Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
0
Topshop Presentation
Topshop Presentation
Topshop Presentation
Topshop Presentation
Topshop Presentation
Topshop Presentation
Topshop Presentation
Topshop Presentation
Topshop Presentation
Topshop Presentation
Topshop Presentation
Topshop Presentation
Topshop Presentation
Topshop Presentation
Topshop Presentation
Topshop Presentation
Topshop Presentation
Topshop Presentation
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Topshop Presentation

4,932

Published on

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
4,932
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
46
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide
  • Arcadia owns a number of other well-known retail outlets including Burton, Dorothy Perkins, Miss Selfridge and Wallis.
  • Transcript

    • 1. Topshop andDowntown Boston<br />A Statistical Analysis of the prospect of opening a Topshop retail store in downtown Boston. <br />
    • 2. What is Topshop?<br />Topshop is a chain of retail clothing stores<br />Mainly known for its women's clothing<br />Operates in more than 20 countries. <br />Separate men’s store called Topman that was created in the late 1970s <br />Owned by Arcadia Group<br />Its primary sales come from clothing and fashion accessories<br />Also produces significant online sales .<br />
    • 3. What we need to know.<br />More about consumer purchase decision<br />If there is significant demand for a Topshop retail store in downtown Boston<br />How local consumers feel about European fashion and products<br />How the current consumer market feels about shopping on a personal level<br />Where do current consumers shop?<br />How consumers feel about Topshop coming to Boston<br />
    • 4. Presentation Points…Significant Results<br />Purchase Decisions<br />Style<br />Celebrity Endorsement<br />Popularity<br />European Roots<br />Interesting Correlations in Participants’ Responses regarding Purchase Decisions<br />Style and Celebrity Endorsement<br />Style and Topshop Support<br />Celebrity Endorsement and Popularity<br />Consumer Behaviors/Attitudes<br />Clothes and Social Status<br />Topshop Support<br />G<br />
    • 5. What we did. Methodology…<br />4 page Questionnaire (56 variables)<br />Distributed to 27 participants <br />Ranged in age from 18-24 <br />Emerson College taking Paul Hackett’s courses<br />Downside<br />We only tested a small sample that did not represent the actual market population <br />
    • 6. Purchase Decisions<br />Style<br />Celebrity Endorsement<br />Popularity<br />European Roots<br />
    • 7. Style as a Factor in Making a Purchase Decision<br /> The majority of participants either agreed or strongly agreed that style was an important factor when making a purchase decision<br />Only a small percentage of participants disagree that style is important<br />
    • 8. Celebrity Endorsement as a Factor in Making a Purchase Decision<br />Majority of participants expressed that celebrity endorsement was not important in making a purchase decision<br />Marketing to Boston consumers means little or no celebrity endorsement<br />
    • 9. Popularity as a Factor in Making a Purchase Decision<br />78% of participants either agreed or were neutral when prompted about popularity<br />Only 19% of participants disagreed that popularity was a factor in making a purchase decision<br />
    • 10. European Roots as a Factor in Making A Purchase Decision<br />No participants disagree that European roots are not a factor in making a purchase<br />Majority of participants agreed that European Roots are a factor in making a purchase<br />
    • 11. Review… Purchase Decision Factors<br />
    • 12. Interesting Correlations in Participants’ Responses regarding Purchase Decisions<br />Style and Celebrity Endorsement<br />Style and Topshop Support<br />Celebrity Endorsement and Popularity<br />
    • 13. Correlation between Style and Celebrity Endorsement<br />Majority of participants who either are Style advocates or are neutral on the subject think celebrity endorsement is not important<br />Only 11% of participants thought celebrity endorsement was important AND agreed that style is important<br />Despite the target market being style advocates, it appears celebrity endorsement is not necessary to market to people who agree with style<br />
    • 14. Correlations between Style and Topshop Support from Participants<br />Strong correlation between agreement in style and positive opinions towards bringing Topshop to Boston<br />The majority of those who did not think Topshop would work in the Boston, also did not agree that style is important in making a purchase decision<br />There were some participants who did not agree with style but said Topshop would work, as there were those who did agree with style that did not think it would work<br />
    • 15. Correlation Between Celebrity Endorsement and Popularity<br />The majority of participants who found celebrity endorsement neutral or unimportant also found popularity to be a moderately important factor in making a purchase decision<br />Celebrity Endorsement and Popularity are both relatively useless as marketing strategies in the current market based on statistical data. <br />…But data is inaccurate.<br />Bottom Line<br />
    • 16. Consumer Behavior/Attitudes<br />Clothes and Social Status<br />Topshop Support<br />
    • 17. Do you think Topshop will be good in Boston?<br />48% of participants answered yes, with 26% both no and undecided. <br />There are some interesting correlations between other variables and this one<br />
    • 18. Clothes as Signs of Social Status<br />82% of participants responded that clothes represent social status some of the time or definitely do (all the time)<br />18% responded either does not or definitely does not<br />This information may be valuable for marketing purposes regarding how to position Topshop as a brand in the current consumer market<br />It would mean that Topshop would have to be seen as clothes that do not represent status in order to appeal to a wider audience of potential consumers<br />

    ×