO: 213-744-7432, www.caamuseum.org BL ACK SYMPHONISTS CONCERT The event includes a silent auction of African sculptures and art, a pre-concert lecture with composer Jeraldine Herbison, and a viola concert with Stefan Smith. WHEN: February 17, 3:00 p.m. SITE: First Presbyterian Church, 100 N. Hillcrest Blvd., Inglewood COST: $30 General, $15 Students SPONSOR: Afro-American Chamber Music Society INFO: 310-671-6400, www.aacms.weebly.com BL ACK HISTORY MONTH TRIBUTE RECEP TION AND LEC TURE WITH HARI JONES Curator Hari Jones will focus on the 150th Anniversary of the Emancipation Proclamation, the fight to pass the 13th Amendment to end slavery, and the critical role played by African Americans in the Civil War. WHEN: February 20, 5:30 p.m. SITE: California African American Museum 600 State Dr., Exposition Park, Los Angeles COST: Free SPONSOR: California African American Museum INFO: 213-744-7432, www.caamuseum.org FAMILY BL ACK HISTORY STORY TELLING Enjoy songs and stories from African American history and tradition, with storyteller Marilyn Miller. WHEN: February 20, 4:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m. SITE: Eagle Rock Branch Library, 5027 Caspar Ave., Los Angeles COST: Free SPONSOR: Friends of Eagle Rock Library INFO: 323-258-8078, www.lapl.org 65
  • 64. CIT Y OF LOS ANGELES / 2013 AFRICAN AMERICAN HERITAGE MONTH CELEBR ATION Chanel Eddines, Last Drop, Oil on canvas, 48” x 36”, 2012 AFRO - AMERICAN CHAMBER MUSIC SOCIET Y ORCHE STR A CONCERT A chamber music concert with works by Sancho, St. Georges, Sowande, and Still. WHEN: February 21, 12:00 noon – 1:00 p.m. SITE: USC Fisher Museum, USC Campus, 823 Exposition Blvd., Los Angeles COST: Free SPONSOR: Afro-American Chamber Music Society INFO: 310-671-6400, www.aacms.weebly.com BONES AND BLUES Bones and Blues is a monthly concert series featuring live blues and jazz music, domino tournaments, and a hearty barbecue dinner. WHEN: SITE: The Center, 10950 S. Central Ave., Los Angeles COST: $25 Door, $15 Pre-sale SPONSOR: Watts Labor Community Action Committee (WLCAC) INFO: 66 February 22, 8:00 p.m. 323-563-5639, www.wlcac.org
  • 65. Kohshin Finley, Notorious, House paint, acrylic paint, and acrylic ink mounted on canvas, 24” x 30”, 2012
  • 66. CIT Y OF LOS ANGELES / 2013 AFRICAN AMERICAN HERITAGE MONTH CELEBR ATION Lili Bernard, Christ of Empathy, Oil on canvas, 48” x 36” L APD AFRICAN AMERICAN JOB FAIR AND HIRING SEMINAR Come meet LAPD officers, recruiters, and mentors and see what it takes to become a Los Angeles Police Officer. Receive valuable information about various career paths and physical preparation at the Q&A Session hosted by LAPD officers. Those in attendance will have the opportunity to take the first step to this rewarding career by taking the written exam. WHEN: SITE: Crenshaw Christian Center, 7901 S. Vermont Ave., Los Angeles COST: Free SPONSOR: Los Angeles Police Department INFO: 68 February 23, Information Session at 9:00 am, Written Test at 7:00 a.m. & 11:00 a.m. 866-444-LAPD, www.joinLAPD.com
  • 67. FEBRUARY EVENTS WORLD CIT Y – STEP AFRIK A ! World City is the Music Center’s highly acclaimed free performance series reflecting the rich array of cultures making up the Los Angeles community. In addition to performances, free arts workshops for children are offered in the adjacent Blue Ribbon Garden. Step Afrika! is a high energy performance with roots in African dance and military marching. The performance includes a South African gumboot dance, a South African Zulu dance, and routines in collegiate step traditions practiced by men and women all across the United States. WHEN: February 23, 11:00 a.m. & 12:30 p.m. SITE: W. M. Keck Foundation Children’s Amphitheatre, Walt Disney Concert Hall, 111 S. Grand Ave., Downtown Los Angeles COST: Free SPONSOR: The Music Center INFO: 213-972-4396, www.musiccenter.org SUNSHINE DRUM CIRCLE STORIES – STORIE S AND RHY THMS FROM AROUND THE WORLD Storyteller Ina Buckner-Barnett and master percussionist “Chazz” Ross present a musical adventure with stories, songs, rhythm, and movement. WHEN: February 23, 2:00 p.m. SITE: Los Angeles Central Library, Mark Taper Auditorium, 630 W. 5th St., Los Angeles COST: Free SPONSOR: Children’s Literature Department INFO: 213-228-7253, www.lapl.org Michael Massenburg, LA Style, Mixed media, 29” x 39”, 2012 69
  • 68. CIT Y OF LOS ANGELES / 2013 AFRICAN AMERICAN HERITAGE MONTH CELEBR ATION At top, Ronald Jackson, Diana Ross, Acrylic on recycled computer box, 15” x 15”, below, Sharon Williams, Watts Winter Wonderland Ariel #2, Mixed media, oil and rice on canvas, 25” x 30”, 2006 70
  • 69. FEBRUARY EVENTS BL ACK HISTORY CELEBR ATES THE AFRICAN DRUM Learn the history of the African drum and make your own. Join the library for games, gifts, and prizes. Reservations are required. WHEN: February 23, 2:00 p.m. SITE: Exposition Park – Dr. Mary McLeod Bethune Regional Library, 3900 S. Western Ave., Los Angeles COST: Free SPONSOR: An Urban Rap Workshop, ISIS-SA INFO: 323-290-3113, www.lapl.org ROBERT R ANDOLPH PRESENTS THE SLIDE BROTHERS Robert Randolph - the exciting pedal-steel guitar player known for an effortless mix of blues, gospel, and funk - presents a new project with the Slide Brothers, the legendary masters who first inspired Randolph’s commitment to “Sacred Steel.” This sub-genre was born when steel guitars were brought to the House of God Church during the ’40s to replace the traditional organ. He’s bringing the progenitors of the form - Calvin Cooke, Aubrey Ghent, Chuck, and Darick Campbell - center stage for an evening of infectious, uplifting music. WHEN: February 23, 8:00 p.m. SITE: Center for the Art of Performance at UCLA, Royce Hall, 340 Royce Dr., West Los Angeles COST: $15 - $50, $15 UCLA students SPONSOR: Center for the Art of Performance at UCLA INFO: 310-825-2101, www.cap.ucla.edu AFRICAN AMERICAN FESTIVAL Join the Aquarium of the Pacific during its eleventh annual African American Festival, celebrating African American and African cultures. The event features hip hop and break dancers, tap dancing, Mardi Gras second line dancers, jazz, interactive drum circles, West African dance, cultural storytelling, ethnic food, arts and crafts, and the Heritage Award ceremony. WHEN: February 23 & 24, 9:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. SITE: Aquarium of the Pacific, 100 Aquarium Way, Long Beach COST: $25.95 Adults, ages 12 and up, $22.95 Seniors, $14.95 Children (3 -11), Free children under 3 and Aquarium members SPONSOR: Aquarium of the Pacific INFO: 562-590-3100, www.aquariumofpacific.org 71
  • 70. CIT Y OF LOS ANGELES / 2013 AFRICAN AMERICAN HERITAGE MONTH CELEBR ATION Walter Henry Williams, Marguerites, Color woodcut, 1961, California African American Museum, Gift of Dr. and Mrs. Leon O. Banks ONE WHO WALKED THE WALK: THE TRIUMPHANT LIFE OF BIDDY MASON Terilyn Lawson closely examines Biddy Mason’s incredulous life. WHEN: February 24, 2:00 p.m. SITE: California African American Museum 600 State Dr., Exposition Park, Los Angeles COST: Free. RSVP preferred SPONSOR: California African American Museum INFO: 213-744-7432, www.caamuseum.org LIFE IS A SA XOPHONE Celebrate the 28th anniversary of Life is a Saxophone, featuring the legendary poet Kamau Daaood, a film by S. Pearl Sharp. The event also includes special guest performances hosted by Food4Thot & Socks. WHEN: SITE: Still Waters @ The Event Center, 817 La Brea Ave., Inglewood COST: $20 In advance; $25 at the door SPONSOR: Still Waters Events INFO: 72 February 24, Award reception 6:00 p.m., Film 7:00 p.m., Performance 8:45 p.m. 424-646-3334, www.stillwatersevents.com
  • 71. FEBRUARY EVENTS SABLE IMAGES, INC. This retail mini museum features historical African American memorabilia, antiques, collectables, retrospective art, heritage books, rare dolls, cookie jars, and memorable gifts. The event will present the exhibition American History Comes Alive Through Black Memorabilia. WHEN: February 24, Call for times SITE: Sable Images, Inc., 4339 Degnan Blvd., Los Angeles COST: Free SPONSOR: Sable Images, Inc. INFO: 323-370-3664 FREEDOM QUILTS If you were escaping using the Underground Railroad would you know how to read the helpful codes provided? WHEN: February 26, 4:30 p.m. – 5:30 p.m. SITE: TeenScape, Central Library, 630 W. 5th St., Los Angeles COST: Free SPONSOR: TeenScape INFO: 213-228-7290, www.lapl.org MUSICAL PERFORMANCE The show will feature a variety of African American music and songs. WHEN: February 27, 4:00 p.m. SITE: Vernon Branch Library, 4504 S. Central Ave., Los Angeles COST: Free SPONSOR: Vernon Branch Library INFO: 323-234-9106, www.lapl.org Janet E. Dandridge, at left, Hazy Low One, at right, Hazy Low Two, Photo collage 73
  • 72. CIT Y OF LOS ANGELES / 2013 AFRICAN AMERICAN HERITAGE MONTH CELEBR ATION Jacques Enguerrand-Gourgue, The Apple, Oil on board, California African American Museum, Gift of Enid Kent and Hod Schudson 74
  • 73. MARCH EVENTS Matthew Thomas, Three World Views as One, 2007, California African American Museum, Gift of the artist JUAN DE MARCOS & THE AFRO CUBAN ALL STARS The award-winning Afro-Cuban All Stars has delighted multitudes of fans with its intoxicating Bolero, Cha Cha Cha, Salsa, Rumba, Danzón, and Timba music. Staunchly committed to showcasing the heritage, vitality, and diversity of Cuba’s tunes to the world, the Grammynominated band “electrifies!” hails the San Francisco Chronicle. WHEN: March 1, 8:00 p.m. SITE: Cerritos Center for the Performing Arts, 12700 Center Court Dr., Cerritos COST: $30 - $65 SPONSOR: Cerritos Center for the Performing Arts INFO: 562-467-8818, www.cerritoscenter.com TARGET SUNDAY – WOMAN FIRST: A TRIBUTE TO OUR WOMEN TR AILBL A ZERS The museum pays tribute to women of color who pioneered roles traditionally held by men or in male-dominated fields. The program includes an afternoon of performances, including spoken word and dance. WHEN: March 3, 1:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m. SITE: California African American Museum 600 State Dr., Exposition Park, Los Angeles COST: Free SPONSOR: California African American Museum INFO: 213-744-7432, www.caamuseum.org 75
  • 74. CIT Y OF LOS ANGELES / 2013 AFRICAN AMERICAN HERITAGE MONTH CELEBR ATION Donald Bernard, Dance Series 1 INSPIR ATION IN WORDS AND ART Participants will write religious or inspirational sentiments with embellishment for display. Facilitated by Frances Atkins. WHEN: March 9, 2:00 p.m. SITE: California African American Museum 600 State Dr., Exposition Park, Los Angeles COST: Free SPONSOR: California African American Museum INFO: 213-744-7432, www.caamuseum.org CARL HANCOCK RUX: E XCEP TS FORM THE E X ALTED Carl Hancock Rux is a multiple award-winning poet, playwright, novelist, essayist, and recording artist, whose many collaborators include Robert Wilson, Dr. Bernice Johnson Reagon, Bill T. Jones, and Martha Clarke. He is the recipient of the Herb Alpert Prize, NYFA Prize, and NEA/TCG Artist-in-Residency Fellow. Rux has appeared in films, in dance and contemporary opera. He was the subject of a documentary Coming of Age which received a cine Golden Eagle Award. In an intimate performance, Carl performs excerpts from his new book, The Exalted, a poetic meditation on heritage, love, and the willpower to overcome atrocity. WHEN: SITE: Center for the Art of Performance at UCLA, Glorya Kaufman Theater, 120 Westwood Plaza, Room 200, West Los Angeles COST: $20, $15 UCLA students SPONSOR: Center for the Art of Performance at UCLA INFO: 76 March 9, 8:00 p.m. 310-825-2101, www.cap.ucla.edu
  • 75. MARCH EVENTS Yrneh Gabon Brown, My Story Your Story, Sheet metal, 2011 77
  • 76. CIT Y OF LOS ANGELES / 2013 AFRICAN AMERICAN HERITAGE MONTH CELEBR ATION Michael Massenburg, Mother’s Nature, Mixed medium, 42” x 42”, 2012 DISCOVER YOUR ROOTS 11TH ANNUAL AFRICAN AMERICAN FAMILY HISTORY CONFERENCE Over 35 classes plus online workshops designed to assist both the beginner and advanced genealogist/family historian. Become proficient at genealogical research, write family histories, locate ancestors, and pass on information for posterity. Lunch is included. WHEN: SITE: The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints (Historical Chapel); 1209 S. Manhattan Pl., Los Angeles COST: $30 before February 2, $35 after February 2. Online and mail-in registration SPONSOR: The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints, California African American Genealogical Society, Pasadena Area African American Genealogical Society INFO: 78 March 9, Call for times 310-475-7018, www.discoveryourroots.org
  • 77. MARCH EVENTS INNER WORKING Acclaimed actress and self-described “Inner Fitness Trainer,” Tina Lifford will engage patrons in exercises taken from principles outlined in her new book, The Little Book of BIG LIES. WHEN: March 10, 2:00 p.m. SITE: California African American Museum 600 State Dr., Exposition Park, Los Angeles COST: Free SPONSOR: California African American Museum INFO: 213-744-7432, www.caamuseum.org JA ZZ AT LINCOLN CENTER ORCHESTR A WITH W YNTON MARSALIS One of the world’s pre-eminent large jazz groups – 15 of the finest soloists and ensemble players – the Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra has become an inspiring favorite at Walt Disney Concert Hall and the Hollywood Bowl. Legendary trumpeter, composer, educator, and all-around cultural dynamo Wynton Marsalis co-founded the jazz program at Lincoln Center and serves as Music Director of the orchestra. WHEN: March 12, 8:00 p.m. SITE: Walt Disney Concert Hall, 111 S. Grand Ave., Downtown Los Angeles COST: Check website SPONSOR: LA Phil INFO: 323-850-2000, www.laphil.com Janet E. Dandridge, Wild, Photograph 79
  • 78. CIT Y OF LOS ANGELES / 2013 AFRICAN AMERICAN HERITAGE MONTH CELEBR ATION Herbert Gentry, Carnival, 1985, California African American Museum, Gift of Alitash Kebede Fine Arts 80
  • 79. MARCH EVENTS Janet E. Dandridge, Funky Flower, Photograph MAKING AFRICAN BE AD JEWELRY FOR TEENS Learn how to make jewelry using elastic wire and/or twine. Needles will be used to string the beads together to form the projects that participants are going to make. WHEN: March 14, 4:00 p.m. SITE: Robert Louis Stevenson Branch Library, 803 Spence St., Los Angeles COST: Free SPONSOR: Youth Services Program Box INFO: 323-268-4710, www.lapl.org DOCUMENTARY SCREENING : DAISY BATES, FIRST L ADY OF LIT TLE ROCK (2010) Daisy Bates was a complex, unconventional, and largely forgotten heroine in the modern civil rights movement, who led the charge to desegregate the all-white Central High School in Little Rock, Arkansas. WHEN: March 17, 2:00 p.m. SITE: California African American Museum 600 State Dr., Exposition Park, Los Angeles COST: Free. RSVP preferred SPONSOR: California African American Museum INFO: 213-744-7432, www.caamuseum.org 81
  • 80. CIT Y OF LOS ANGELES / 2013 AFRICAN AMERICAN HERITAGE MONTH CELEBR ATION AN EVENING WITH K ATHLEEN MCGHEE ANDERSON Kathleen McGhee Anderson, an acclaimed playwright, television writer, executive producer, and show runner, has blazed a trail for African American women in television. The museum will celebrate the illustrious career of this talented women who has worked on successful TV shows including: Touched by an Angel, Soul Food, Any Day Now, Lincoln Heights, and many others. WHEN: March 21, 7:00 p.m. SITE: California African American Museum 600 State Dr., Exposition Park, Los Angeles COST: Free. RSVP preferred SPONSOR: California African American Museum INFO: 213-744-7432, www.caamuseum.org AFRICAN AMERICAN FOLK TALES AND PAPER QUILTING Join the library for an afternoon of African American folktales and the art of quilting as form of storytelling. Create a paper quilt to take home. WHEN: March 21, 4:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m. SITE: Benjamin Franklin Branch Library, 2200 E. 1st St., Los Angeles COST: Free SPONSOR: Benjamin Franklin Branch Library INFO: 323-263-6901, www.lapl.org Yrneh Gabon Brown, Weep Not, Bronze 82
  • 81. MARCH EVENTS Verlena Johnson, I Am Love, Mixed Media, 2012 SAVION GLOVER – SOLE SANC TUARY The wildly successful Broadway musical Bring in ’da Noise, Bring in ’da Funk made tap dance sensation Savion Glover a household name. The Seattle Times cheered the “Best Choreography” Tony winner, noting his “restless drive to branch out, [and] change it up.” Glover’s credits include the Broadway hits The Tap Dance Kid, Black and Blue and the Oscar-winning movie Happy Feet. WHEN: March 22, 8:00 p.m. SITE: Cerritos Center for the Performing Arts, 12700 Center Court Dr., Cerritos COST: $30 - $65 SPONSOR: Cerritos Center for the Performing Arts INFO: 562-467-8818, www.cerritoscenter.com 83
  • 82. CIT Y OF LOS ANGELES / 2013 AFRICAN AMERICAN HERITAGE MONTH CELEBR ATION Harvey Johnson, Untitled (After John Biggers) n.d., Oil on board, 1947, California African American Museum, Golden State Mutual Life Insurance Company Art Collection on loan courtesy California State Insurance Commissioner WRITING DOWN THE BONES / AN ALCHEMY OF ARTS & LET TERS Jack Grapes, a respected LA-based poet, writing instructor, and editor of ONTHEBUS, will lead an experimental writing workshop inspired by the art currently on view in Go Tell It on the Mountain exhibit. All genres, ages, and levels of experience are welcome. WHEN: SITE: California African American Museum 600 State Dr., Exposition Park, Los Angeles COST: Free. RSVP preferred SPONSOR: California African American Museum INFO: 84 March 23, 11:00 a.m. - 2:00 p.m. 213-744-7432, www.caamuseum.org
  • 83. MARCH EVENTS SACRED PR AISE CHOR ALE In conjunction with the exhibit Go Tell It on the Mountain, Dr. Diane White-Clayton, who leads Faithful Central Bible Church’s Sacred Praise Chorale, will take the audience on a musical journey of African songs, spirituals, hymns, and traditional gospel songs to illustrate the musical heritage of the African American church. WHEN: March 24, 2:00 p.m. SITE: California African American Museum 600 State Dr., Exposition Park, Los Angeles COST: Free SPONSOR: California African American Museum INFO: 213-744-7432, www.caamuseum.org BONES AND BLUES Bones and Blues is a monthly concert series featuring live blues and jazz music, domino tournaments, and a hearty barbecue dinner. WHEN: March 29, 8:00 p.m. SITE: The Center, 10950 S. Central Ave., Los Angeles COST: $25 Door, $15 Pre-sale SPONSOR: Watts Labor Community Action Committee (WLCAC) INFO: 323-563-5639, www.wlcac.org A WOMAN’S MONTH EVENT OF WISDOM, PR AC TICE , LIFEST YLE , AND CELEBR ATION Come to conclude the Month of the Woman by bringing together women from all walks of life to engage in reading poetry, prose, fable, story, and rhyme. This event will coincide with the KAOS Network’s month-end ArtWalk in Leimert Park. WHEN: March 31, 1:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m. SITE: Leimert Park, Los Angeles COST: Free SPONSOR: City of Los Angeles Department of Cultural Affairs, KAOS Network & The Product Company INFO: www.facebook.com/leimertparkartwalk 85
  • 84. 86
  • 85. Hale Woodruff, The Negro in California History – Settlement and Development, 1948, California African American Museum 87
  • 86. Valerie Ayres, Heritage, Photograph
  • 87. RECOMMENDED RE ADING CELEBR ATING AFRICAN AMERICAN HERITAGE In celebration of African American Heritage Month, we present the following reading selections for elementary, middle, and high school readers. Bibliography compiled by: Gabriel Cifarelli City of Los Angeles Department of Cultural Affairs MARTIN LUTHER KING, JR // EARLY READERS HAPPY BIRTHDAY, DR . K ING ! Written by Kathryn Jones Illustrated by Floyd Cooper Publisher: Simon & Schuster After getting in trouble at school for fighting with another boy because he wanted to sit in the back of the bus, fourth-grader Jamal gets in trouble again at home when his Grandpa Joe learns about the scuffle. Grandpa Joe explains the story of Rosa Parks and the Montgomery bus boycott to help Jamal understand the history associated with sitting in the back of the bus. Jamal is so impressed with the story that he leads his class in a skit about the historic incident, which they stage in celebration of Martin Luther King’s birthday. 89
  • 88. BIBLIOGR APHY / 2013 CELEBR ATING AFRICAN AMERICAN HERITAGE Toni Scott, South Africa: More Than Half a Man, Photograph, 2013 MY DR E AM OF MARTIN LUTHER K ING Written and illustrated by Faith Ringgold Publisher: Crown The author tells the story of Martin Luther King, Jr. from the perspective of her own childhood dream. As her dream opens, she sees a world of people carrying bags full of prejudice, hate, ignorance, violence, and fear, and exchanges them for bags of hope, freedom, peace, awareness, and love. Her dreams reflect real and imagined glimpses of the life of Martin Luther King, Jr. to tell the story of his vision and civil rights leadership. By visualizing the story as the author tells it, young readers will be able to understand Dr. King’s mission. MARTIN LUTHER KING, JR // MIDDLE READERS JUST LIK E MARTIN Written by Eleanora E. Tate Publisher: Just Us Young Stone is a member of his church’s youth group and a devoted follower of the nonviolent philosophies of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. When a racist’s bomb explodes in his Sunday school classroom, killing two of his friends, Stone demonstrates his commitment by organizing his peers for a controversial nonviolent children’s march. Stone must defy his father, who is much more militant, in this moving story set in the racially charged 1960s. MARTIN LUTHER K ING Written by Rosemary L. Bray Illustrated by Malcah Zeldis Publisher: William Morrow The life and works of Martin Luther King, Jr. are captured in over-sized pages of text and bright folk art in this exceptional book. The text begins by covering Martin’s early life, when his childhood experiences began to shape his sensibilities. The major events of Martin’s life are touched upon, including the day he became aware of and embraced Gandhi’s philosophy of nonviolent protest, and his marriage to Coretta Scott. Every significant civil rights event during Martin’s adult life is detailed, framing a young reader’s understanding of the era and of King’s leadership role. 90
  • 89. RECOMMENDED READING Toni Scott, South Africa: Child Look at Me, Photograph, 2013 MARTIN LUTHER KING, JR // HIGH SCHOOL READERS A TE STAMENT OF HOPE : THE E SSENTIAL WR ITINGS AND SPEECHE S OF MARTIN LUTHER K ING, JR . Written by Martin Luther King, Jr. Edited by James Melvin Washington Publisher: Harper San Francisco An exhaustive collection of the speeches, writings, and interviews with the Nobel Prize-winning activist, this book contains Martin Luther King, Jr.’s essential thoughts on nonviolence, social policy, integration, black nationalism, the ethics of love, hope, and more. CIVIL RIGHTS + SLAVERY // EARLY READERS A BAND OF ANGEL S : A STORY INSPIR ED BY THE JUBILEE SINGERS Written by Deborah Hopkinson Illustrated by Raúl Colón Publisher: Atheneum, Simon & Schuster This is the inspirational story of nine young people who in 1871 brought the Fisk School (later to become Fisk University) back from the brink of financial failure. Ella Sheppard, born into slavery in 1851, travels to Nashville after the emancipation to pursue her dream of attending Fisk. While there, she joins the choir. The group takes their show on the road, singing white songs to white audiences to try to earn money for the struggling school. Just when it seems that the school is going to fail, Ella decides to change the program leading her peers in rousing black spirituals from their slave heritage. The audiences are so moved by the soulful sounds that word spreads and the group, who become known as the Jubilee Singers, becomes an international sensation, saving the school from bankruptcy. 91
  • 90. BIBLIOGR APHY / 2013 CELEBR ATING AFRICAN AMERICAN HERITAGE Dolores Johnson, Floating, Watercolor, 16” x 10”, 2003 GR ANDDADDY’S GIF T Written by Margaree King Mitchell Illustrated by Larry Johnson Publisher: Bridge Water Little Joe lives through a life-changing experience when she witnesses her granddaddy’s stand against racial discrimination. Granddaddy is the first black to register to vote in their rural Mississippi town, and he and the family endure humiliation and threats from the townspeople as a result of his action. Little Joe’s love and respect for her granddaddy deepen as a result of the experience, but more importantly, Little Joe begins to appreciate the value of education and standing up for what is right. IF A BUS COULD TALK : THE STORY OF ROSA PAR KS Written and Illustrated by Faith Ringgold Publisher: Houghton Mifflin In an imaginative biographical story, young Marcie boards a bus and experiences an eerie event. The bus has no driver, but it is full of riders who are celebrating Rosa Park’s birthday. The riders tell Marcie the story of Rosa’s life from childhood through the events that followed her courageous refusal to give up her seat on this very same bus. Marcie’s enlightening bus ride climaxes when she actually meets Mrs. Parks, leaving her with a full understanding of why Rosa Parks is known as the mother of the civil rights movement. 92
  • 91. RECOMMENDED READING TO BE A DRUM Written by Evelyn Coleman Illustrated by Aminah Brenda Lynn Robinson Publisher: Albert Whitman Young Matt and Martha’s daddy tells them about their African ancestors who were so in tune with the earth that they captured its beat and translated it through their bodies onto their drums. When they were torn from their land and brought into slavery, their drums were taken away. But the people never lost their beat. Richly textured mixed-media paintings embellish the thought-provoking message. CIVIL RIGHTS + SLAVERY // MIDDLE READERS THE CAP TIVE Written by Joyce Hansen Publisher: Scholastic Kofi, a West African prince, is betrayed by a fellow countryman and stolen away from his family, friends, and Sierra Leone homeland by a slave trader in 1788. Young readers travel with him from the time of his terrifying bondage and voyage over the Atlantic in a slave ship to his landing in America, where he is sold. Lucky & Lenny Conner, Eye Dream in Colorz, Canvas, 20” x 24” 93
  • 92. BIBLIOGR APHY / 2013 CELEBR ATING AFRICAN AMERICAN HERITAGE Marcella Swett, Dream, Acrylic on wood panel, 48” x 48”, 2008 LIF T EVERY VOICE AND SING Written by James Weldon Johnson Illustrated by Elizabeth Catlett Publisher: Walker Books for Young Readers Written by civil rights leader and poet James Weldon Johnson in 1899, “Lift Ev’ry Voice and Sing” is sung in schools and churches throughout America. The popular, timeless song is recognized as a testimonial to the struggle and achievements of African American people - past, present, and future. MANY THOUSANDS GONE : AFR ICAN AMER ICANS FROM SL AVERY TO FR EEDOM Written by Virginia Hamilton Illustrated by Leo and Diane Dillon Publisher: Knopf, Random House Thirty-four brief, true stories about slavery are powerfully told. Each story relates a small piece of the historical truth about slavery. This book would make a fine classroom text or can be shared with your child to raise his or her awareness of what has gone before. 94
  • 93. Bryan Tilford, “A Real Buffalo Soldier” What is Soul? Series, Newspaper, pastel and acrylic on canvas board, 20” x 24”, 2012
  • 94. BIBLIOGR APHY / 2013 CELEBR ATING AFRICAN AMERICAN HERITAGE Buena, Rosa Parks - Enduring Courage, Pencil, 27” x 31”, 2010 NE X T STOP FR EEDOM : THE STORY OF A SL AVE GIR L Written by Dorothy and Thomas Hoobler and Carey-Greenberg Associates Illustrated by Cheryl Hanna Publisher: Silver Burdett, Simon & Schuster Young Emily, a slave, dreams of freedom as she learns to read and write. Emily has heard about the Moses who led slaves to freedom. One night, Moses does come to escort her and others to freedom on the Underground Railroad. After a long and suspenseful trip, with slave catchers on their heels, the group is hidden by a Quaker family and then sent on to freedom in Pennsylvania. OH, FR EEDOM ! : K IDS TALK ABOUT THE CIVIL R IGHTS MOVEMENT WITH THE PEOPLE WHO MADE IT HAPPEN Written by Casey King and Linda Barrett Osborne Illustrated by Joe Brooks Publisher: Knopf, Random House Kids conduct thirty-one interviews with adult friends, family members, and civil rights activists to learn firsthand about the days of the 1960s civil rights movement. Informative chapters thoroughly explore the Jim Crow era, non-violence, black power, and segregation. Three essays, and an important foreword by Rosa Parks, provide background information on various aspects of the era to help add perspective to the interviews. THE YE AR THE Y WALK ED : ROSA PAR KS AND THE MONTGOMERY BUS BOYCOT T Written by Beatrice Siegel Publisher: Four Winds, Simon & Schuster Rosa Parks’ heroic act of nonviolent resistance, when she refused to give up her seat to a white rider on a bus, sparked the most widely watched civil rights demonstration in the history of the United States. A highly accessible, non-fiction account of the Montgomery bus boycott, this book describes in complete detail the call from black civic leaders to the African American community to unite for the boycott, and the strategies that the community used to hold their position for over a year, until they prevailed. 96
  • 95. RECOMMENDED READING CIVIL RIGHTS + SLAVERY // HIGH SCHOOL READERS THE BONDWOMAN’S NAR R ATIVE Written by Hannah Crafts; Edited by Henry Louis Gates, Jr. Publisher: Warner Books This novel was discovered some years ago, by distinguished Harvard professor Henry Louis Gates, Jr. in an auction catalog. Gates realized that the novel, if genuine, would be the first novel known to have been written by a black woman in America, as well as the only one by a fugitive slave. He bought the manuscript (there was no competing bid) and began the exhilarating task of confirming the racial identity of the author and the approximate date of composition (circa 1855-59). Gates describes this detective work in the introduction to The Bondwoman’s Narrative. He also proposes a couple of candidates for authorship, assuming that Hannah Crafts was the real or assumed name of the author, and not solely a pen name. If Gates is right (his introduction and appendix should convince just about everyone), The Bondwoman’s Narrative is a tremendous discovery, and is well worth reading on literary and historical grounds. As Gates argues, these pages provide our first “unedited, unaffected, unglossed, unaided” glimpse into the mind of a fugitive slave. Caron Bowman, Entry of the Soul 97
  • 96. BIBLIOGR APHY / 2013 CELEBR ATING AFRICAN AMERICAN HERITAGE Benita Elliot, We Never Said Goodbye and We Haven’t Said We’d Try, Photo illustration and photography, 10” x 6”, 2013 INVISIBLE MAN Written by Ralph Ellison Publisher: Random House Invisible Man is a nightmarish novel of a man trying to comprehend the confusion of myth, experience, and inner reactions that control his life. The nameless narrator describes growing up in a black community in the South, attending a Negro college from which he is expelled, moving to New York and becoming the chief spokesman of the Harlem branch of “the Brotherhood,” and retreating amid violence and confusion to the basement lair of the Invisible Man he imagines himself. NAR R ATIVE OF THE LIFE OF FR EDER ICK DOUGL ASS, AN AMER ICAN SL AVE : WR IT TEN BY HIMSELF Written by Frederick Douglass Publisher: Yale University Press Frederick Douglass was born a slave on a Maryland plantation, but learned to read. Mistreated because he knew too much, he finally escaped from slavery and gained fame as an orator. Published in 1845, just seven years after his escape from slavery, this book provides students with an accessible introduction to the work of Frederick Douglass, as well a vivid first-hand account of life as a slave. Students interested in pursuing the subject are encouraged to read his later autobiography, The Life and Times of Frederick Douglass, published in 1881. 98
  • 97. Dee Thomas, Teach and Learn Together, Pencil and pen, 2013 99
  • 98. BIBLIOGR APHY / 2013 CELEBR ATING AFRICAN AMERICAN HERITAGE NATIVE SON Written by Richard Wright Publisher: Harper Perennial Native Son deals with the problems an African American has attaining manhood in a society that conspires against him. The story begins by showing the difficulty of achieving normal human relations in the squalor of a Chicago slum. Bigger Thomas has what appears to be amazing luck when he gets a job as a chauffeur with a wealthy family. However, in fear and confusion, he accidentally kills the daughter. He tries to escape, but is caught and tried for murder. The events seem to be a long nightmare over which Bigger himself has little or no control. UP FROM SL AVERY Written by Booker T. Washington Publisher: Doubleday Born in 1856, this autobiography describes Washington’s struggles, after the emancipation, to gain an education and found Tuskegee Institute. This addition also includes selections from other slave narratives. LIFE + CULTURE // EARLY READERS THE BAT BOY AND HIS VIOLIN Written by Gavin Curtis Illustrated by E. B. Lewis Publisher: Simon and Schuster Young Reginald is a consummate musician who would rather play his violin than do anything else, much to his father’s chagrin. His father, who manages the Dukes, a losing team in the Negro National Baseball League, decides to recruit Reginald as a bat boy for the team. Reginald is a disaster as a bat boy, but the team finds his violin music inspirational. As Reginald plays the music of Mozart, Beethoven, and Bach in the dugout during the games, the team begins to perform to new heights. Finally, the Dukes are in the position to win a pennant against the hottest team in the league. Win or lose, Reginald has made a difference, earning the respect of the team and the gratitude of his father. E XPLOR E BL ACK HISTORY WITH WEE PAL S Written and Illustrated by Morrie Turner Publisher: Just Us The Wee Pals, comic-strip characters who first appeared in Ebony and Black World magazines in 1964, are the vehicle for delivering a dose of African American history to young readers. The accomplishments of over seventy prominent African Americans from all walks of life, including Angela Davis, Jesse Jackson, Thurgood Marshall, and James Farmer, are discussed by the Wee Pals in a series of short comic strips. The format and brevity of each vignette are sure to attract young readers. 100
  • 99. RECOMMENDED READING Kevin Tidmore, Sunset, Photograph, 31” x 18”, 2009 I LOVE MY HAIR ! Written by Natashia Anastasia Tarpley Illustrated by E. B. Lewis Publisher: Little, Brown Young Keyana is totally satisfied with her head of thick, soft hair. Even as she endures the sometimes painful combing and brushing process, she understands that her hair is special. It can be woven, braided, or beaded into beautiful styles that she loves, which fills her with pride. R E AD FOR ME , MAMA Written by Vashanti Rahaman Illustrated by Lori McElrath-Eslick Publisher: Boyds Mills This sensitive story about a hard-working single mother and her loving son will touch young readers. Joseph loves to read and checks two books out of the library – one that can read by himself and another, more difficult one for his Mama to read to him. But every day Mama has a reason to avoid reading. On Mondays there was grocery shopping to do; on Tuesday, housecleaning; on Wednesday... 101
  • 100. BIBLIOGR APHY / 2013 CELEBR ATING AFRICAN AMERICAN HERITAGE Dolores Johnson, Woman in Red, Watercolor, 5” x 7”, 2003 102
  • 101. RECOMMENDED READING Janet E. Dandridge, Bird of Paradise in Motion, Photograph SOMETHING BE AUTIFUL Written by Sharon Dennis Wyeth Illustrated by Chris K. Soentpiet Publisher: Doubleday A young girl searches for something beautiful in her inner-city neighborhood, surrounded by graffiti, homelessness, broken glass, and trash. Through her neighbors she begins to recognize the small things in life that are beautiful such as good meals, friends, a small neighborhood garden, and the special love of her mother. Her mother has no trouble seeing the beauty in her own child, whose beaming face is seen on the book’s cover. SOMEWHER E IN AFR ICA Written by Ingrid Mennen and Niki Daly Illustrated by Nicolaas Maritz Publisher: Puffin Unicorn, Puffin A young boy named Ashraf lives in Africa, but not the Africa that might come to mind when young readers think about that continent. Ashraf’s home is a big city teeming with skyscrapers, bustling with cars, and alive with the energy of any large metropolitan area. Ashraf’s only view of the wilder side of Africa comes from books, whose pictures of lions, zebras, and crocodiles fascinate him. A young reader’s vision of Africa will broaden with the new knowledge that Africa has more than jungles and wild animals. 103
  • 102. BIBLIOGR APHY / 2013 CELEBR ATING AFRICAN AMERICAN HERITAGE LIFE + CULTURE // MIDDLE READERS COMING TOGETHER : CELEBR ATIONS FOR AFR ICAN AMER ICAN FAMILIE S Written by Harriette Cole Illustrated by John Pinderhughes Publisher: Jump At The Sun African American families are dynamic and powerful. Celebrations play an important part in the fabric of the family. Coming Together is devoted to several of the very special occasions that many African American families honor. Filled with creative ideas for involving the entire family – from young children to grandparents and great-grandparents – this rich book provides everything you need to transform time together into compelling and memorable occasions. Coming Together is brimming with sample menus, easy-to-follow recipes, crafts, activities, and unique ideas to bring the value of these celebrations to life. THE EDUCATION OF MARY: A LIT TLE MISS OF COLOR , 1832 Written by Ann Rinaldi Publisher: Jump At The Sun In 1832, Prudence Crandall, a Quaker educator in Connecticut, closed her Canterbury Female Seminary and reopened it as a school for young black women. This novel revolves around the formation of that school and the storm of controversy it created in town. Many historical forces come into play here: the abolitionist movement, endemic prejudice against free blacks, and the brutality of the early factory system. HER STOR IE S : AFR ICAN AMER ICAN FOLK TALE S, FAIRY TALE S, AND TRUE TALE S Written by Virginia Hamilton Illustrated by Leo and Diane Dillon Publisher: Scholastic Nineteen stories are expertly told about black female folk and fairy characters. This enticing work is dedicated to mothers, grandmothers, and aunts, who have often been the bearers of such stories from generation to generation. Each story is exquisitely illustrated and is punctuated with a short commentary that adds insight into the nature and origin of the tale. Mature children, especially your daughters, will love this immediate classic. (Nonstandard English) THE MIDDLE OF SOMEWHER E : A STORY OF SOUTH AFR ICA Written By Shiela Gordon Publisher: Orchard, Grolier Young Rebecca, who lives in a black township in South Africa, is afraid of being forced out of her home. The government wants to relocate her family and neighbors to a less developed area in order to accommodate expansion for white suburbanites. The villagers protest the attempts to move them, and Rebecca’s father is arrested after a communitywide demonstration. The evils of apartheid come through strongly in this novel of a family’s determination to stay together. 104
  • 103. RECOMMENDED READING Karien Zachery, Buffalo Soldier, Mixed media R EFLEC TIONS OF A BL ACK COWBOY: THE BUFFALO SOLDIERS Written by Robert Miller Illustrated by Richard Leonard Publisher: Silver Burdett, Simon & Schuster The stories of the African American Buffalo Soldiers, who served in the Ninth and Tenth Cavalries in the nineteenth century, are colorfully told in this entertaining book narrated by Old Cowboy. The Buffalo Soldiers played an important role in opening up the western frontier, yet their stories are not well known. In this book of five short stories, several of these brave soldiers are acknowledged for their historic achievements and battles. The Reflections of a Black Cowboy series also includes a volume on pioneers, as well as one on cowboys and one on mountain men. 105
  • 104. BIBLIOGR APHY / 2013 CELEBR ATING AFRICAN AMERICAN HERITAGE Janet E. Dandridge, Untitled, Photograph STORY TELLER’S BE ADS Written by Jane Kurts Publisher: Gulliver, Harcourt Brace Two girls, Sahay and Rachel, are bonded together during their brave journey from their Ethiopian homeland to the Sudan, where they hope to find peace and food. The story takes place during the Ethiopian famine of the 1980s, a time when millions were dying of starvation and internal warfare. The two girls – one Jewish, one Christian – ultimately find that they have more in common than not, once they overlook their different ethnic upbringings and customs, superstitions, and traditions of two distinctly different Ethiopian groups. This book will appeal to young readers of historical fiction. LIFE + CULTURE // HIGH SCHOOL READERS THE COLOR PUR PLE Written by Alice Walker Publisher: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich Celie is a poor black woman whose letters tell the story of 20 years of her life, beginning at age 14 when she is being abused and raped by her father and attempting to protect her sister from the same fate, and continuing over the course of her marriage to “Mister,” a brutal man who terrorizes her. Celie eventually learns that her abusive husband has been keeping her sister’s letters from her and the rage she feels, combined with an example of love and independence provided by her close friend Shug, pushes her finally toward an awakening of her creative and loving self. 106
  • 105. RECOMMENDED READING THE IR E YE S WER E WATCHING GOD Written by Zora Neale Hurston Publisher: University of Illinois Press Fair and long-legged, independent and articulate, Janie Crawford sets out to be her own person – no mean feat for a black woman in the ‘30s. Janie’s quest for identity takes her through three marriages and into a journey back to her roots. SONG OF SOLOMON Written by Toni Morrison Publisher: Knopf Song of Solomon explores the quest for cultural identity through an African American folktale about enslaved Africans who escape slavery by fleeing back to Africa. The novel tells the story of Macon “Milkman” Dead, a young man alienated from himself and estranged from his family, his community, and his historical and cultural roots. Author Toni Morrison, long renowned for her detailed imagery, visual language, and “righting” of black history, guides the protagonist along a 30-year journey that enables him to reconnect with his past and realize his self-worth. YELLOW BACK R ADIO BROK E-DOWN Written by Ishmael Reed Publisher: Avon Ishmael Reed has put together a collage of American pop culture, ancient Egyptian mythology, and voodoo ideals which becomes, in the reader’s mind, either an incomprehensible mess or hilarious satire. Yellow Back Radio Broke-Down is a novel about a black, voodoo cowboy, Loop Garoo, and his exciting adventures. It is a satire on the Western, and the American values that made the Western popular. SOURCES: Amazon.com, www.amazon.com Bloom, Harold, Ed. Major Black American Writers Through the Harlem Renaissance. New York: Chelsea House, 1995 Bloom, Harold, Ed. Major Modern Black American Writers. New York: Chelsea House, 1995 Rand, Donna and Toni Trent Parker, and Sheila Foster, Eds. Black Books Galore! Guide to Great African American Children’s Books. New York: John Wiley and Sons Inc, 1998 Rand, Donna and Trent Parker. Black Books Galore! More Great African American Children’s Books. New York: John Wiley and Sons Inc, 2001 Stanford, Barbara Dodds and Karima Amin, Eds. Illinois: National Council of Teachers of English, 1978 107
  • 106. Shanequa Gay, Release, Oil and acrylic on wood, 24” x 24”
  • 107. CIT Y OF LOS ANGELES / 2013 AFRICAN AMERICAN HERITAGE MONTH CELEBR ATION DISNEY SPOTLIGHT BIBLIOGR APHY CELEBR ATING AFRICAN AMERICAN HERITAGE HOME IS WITH OUR FAMILY Written by Joyce Hansem Illustrated by E.B. Lewis Published by Jump at the Sun Maria Peterson is looking forward to turning thirteen. She envisions new adult prestige and responsibility, like attending abolitionist meetings and listening to inspiring speakers like Sojourner Truth. She doesn’t bank on all the unexpected changes that her thirteenth year bings, however. For starters the City of New York wants to turn her “neat little settlement” into a magnificent park. Now that Maria has made a new friend, she’s even more determined to stay. But soon Maria discovers that her friend may have issues even more dire than being thrown out of her home. Will Maria be able to save her home and help her friend? Or will she just rue the day her thirteenth year began? MARTIN’S BIG WOR DS : THE LIFE OF DR . MARTIN LUTHER K ING, JR . Written by Doreen Rappaport Illustrated by Bryan Collier Published by Jump At The Sun Compiling quotations from the life of Martin Luther King, Jr., Doreen Rappaport and Bryan Collier present the proverbs that shaped the great Civil Rights leader. Portraying King both as a young and a grown man, Martin’s Big Words inspires young readers of all ages to accept everyone, dream, and change the world. Includes a chronology and bibliography for further study. 109
  • 108. CELEBR ATING AFRICAN AMERICAN HERITAGE Kraig Blue, Sisters Dawn, Day and Twilight, Oil on canvas, 6’ x 5’, 2001 MOSE S : WHEN HAR R IET TUBMAN LED HER PEOPLE TO FR EEDOM Written by Carole Boston Weatherford Illustrated by Kadir Nelson Published by Jump at the Sun In lyrical text, Carole Boston Weather ford describes Tubman’s spiritual journey as she hears the voice of God guiding her North to freedom on that very first trip to escape the brutal practice of forced servitude. This is a unique and moving portrait of one of the most inspiring figures of the Underground Railroad. Kadir Nelson’s emotionally charged paintings embody strength, healing and hope. 110
  • 109. DISNEY SPOTLIGHT BIBLIOGR APHY Toni Scott, South Africa: Running Free, Photograph, 2013 SOJOUR NER TRUTH’S STEP-STOMP STR IDE Written by Andrea Davis Pinkney Illustrated by David Pinkney Published by Hyperion Books for Children She was big. She was black. She was so beautiful. Born into slavery, Belle had to endure the cruelty of several masters before she escaped to freedom. And oh, was freedom sweet! But still, she knew that she wouldn’t really be free unless she was helping to end slavery and injustice in America. That’s when she changed her name to Sojourner and began traveling across the country, demanding equal rights for black people and for women. A woman of towering height and a mesmerizing speaker, Sojourner began drawing mighty crowds wherever she went. Many people weren’t ready for her message--some even threatened her. But Sojourner was brave and her truth was powerful, and people would remember what she said. And slowly, but surely as Sojourner’s step-stomp stride, America began to change. SUGAR PLUM BALLER INAS : PLUM FANTASTIC Written by Whoopi Goldberg Illustrated by Maryn Roos Published by Hyperion Books for Children Alexandrea Petrakova Johnson does not want to be a beautiful ballerina, and she does not want to leave her friends in Apple Creek. Unfortunately, that doesn’t stop her ballet-crazy mother from moving them to Harlem, or from enrolling Al at the Nutcracker School of Ballet. Life is hard when you’re the new ballerina on the block, and it’s even harder when you’re chosen to be the Sugar Plum Fairy in the school recital! Not only is Al a terrible dancer, but she’s also got a rotten case of stage fright! Al’s ballet classmates are going to have to use all the plum power they’ve got to coach this scary fairy! 111
  • 110. CELEBR ATING AFRICAN AMERICAN HERITAGE Tatiana El Khouri, Hot Steppers, Painting, 2013 HAND IN HAND : TEN BL ACK MEN WHO CHANGED AMER ICA Written by Andrea Pinkney Illustrated by Brian Pinkney Hand in Hand presents the stories of ten men from different eras in American history, organized chronologically to provide a scope from slavery to the modern day. The stories are accessible, fully-drawn narratives offering the subjects’ childhood influences, the time and place in which they lived, their accomplishments and motivations, and the legacies they left for future generations as links in the “freedom chain.” This book will be the definitive family volume on the subject, punctuated with dynamic full color portraits and spot illustrations by two-time Caldecott Honor winner and multiple Coretta Scott King Book Award recipient, Brian Pinkney. Backmatter includes a civil rights timeline, sources, and further reading. Profiled: Benjamin Banneker, Frederick Douglass, Booker T. Washington, W.E.B. DuBois, A. Philip Randolph, Thurgood Marshall, Jackie Robinson, Malcolm X, Martin Luther King, Jr., and Barack H. Obama II. 112
  • 111. DISNEY SPOTLIGHT BIBLIOGR APHY WE AR E THE SHIP: THE STORY OF NEGRO LE AGUE BASEBALL Written by Kadir Nelson Illustrated by Kadir Nelson Published by Jump at the Sun ”We are the ship; all else the sea.” — Rube Foster, founder of the Negro National League. The story of Negro League baseball is the story of gifted athletes and determined owners; of racial discrimination and international sportsmanship; of fortunes won and lost; of triumphs and defeats on and off the field. It is a perfect mirror for the social and political history of black America in the first half of the twentieth century. But most of all, the story of the Negro Leagues is about hundreds of unsung heroes who overcame segregation, hatred, terrible conditions, and low pay to do the one thing they loved more than anything else in the world: play ball. Dee Thomas, I Thought of Traveling Too, Acrylic, 2013 113
  • 112. CELEBR ATING AFRICAN AMERICAN HERITAGE Buena, How Eye Wonder, Pencil, 37” x 31”, 2012 YOU DON’ T EVEN K NOW ME Written by Sharon G. Flake Published by Hyperion Books for Children In 9 stories and 13 poems, Sharon G. Flake gives readers insight into the minds of a diverse group of adolescent African American males. There’s Tow-Kaye, getting married at age 17 to the love of his life, who’s pregnant. He knows it’s the right thing to do, but he’s scared to death. James writes in his diary about his twin brother’s terrible secret, which threatens to pull James down, too. Tyler explains what it’s like to be a player with the ladies. In a letter to his uncle, La’Ron confesses that he’s infected with HIV> Eric takes us on a tour of North Philly on the Fourth of July, when the heat could make a guy go crazy. Still, he loves his hood. These and other unforgettable characters come to life in this poignant, funny, and often searing collection of urban male voices. At right: Carole J. McCoy, 4>Word SEEing, Acrylic, glass, resin beads, and melted vinyl on canvas, 28” x 32”, 2012 114
  • 113. 115
  • 114. Lili Bernard, Carnaval en la Trocha, Oil on canvas, 72” x 60”, 2009
  • 115. Toni Scott, South Africa: Robben Island, Photograph, 2012
  • 116. CIT Y OF LOS ANGELES / 2013 AFRICAN AMERICAN HERITAGE MONTH CELEBR ATION The Department of Cultural Affairs is pleased to present the works of several fine writers in the 2013 African American Heritage Month Calendar and Cultural Guide. We are honored to showcase the work of Los Angeles poets Amoke, Valena Broussard Dismukes, Cherise “Reese” Charleswell, Linda La Rose, David Payne, S. Pearl Sharp, and C. Jerome Woods. 119
  • 117. by Valena Broussard Dismukes If women ruled the world. Everything would be tied with bows: The forests, the flowers, the fauna. If women ruled the world, Everything would be pink and bedazzled: The guns, the tanks, the bombers. If women ruled the world, Everything would be fresh and clean: The rivers, the oceans, the skies. If women ruled the world. Everything would be in harmony: Our families, our businesses, our leaders. If women ruled the world, Every child would be taken care of: Well-fed, well-dressed, well-taught. I want that world now! Bryan Tilford, Ohio Soul, Acrylic on canvas board, 20” x 24”, 2012 120
  • 118. 121
  • 119. by Amoke Slip out of that straightjacket that is known as Normalcy... Created in God’s image... All! You are you and I am me... Dance to your own Rhythm... March to your own beat... Dare to make a Difference... Make this universe complete... Resolve to rise to the challenge... It’s time to answer God’s call... To the frontline everybody... Live your truth... Stand tall... Remember... You’re made in God’s image... So be the best you... You can be... Part of a vast... Diverse creation A separate reality! 122 C. Jerome Woods, Untitled, Photograph
  • 120. by S. Pearl Sharp sometimes I stand over the kitchen sink and float in the mistakes I’ve made lean on the vacuum sucking someone into forgetfulness to purge my file Men should do more housework It’s good for cleaning the memory of the soul 123
  • 121. by Lynda La Rose as she wrote she saw glimmer of light photosynthesis redefined colors refracted in rainbow hues she saw atoms spinning forever making things matter the cellular truth in constant division and refinement she saw the intangible beyond the concrete the strong mortar holding thought to thought a foundation impenetrable to termite lies she wrote beyond the subjects and predicates of her days conjunctions keeping her intact tenses present and kicking inside waiting to be born she saw the devil and laughed in its face she saw the real behind the smoke and felt her way through the maze she saw pain beneath her placid smile and acknowledged it as her own she saw the love of her life and recognized her own face and as she wrote she saw the god in herself she saw the god in herself she saw the god in HERSELF Verlena Johnson, Self Portrait with Dashiki, Mixed media, 2012 125
  • 122. by Cherise “Reese” Charleswell My hair does not grow downward It does not opt to proceed in a linear formation from root-to-tip, without manipulation it grows upward & outward Yes indeed, it reaches for the sun & grabs the attention of passer-bys ----- who are intrigued by it cotton-like curls kinky ringlets tantalizing twists curvaceous coils All unwilling to be ignored defiantly they revolt unprocessed they will not RELAX. Within these tendrils my history is stored, and they refuse to be easily divided and moved about, constantly growing & forever expanding they match my beliefs and thought process © 126 2011 Cherise “Reese” Charleswell
  • 123. by David Payne So very small. Your father so tall. So you need not fear, for he standing near. Life is a cradle, wonderful life. Wild and willing to face unknown strife. Reach out of your cradle, out of your rest. Reach out for life streams in mother’s breast... Reach for the sky. Grow strong and beautiful with the wind. Then let the wind... It knows what is right. Wrap you up in the warm sunlight and let the windy nurse kiss you in the light. Teaching you to kneel before the Lords calls. Let the rain wash you and soon you will see how tall that you grow from a seed to a tree. 127
  • 124. by C. Jerome Woods Just when dusk dances into dawn I delve, I dream, I detach Where sun rays blink and brilliance is born I try to will you here I look for you Even conjure you back In the quiet of calm Surreptitiously I straddle lucidity and the unknown California palm Struggle with family, isolation, infinity In the presence of mind and morning dew I look for you Second-mother I look for you Crying and driving Playing charades when laughing Somewhere between here and there Crippled and incapacitated while walking I remember the beauty of you hair Rendered to sleep talking Olfactory awakening I look for you Your delectable fare I look for you Dearest grandmother, bridge to eternity I want you here with me I walk to the cadence of your smile In Mind crevices and sweet song Pass by closets containing your couture and style In faces of babies I sleep in the bed and shake my head In angel visits and humming birds Open eyed tears run red I look for you You are not here; grandmother you are dead When I have done my best I look for you Sunrise to sunset In deeds and words God’s willing Skeletal caricature in pain I will join you at rest Broken I look for you Bits and pieces Like Southern Missionary Baptist Church Like sanctuary glass windows stain I look for you 128
  • 125. Violet Y. Fields, Side View, California African American Museum, Gift of Violet Fields in memory of Mark Christopher James
  • 126. CIT Y OF LOS ANGELES / 2013 AFRICAN AMERICAN HERITAGE MONTH CELEBR ATION DEPARTMENT OF CULTUR AL AFFAIRS 201 North Figueroa Street, Suite 1400 Los Angeles, California 90012 TEL 213.202.5500 FAX 213.202.5517 WEB culturela.org ABOUT THE CITY OF LOS ANGELES DEPARTMENT OF CULTURAL AFFAIRS (DCA) The Department of Cultural Affairs (DCA) generates and supports high quality arts and cultural experiences for Los Angeles’ 4 million residents and 26 million annual visitors. DCA advances the social and economic impact of the arts and ensures access to diverse and enriching cultural activities through: grant making, marketing, public art, community arts programming, arts education, and building partnerships with artists and arts and cultural organizations in neighborhoods throughout the City of Los Angeles. DCA’s operating budget and managed portfolio totaled $38.2 million in fiscal year 2010/11. It consisted of: $9.5 million in funds from the Public Works Improvements Arts Program (PWIAP); $8.9 million in City related and indirect cost allocations; $8.7 million from the Private Arts Development Fee Program (ADF); $7.7 million in Transient Occupancy Tax funds; and over $3.4 million in private and public funds raised from foundation, corporate, government, and individual donors. DCA significantly supports artists and cultural projects through its Public Art Division by administering a portfolio totaling $18.2 million in PWIAP and ADF funds in FY10/11. DCA’s Marketing and Development Division has raised over $19 million since FY07/08 to re-grant to LA-based artists and arts and cultural organizations for special grant initiatives and to support DCA’s special programming and facilities. DCA also grants approximately $2.2 million annually to over 280 artists and nonprofit arts and cultural organizations through its longestablished Grants Administration Division. DCA provides arts and cultural programming through its Community Arts Division, managing numerous neighborhood arts and cultural centers, theaters, historic sites, and educational initiatives. DCA’s Marketing and Development Division also markets the City’s arts and cultural events through development and collaboration with strategic partners, design and production of creative catalogs, publications, and promotional materials, and management of the culturela.org website visited by over 3 million people annually. 130
  • 127. NEIGHBORHOOD ARTS AND CULTUR AL CENTERS CIT Y OF LOS ANGELES DEPARTMENT OF CULTUR AL AFFAIRS ART IN THE PARK 5568 Via Marisol Los Angeles, CA 90042 323.259.0861 MADRID THEATRE 21622 Sherman Way Canoga Park, CA 91303 818.347.9419 BANNING’S LANDING COMMUNIT Y CENTER 100 East Water Street Wilmington, CA 90748 310.522.2015 MCGROART Y ARTS CENTER 7570 McGroarty Terrace Tujunga, CA 91042 818.352.5285 BARNSDALL PARK 4800 Hollywood Boulevard Los Angeles, CA 90027 NATE HOLDEN PERFORMING ARTS CENTER 4718 West Washington Boulevard Los Angeles, CA 90016 323.964.9768 BARNSDALL ARTS CENTER 323.644.6295 GALLERY THEATRE 323.644.6272 HOLLYHOCK HOUSE 323.644.6269 JUNIOR ARTS CENTER 323.644.6275 LOS ANGELES MUNICIPAL ART GALLERY 323.644.6269 CALIFORNIA TR ADITIONAL MUSIC SOCIET Y 16953 Ventura Boulevard Encino, CA 91316 818.817.7756 CANOGA PARK YOUTH ARTS CENTER 7222 Remmet Avenue Canoga Park, CA 91303 818.346.7099 CENTER FOR THE ARTS, EAGLE ROCK 2225 Colorado Boulevard Los Angeles, CA 90041 323.226.1617 CR AFT AND FOLK ART MUSEUM 5814 Wilshire Boulevard Los Angeles, CA 90036 323.937.4230 CROATIAN CULTUR AL CENTER OF GREATER LOS ANGELES 510 West 7th Street San Pedro, CA 90731 310.548.7630 LANKERSHIM ARTS CENTER 5108 Lankershim Boulevard North Hollywood, CA 91602 818.752.7568 PERFORMING ARTS FIREHOUSE 438 North Mesa Street San Pedro, CA 90731 310.548.2496 SUN VALLEY YOUTH ARTS CENTER 8642 Sunland Boulevard Sun Valley, CA 91352 213.202.5528 VISION THEATRE (Closed for Renovations) 3341 West 43rd Place Los Angeles, CA 90008 323.290.4843 WARNER GR AND THEATRE 478 West 6th Street San Pedro, CA 90731 310.548.2493 WATTS TOWERS ARTS CENTER 1727 East 107th Street Los Angeles, CA 90002 213.847.4646 WILLIAM GR ANT STILL ARTS CENTER 2520 South West View Street Los Angeles, CA 90016 213.847.1540 WILLIAM REAGH LOS ANGELES PHOTOGR APHY CENTER 2332 West Fourth Street Los Angeles, CA 90057 213.382.8133 131
  • 128. CIT Y OF LOS ANGELES / 2013 AFRICAN AMERICAN HERITAGE MONTH CELEBR ATION DEPARTMENT OF CULTUR AL AFFAIRS CALENDAR AND CULTUR AL GUIDE ARTISTS The City of Los Angeles Department of Cultural Affairs gives special thanks to our calendar artists for generously allowing us to use their work in this publication. Amoke S. Pearl Sharp befotografik.photoshelter.com spearlsharp.com Andre Ajibade George Evans Marcella Swett ajibadedesigns.blogspot.com g.evans68@yahoo.com maddiebeane@yahoo.com Valerie Ayres Edward Ewell Dee Thomas words2@aol.com edphoto34@sbcglobal.net manyartsarts@gmail.com Joseph Beckles Kohshin Finley Kevin Tidmore spidergal.johan@gmail.com kohshfinley.com Kev_image@yahoo.com Donald Bernard Shanequa Gay Brian L. Tilford donald.bernard3@verizon.net www.sgcreativewisdom.com Tilfordartgroup.com Lili Bernard Bernard Hoyes Sharon J. Williams lilibernard.com bernardhoyes.com jsharonart@yahoo.com Kraig Blue Ronald Jackson C. Jerome Woods kraigblue.artweb.com eucpimagine.com wooro@juno.com Caron Bowman Dolores Johnson Karien Zachery karonbowman.webs.com Dolojo2@yahoo.com theartnme.com Yrneh Brown Verlena Johnson yrnehgabonbrown.com verlenasroom@yahoo.com Justin Bua Linda La Rose justinbua.com Lyndarosela@aol.com Courtesy of The California African American Museum Buena L. Marietta buenavisionart.com Marietta_del_mar@yahoo.com Cherise “Reese” Charleswell Carole McCoy etsy.com/EclecticLivingOnEtsy cjthefineartist@gmail.com Lucky & Lenny Conner Michael Massenburg luckyvirgophotography.com michaelmassenburg.com Janet Dandridge Duane Paul janetdandridge.com duanepaul.com Charles Dickson David Payne blackartinamerica.net blkonblk4u@aol.com Valena Broussard Dismukes Greg Pitts vdismukes@gmail.com greggpitts@yahoo.com Chanel Eddines Miles Regis chanizi001@yahoo.com milesregis.com Tatiana El-Khouri Toni Scott tatiana.elkhouri@gmail.com 132 Benita Elliott free2express@aol.com toniscott@earthlink.net 600 State Drive Los Angeles, CA 90037 213.744.7432 caamuseum.org Charles Alston Romare Bearden Phoebe Beasly Elizabeth Catlett Jacques EnguerrandGourgue Violet Y. Fields Herbert Gentry Harvey Johnson John Thomas Riddle Jr. Matthew Thomas Walter Henry Williams Hale Woodruff At right: Kevin Tidmore, Eclipse, Photograph, 40” x 17”, 2012
  • 129. 133
  • 130. Toni Scott, African Beauty Ugandan Woman – Kiara Kabukuru, Photograph, 2004
  • 131. CIT Y OF LOS ANGELES / 2013 AFRICAN AMERICAN HERITAGE MONTH CELEBR ATION The City of Los Angeles gratefully appreciates the generous contributions of our major sponsors for the 2013 African American Heritage Month Celebration. 201 North Figueroa Street, Suite 1400 Los Angeles, California 90012 TEL 213.202.5500 FAX 213.202.5517 WEB culturela.org 135
  • 132. African Americans At The Crossroads of Freedom & Equality is proud to be a sponsor of the City of Los Angeles Department of Cultural Affairs AFRICAN AMERICAN AFRICAN AMERICAN CAN CA A CAN CA A HERITAGE MONTH HERITAGE MONTH TA AG
  • 133. Someone speaks. Someone hears. A conversation begins. And the course of a life, or a people, or a nation, is forever changed. Abraham Lincoln spoke. People heard. And the conversation turned to freedom. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. spoke. America heard. The conversation turned to equality, and continues on to this day.  Wells Fargo celebrates 150 years of African American history, heritage, and progress. Wells Fargo is proud to commemorate the 150th anniversary of the Emancipation Proclamation, and the 50th anniversary of Dr. King’s “I Have a Dream” speech. To celebrate, we are honored to present the Kinsey Collection — a national touring exhibit of art and history where you can immerse yourself in the rich heritage of African American culture. See it in San Francisco, California, from February through May 2013; in Charlotte, North Carolina, from June through September 2013; and in Baltimore, Maryland, from November 2013 through January 2014. Call, click, or stop by to start a conversation today. W E L L S FA R G O . C OM   |   1- 8 0 0 - 3 5 -W E L L S ( 1- 8 0 0 - 3 5 9 - 3 5 5 7 ) © 2013 Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. All rights reserved. Member FDIC. (807712_07407)
  • 134. Celebrating the rich history, culture and traditions of African Americans in the City of Los Angeles www.disneyoutreach.com
  • 135. constant change. never changes. Over time market conditions will change and technologies will evolve. But at AT&T the culture of new ideas through true diversity remains constant, limitless. The diversity of our employees, suppliers and customers powers our innovation, our ability to serve you-and that has never changed. AT&T is proud to sponsor the City of Los Angeles 2013 African American Heritage Month honoring African American history and culture, and paying tribute to the contributions of past generations. © 2013 AT&T Intellectual Property. All rights reserved.
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  • 137. Music Center on Tour brings the magic of live performance to your event or school assembly. Our artists represent and celebrate artistic traditions from across the globe. Celebrate the rich history, culture and traditions of African American Heritage Month with a Music Center on Tour Artist. Diane Ferlatte (storytelling) Letters to Harriet Tubman (historical character) Rochel Garner Coleman Chic Street Man (historical character) Lula Washington Dance Theatre Got Rhythm! (dance) Lula Washington Dance Theatre (dance) Chic Street Man (music) Got Rhythm! Dancers (l to r) Lamont Keller, Mike Moorkin, Demitrius Collins, Channing Cook Holmes, Tara Cook musiccenter.org/ontour (213) 972-4310 The Music Center is Proud to be a Sponsor of African American Heritage Month.
  • 138. Coca-Cola is a proud sponsor of The City of Los Angeles African-American Heritage Month Celebra�on: Celebra�ng African-Americans at the Crossroads of Freedom and Equality!
  • 139. Valena Broussard Dismukes, Mandela and Bars, Photograph
  • 140. 201 North Figueroa Street, Suite 1400 Los Angeles, California 90012 TEL 213.202.5500 FAX 213.202.5517 WEB culturela.org Bernard Hoyes, Possession Scene, Photograph

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