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Flash: A call for sanity
Flash: A call for sanity
Flash: A call for sanity
Flash: A call for sanity
Flash: A call for sanity
Flash: A call for sanity
Flash: A call for sanity
Flash: A call for sanity
Flash: A call for sanity
Flash: A call for sanity
Flash: A call for sanity
Flash: A call for sanity
Flash: A call for sanity
Flash: A call for sanity
Flash: A call for sanity
Flash: A call for sanity
Flash: A call for sanity
Flash: A call for sanity
Flash: A call for sanity
Flash: A call for sanity
Flash: A call for sanity
Flash: A call for sanity
Flash: A call for sanity
Flash: A call for sanity
Flash: A call for sanity
Flash: A call for sanity
Flash: A call for sanity
Flash: A call for sanity
Flash: A call for sanity
Flash: A call for sanity
Flash: A call for sanity
Flash: A call for sanity
Flash: A call for sanity
Flash: A call for sanity
Flash: A call for sanity
Flash: A call for sanity
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Flash: A call for sanity

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Ever since the infamous ‘thoughts on flash’ letter that Steve Jobs wrote in 2010, Flash has been regarded as a dying technology, abandoned in favour of HTML5 and web standards. But is HTML5 really …

Ever since the infamous ‘thoughts on flash’ letter that Steve Jobs wrote in 2010, Flash has been regarded as a dying technology, abandoned in favour of HTML5 and web standards. But is HTML5 really ready for the rich media prime-time, and does Flash really have nothing left to give? In this talk, I’ll explore some areas where Flash is continuing to make a huge impact both in and beyond the browser, cut through some of the confusion, PR fails, and straight up deception in the front end wars and share some ideas on the appropriate use cases for both Flash and HTML5 in the ever changing digital landscape.

To paraphrase Douglas Adams: if flash is dead then it hasn’t stopped moving yet.

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  • Brief introduction. Response to HTML5 talk by Tareq, with due respect. An increasingly anti-flash world, but there seems to be some confusion over what Flash actually is, and what it should be used for.
  • In 2010, Steve Jobs published an open letter entitled ‘Thoughts on Flash’. In it he outlined his opinion on web standards etc. It is the document that effectively killed flash in the browser. FUD means Fear, Uncertainty and Doubt. It is a techique that Apple, and many other corporate entities use to seed unease in the consumer base. It’s worked spectacularly well, but when you strip it down in detail, it’s misleading at best.
  • In 2010, Steve Jobs published an open letter entitled ‘Thoughts on Flash’. In it he outlined his opinion on web standards etc. It is the document that effectively killed flash in the browser. FUD means Fear, Uncertainty and Doubt. It is a techique that Apple, Adobe and many other corporate entities use to seed unease in the consumer base.
  • Video evidence!
  • So what actually is Flash, why is it dead or dying? Apple makes reference to it as a product – something which Adobe monetises and controls. In fact, the only thing which is monetised is the creation tooling, and, more recently, certain power tools (like alchemy) for high-end, monetised use cases. A stable runtime and an SDK for it is no different to the iOS SDK or Android SDK or any other Software Development platform currently around. Whether or not it’s ‘open’ is neither here nor there. It’s not supposed to be, and that’s what gives it strength.
  • The biggest change to the browser landscape has been the speed of iteration on browser technology. This is what has helped establish web browsers.
  • Every software base has a runtime. This can be the device OS or it can be another layer which interprets the code for the device it’s running on. Flash (specifically the AVM) is the runtime for swfs. So is AIR. Browsers are effectively a runtime for HTML, CSS and JS. There are big differences between compiled code and runtime code.
  • There are places where Flash is falling down. The accessibility of the Adobe tooling means that it’s all too easy to write applications without understanding exactly what’s going on under the hood, and therefore being unable to optimise. Let’s take a closer look at each of these things.
  • Every software base has a runtime. This can be the device OS or it can be another layer which interprets the code for the device it’s running on. Flash (specifically the AVM) is the runtime for swfs. So is AIR. Browsers are effictely a runtime for HTML, CSS and JS. There are big differences between compiled code and runtime code.
  • Every software base has a runtime. This can be the device OS or it can be another layer which interprets the code for the device it’s running on. Flash (specifically the AVM) is the runtime for swfs. So is AIR. Browsers are effictely a runtime for HTML, CSS and JS. There are big differences between compiled code and runtime code.
  • Every software base has a runtime. This can be the device OS or it can be another layer which interprets the code for the device it’s running on. Flash (specifically the AVM) is the runtime for swfs. So is AIR. Browsers are effictely a runtime for HTML, CSS and JS. There are big differences between compiled code and runtime code.
  • But why should it? Black negative...etc.
  • Every software base has a runtime. This can be the device OS or it can be another layer which interprets the code for the device it’s running on. Flash (specifically the AVM) is the runtime for swfs. So is AIR. Browsers are effictely a runtime for HTML, CSS and JS. There are big differences between compiled code and runtime code.
  • Blacknegative – showcase HTML5 site.
  • So let’s just look at four HTML5 and CSS3 technologies...
  • Hacks exist and good use is made of them, but they are hacks. Any non-functional code which enters the program to force it to behave causes inherent instability within the system.
  • So let’s just look at four HTML5 and CSS3 technologies...
  • By effectively, I mean consistently across platforms without hacks, or with experimental builds etc.
  • Cufon drawing into canvas fails AA
  • Every software base has a runtime. This can be the device OS or it can be another layer which interprets the code for the device it’s running on. Flash (specifically the AVM) is the runtime for swfs. So is AIR. Browsers are effictely a runtime for HTML, CSS and JS. There are big differences between compiled code and runtime code.
  • Every software base has a runtime. This can be the device OS or it can be another layer which interprets the code for the device it’s running on. Flash (specifically the AVM) is the runtime for swfs. So is AIR. Browsers are effictely a runtime for HTML, CSS and JS. There are big differences between compiled code and runtime code.
  • Every software base has a runtime. This can be the device OS or it can be another layer which interprets the code for the device it’s running on. Flash (specifically the AVM) is the runtime for swfs. So is AIR. Browsers are effictely a runtime for HTML, CSS and JS. There are big differences between compiled code and runtime code.
  • Every software base has a runtime. This can be the device OS or it can be another layer which interprets the code for the device it’s running on. Flash (specifically the AVM) is the runtime for swfs. So is AIR. Browsers are effictely a runtime for HTML, CSS and JS. There are big differences between compiled code and runtime code.
  • Every software base has a runtime. This can be the device OS or it can be another layer which interprets the code for the device it’s running on. Flash (specifically the AVM) is the runtime for swfs. So is AIR. Browsers are effictely a runtime for HTML, CSS and JS. There are big differences between compiled code and runtime code.
  • Transcript

    • 1. Flash and HTML5A call for sanityA talk by @andrewdotdobsonCreative Class Meetup | 11th November 2012 | andrew dobson
    • 2. Thoughts on FlashAn exercise in FUD
    • 3. FUD in action“Adobe’s Flash products are 100% proprietary. They are onlyavailable from Adobe, and Adobe has sole authority as to their futureenhancement, pricing, etc. While Adobe’s Flash products are widelyavailable, this does not mean they are open, since they are controlledentirely by Adobe and available only from Adobe. By almost anydefinition, Flash is a closed system.”Steve Jobs, 2010.
    • 4. Is Apple committed tostandards?Then why don’t theyimplement HTML5 video?
    • 5. Product or platform?What actually is Flash?
    • 6. Evolution of the web
    • 7. Web platformsApplication Code + RuntimeActionscript 3 and Flash/AirLAMP.NETHTML5 and the browser
    • 8. Where Flash falls downPoor coding standards (GUI)AdvertisingCompatibility
    • 9. Coding standardsKnowing how to use CS5 !=understanding a technology
    • 10. Flash banner advertisingSpecifications still in AS2AVM conflicts andperformance drag.Pressure for reform required
    • 11. CompatibilityShould flash be on mobile?
    • 12. Not everything needs to be mobile http://www.remembrance2012.co.uk/
    • 13. It’s politicalHe who controls thestandard, controls theuniverse.
    • 14. http://www.caniuse.com/
    • 15. Setting expectationsClients and users do not careabout technology
    • 16. Whichever way you cut itBrowser support is inconsistent
    • 17. WebGL support:H.264 support:
    • 18. CSS3 Transitions support:Media Query support:
    • 19. HacksCSS PieModernizrBranched sites<!– [if IE] -->
    • 20. Developer overheadStandards dev is more intensiveTesting/QAHacks and exceptionsSheer amount of typing
    • 21. A simple logo animationhttp://codepen.io/andyunleashed/pen/jnpHc http://html.adobe.com http://g-plus-follow-me-animated-button.tumblr.com/animations-examples/ae-text-effect
    • 22. Things that HTML5 cannot do(effectively)DRMWebcamStreamingFull screenAdvanced audio/DSPAdvanced animationReal-time 3DConsistent layouts, rich text and transitions
    • 23. CompromisesAccessibilityValidationConsistency (branding!)Performance
    • 24. Flash use cases1. Augmenting the browser2. Extending beyond
    • 25. Cross platform adaptiveapplicationsSingle codebase, multipledeployments, smartassets – efficient,scaleable and rapidlydeveloped.Quick porting of currentweb properties into nativeRapid visual prototyping
    • 26. Stage3D and StarlingGPU access for gaming,mobile applicationdevelopment and rapid visualprototyping
    • 27. http://gaming.adobe.com/
    • 28. Contemporary FlashdevelopmentSorry Adobe…
    • 29. ToolingAdobe’s developer tooling is largely poorPros use: Flash Develop (PC), FDTFlex SDK includes Air – be wary of beta releasesDebug tools: Monsterdebugger, Monacle (coming soon)Game dev studioAlchemy, native extentionsUnity, Cadet3D, Prefab for 3d modelling and animation
    • 30. Frameworks and open sourceGreensock – LoaderMax, TweenMax, ThrowpropsStarling and Foxhole for GPU 2DAway3D, Flare, Minko for Stage3DCasaLib – utilitiesRobotlegs, PureMVC, Gaia – Design pattern frameworksAS3NUI, In2AR, OpenCV – image processing and NUINape, Box2d – PhysicsOSMF, Tonfal, Stardust – media playback, audio, particlesMinimalcomps – UI componentsLiterally hundreds of great libs
    • 31. Summing upWhat have we learnt?
    • 32. NO IDEOLOGIES
    • 33. Thanks.@andrewdotdobson

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