Semiologia_cardio_no_2_insuficiencia_cardiaca

328 views

Published on

Diapostivas Para modulo de semiologia de Aula Virtual
Insuficiencia Cardiaca
Universidad del Magdalena
Wilman Escorcia
Semiologia

Published in: Health & Medicine
0 Comments
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
328
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
11
Comments
0
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • Definition of Heart Failure.
    There is no single definition of heart failure. Classically, heart failure is understood as the situation when the heart is incapable of maintaining a cardiac output adequate to accommodate the body’s metabolic requirements and the venous return. This concept is ambiguous and incomplete, however, because heart failure is a composite of clinical symptoms, physical signs, and abnormalities on the hemodynamic, neurohormonal, biochemical, anatomic and cellular levels. In addition, the actual cardiac output, venous return or absolute metabolic requirements are not usually measured in clinical practice. Heart failure is a syndrome characterized by symptoms and physical signs which are secondary to a change in function of the ventricles, valves or load conditions.
    Braunwald E.: Heart Diseases. W.B. Saunders Co. 1992.
  • Definition of Heart Failure.
    There is no single definition of heart failure. Classically, heart failure is understood as the situation when the heart is incapable of maintaining a cardiac output adequate to accommodate the body’s metabolic requirements and the venous return. This concept is ambiguous and incomplete, however, because heart failure is a composite of clinical symptoms, physical signs, and abnormalities on the hemodynamic, neurohormonal, biochemical, anatomic and cellular levels. In addition, the actual cardiac output, venous return or absolute metabolic requirements are not usually measured in clinical practice. Heart failure is a syndrome characterized by symptoms and physical signs which are secondary to a change in function of the ventricles, valves or load conditions.
    Braunwald E.: Heart Diseases. W.B. Saunders Co. 1992.
  • Patients with hypertension have an elevated risk of cardiovascular events compared with normotensive individuals. However, if hypertension is associated with LVH, the overall risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality increases even more.
    Data from the 32-year Framingham Heart Study follow-up of men aged 32–64 years show that the presence of LVH in patients with established hypertension nearly triples the incidence of coronary heart disease and stroke, and increases the incidence of heart failure by about 7-fold.1
    1. Kannel WB. Left ventricular hypertrophy as a risk factor in arterial hypertension. Eur Heart J 1992;13 (Suppl D):82–88.
  • This graph demonstrates that all over the United States and Europe, about half or more of patients with CHF have preserved LV systolic function. In particular, as age increases, patients are more likely to suffer from CHF due to diastolic dysfunction than CHF due to systolic dysfunction.
  • Important Concepts.
    Clinical stages in the evolution of heart failure
    Heart failure is a continuous spectrum of changes, from the subtle loss of normal function to the presence of symptoms refractory to medial therapy. The patient with cardiomyopathy may maintain overall normal ventricular function; the progression of dysfunction may be sudden or gradual. Asymptomatic ventricular dysfunction is characterized by the absence of symptoms or decline in functional capacity, even in the absence of treatment. It may be associated with different changes in cardiac physiology, including ventricular dilatation, regional wall motion abnormalities, and decreases in the LV ejection fraction and of other parameters of ventricular function. The absence of symptoms may be explained by the heart’s functional reserve capacity and by the activation of compensatory mechanisms opposing the deterioration of cardiac function. In compensated heart failure the symptoms are controlled by medical therapy. In decompensated heart failure, symptoms persist despite usual therapy and are refractory to adjustments in drugs and dosages.
  • Treatment of Heart Failure.
    Objectives
    The objectives of treatment of the patient with heart failure are many, but they may be summarized in two principles: decrease symptoms and prolong life. In daily practice, the first priority is symptom control and the best plan is to adjust to the individual patient’s particular circumstances over the course of therapy. Nevertheless, the rest of the listed objectives should not be forgotten, as medical therapy now has the potential for decreasing morbidity (hospital admissions, embolism, etc.), increasing exercise capacity (all of the usually prescribed drugs), improve the quality of life, control neurohormonal changes (ACE-I, beta blockers), retard progression (ACEI) and prolong life.
  • Treatment of Heart Failure.
    Correction of aggravating factors
    Often a lack of response to conventional therapy for heart failure is due to the presence of uncorrected aggravating or precipitating factors. It is important to always consider the possibility of such factors, particularly in cases of refractory failure. AF: atrial fibrillation.
  • Treatment of Heart Failure.
    Drugs
    This is a simple and pragmatic classification of the vast numbers and types of medications in the pharmacopoeia for the treatment of heart failure.
  • Semiologia_cardio_no_2_insuficiencia_cardiaca

    1. 1. Insuficiencia Cardiaca Dr. Wilman Escorcia Hospital Universitario Fernando Troconis Universidad del Magdalena
    2. 2. DEFINICION “Situación en la cual el corazón es incapaz de mantener un gasto cardiaco adecuado a los requerimientos metabólicos y al retorno venoso." E. Braunwald
    3. 3. DEFINICION La insuficiencia cardiaca consiste en un síndrome clínico complejo que puede resultar de cualquier daño estructural o funcional que altere la habilidad del ventrículo para llenarse o expulsar la sangre. ACC/AHA 2005 Guideline Update for the Diagnosis and Management of Chronic Heart Failure in the Adult
    4. 4. Definición de insuficiencia cardiaca I. Síntomas de insuficiencia cardiaca (en reposo o durante el ejercicio), y II. Evidencia objetiva (preferiblemente por ecocardiografía), de disfunción cardiaca (sistólica y/o diastólica)(en reposo), y (en casos donde el diagnóstico está en duda), III. Respuesta al tratamiento dirigido a la insuficiencia cardiaca. Los criterios I y II deben cumplirse en todos los casos. Guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of Chronic Heart Failure (update 2005). European Society of Cardiology
    5. 5. Panorama en U.S.A Prevalencia: aprox. 5 millones de personas Incidencia: ~ 500 000/año Consultas médicas: 12 a 15 millones/año Días hospital: 6.5 millones/año Hospitalizaciones: ~ 900 000/año Costo anual: $ 27.9 billones ACC/AHA 2005 Guideline Update for the Diagnosis and Management of Chronic Heart Failure in the Adult
    6. 6. Epidemiología  En la población europea, la prevalencia de insuficiencia cardiaca sintomática está en el rango del 0.4 al 2% (aprox. 10 millones de pacientes). Esta prevalencia aumenta rápidamente con la edad, con una mediana de 74 años.  El pronóstico de esta enfermedad en general es malo. La mitad de los pacientes con un diagnóstico de insuficiencia cardiaca mueren en los próximos 4 años, y en los pacientes con insuficiencia cardiaca severa más del 50% mueren al año. Guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of Chronic Heart Failure (update 2005). European Society of Cardiology
    7. 7. Es una de las causas más frecuentes de internamiento Su incidencia aumenta al incrementarse la edad Es la causa más frecuente de hospitalización en el anciano Mortalidad del 50-70% en pacientes clase IV Cardiol Clin 1994;12:1-8 Insuficiencia cardiaca
    8. 8. Causas de aumento en la frecuencia Envejecimiento de la población Mejoría en la sobrevida en infarto del miocardio (unidad coronaria y trombolisis) Reducción en la morbimortalidad en HTA debido a un mejor control Aumento en la prevalencia de cardiomiopatía idiopática
    9. 9. Factores de riesgo 1. Hipertrofia ventricular izquierda 2. Envejecimiento 3. Enfermedad coronaria 4. Hipertensión arterial 5. Diabetes Mellitus 6. Obesidad 7. Fumado
    10. 10. Incidencia de insuficiencia cardiaca y los factores de riesgo Riesgo ajustado por edad 35-64 años 65-94 años FR Hombres Mujeres Hombres Mujeres Colesterol 1.2 0.7 0.9 0.8 HTA 4.0** 3.0** 1.9** 1.9** Diabetes 4.4** 7.7** 2.0** 3.6** HVI-ECG 14.9** 12.8** 4.9** 5.4** Fumado 1.5** 1.1* 1.0 1.3* * p<0.05, ** p<0.001
    11. 11. HVI es un factor de riesgo independiente para AVC, insuficiencia cardiaca y EAC 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 AVC Falla cardiaca Enfermedad coronaria 2-yearage-adjustedincidence (per100patients) Hipertensión Hipertensión + HVI Kannel. Eur Heart J 1992;13 (Suppl D):82–88
    12. 12. Etiología Sobrecarga de volumen Sobrecarga de presión Pérdida de miocardio Disminución en la contractilidad Restricción al llenado
    13. 13. Etiología La enfermedad coronaria, la hipertensión y la cardiomiopatía dilatada son las causas más importantes en el mundo occidental. Hasta 30% de los pacientes con una miocardiopatía dilatada tienen una causa genética. La enfermedad valvular cardiaca es otra causa importante de insuficiencia cardiaca.
    14. 14. Infarto inicial Expansión del infarto (horas a días) Remodelado global (días a meses) Remodelado ventricular posterior a un infarto agudo Jessup M, Brozena S. Heart Failure. N Engl J Med 2003;348:2007-18.
    15. 15. Otras etiologías 1. Hipertensión arterial 2. Diabetes Mellitus 3. Enfermedades tiroideas 4. Acromegalia, feocromocitoma, hiperaldosteronismo, síndrome de Cushing 5. Embarazo (miocardiopatía peripartum) 6. Familiar (10-15%) 7. Abuso de substancias: alcohol. Uso crónico de anfetaminas y/o uso de cocaína
    16. 16. Otras etiologías 7. Agentes quimioterapéuticos: doxorrubicina y otras antraciclinas, ciclofosfamida (daño tóxico al miocito). Interleucina 2 (miocarditis eosinofílica) 8. Agentes farmacológicos: Catecolaminas en dosis altas (efecto cardiotóxico) 9. Medicamentos inotrópicos negativos y que ocasionan retención de líquido (exacerbación de una disfunción cardiaca previa)
    17. 17. Otras etiologías 10. Toxinas: plomo, arsénico y cobalto 11. Toxinas endógenas: uremia y sepsis (factor de necrosis tumoral α) 12. Enfermedades del tejido conectivo: LES, esclerodermia, polimiositis 13. Enfermedades granulomatosas: sarcoidosis 14. Enfermedades infiltrativas: amiloidosis 15. Miocarditis: virales, HIV, Chagas y otras.
    18. 18. Otras etiologías 16. Deficiencias metabólicas: Beriberi, deficiencia de carnitina, coenzima Q-10 17. Hemoglobinopatías: talasemia (sobrecarga de hierro secundario a transfusiones repetitivas), esferocitosis 18. Estados de alto gasto: hipertiroidismo, anemia crónica severa, fístulas AV, enfermedad de Paget y sepsis 19. Enfermedad valvular cardiaca 20. Idiopática (10-20%)
    19. 19. Insuficiencia cardiaca Derecha Retrógrada Izquierda Anterógrada Aguda Crónica Alto gasto Bajo gasto Congestiva Diastólica Sistólica
    20. 20. Prevalencia de la insuficiencia cardiaca USA (CHS) Finland (Helsinki) England (Poole) Sweden (Vasteras) Den. (Copen.) Spain (Asturias) Portugal (EPICA) Nether. (Rotter.) 66–103 78 75–86 - 70–84 76 75 75 ≥ 50 - > 40 60 > 25 68 55–95 65 Rango edad Media 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 8.8 8.2 7.5 6.7 6.4 4.9 4.2 2.1 4.8 4.2 5.1 3.1 4.5 2.9 1.7 1.5 Proporción con función sistólica VI disminuida Proporción con función sistólica VI conservada Prevalencia (%)
    21. 21. Estadío Descripción Ejemplos A Alto riesgo de insuficiencia cardiaca debido a la presencia de condiciones fuertemente asociadas con el desarrollo de IC, sin cardiopatía estructural o síntomas de insuficiencia cardiaca •Hipertensión, Obesidad •Enfermedad aterosclerótica •Diabetes, Síndrome Metabólico •HF de cardiomiopatía, uso de cardiotoxinas B Pacientes con enfermedad cardiaca estructural sin síntomas o signos de insuficiencia cardiaca •IM previo •Remodelado VI: HVI y FE ↓ •Valvulopatía asintomática C Enfermedad cardiaca estructural con síntomas previos o actuales de insuficiencia cardiaca •Disnea y fatiga •Tolerancia reducida al ejercicio D IC refractaria que requiere intervenciones especializadas •Síntomas marcados en reposo a pesar de tratamiento intensivo •Hospitalizaciones frecuentes ACC/AHA 2005 guideline update for the diagnosis and management of chronic heart failure in the adult ENRIESGODE INSUFICIENCIACARDIACA INSUFICIE CARDIACA Estadíos en el desarrollo de la insuficiencia cardiaca
    22. 22. Efectos hemodinámicos ICC Normal Presión de llenado ventricular Volumen latido
    23. 23. Ley de Laplace • T = tensión • P = presión • r = radio • W= grosor de pared T = P x r W
    24. 24. Respuesta neurohormonal Aldosterona Angiotensina II Norepinefrina Respuesta similar a hipovolemia
    25. 25. Remodelado ventricular en insuficiencia cardiaca diastólica y sistólica Corazón normal Hipertrofia ventricular (insuficiencia cardiaca diastólica) Dilatación ventricular (insuficiencia cardiaca sistólica) Jessup M, Brozena S. Heart Failure. N Engl J Med 2003;348:2007-18.
    26. 26. Mecanismos de compensación Mecanismo Efecto beneficioso Consecuencia deletérea Inmediato Retención sodio/agua ↑ volumen intravascular con ↑ GC y PA ↑ estrés parietal, congestión pulmonar y sistémica Vasoconstriccíón periférica ↑ retorno venoso, ↑ PA ↑ estrés parietal, congestión pulmonar ↑ frecuencia cardiaca ↑ GC ↑ MVO2 ↑ contractilidad ↑ GC ↑ MVO2 Greenberg BH, Hermann DD. Contemporary Diagnosis and Management of Heart Failure, 2002.
    27. 27. Mecanismos de compensación Mecanismo Efecto beneficioso Consecuencia deletérea Largo plazo Hipertrofia miocárdica ↑ generación de fuerza causado por un ↑ número de unidades contráctiles (sárcomeros) Normalización del estrés parietal Alteraciones funcionales y estructurales de las proteínas dentro del miocito Desbalance aporte/demanda energía ↑ fibrosis Dilatación de cámaras ↑ volumen latido ↑ estrés parietal, insuficiencia valvular 2a Greenberg BH, Hermann DD. Contemporary Diagnosis and Management of Heart Failure, 2002.
    28. 28. Manifestaciones clínicas de insuficiencia cardiaca Las manifestaciones cardinales de la insuficiencia cardiaca son la disnea y la fatiga, que limitan la tolerancia al ejercicio y la retención de líquido que puede llevar a congestión pulmonar y edema periférico.
    29. 29. Síntomas y signos Insuficiencia cardiaca congestiva 1. Disnea (de reposo o esfuerzo) 2. Disnea paroxística nocturna 3. Malestar abdominal o epigástrico 4. Náuseas o anorexia 5. Edema podálico 6. Trastornos del sueño (ansiedad) 7. Ortopnea 8. Tos 9. Ascitis 10. Aumento de peso
    30. 30. Síntomas y signos Insuficiencia cardiaca de bajo gasto 1. Fatiga fácil 2. Náuseas o anorexia 3. Pérdida de peso inexplicada 4. Trastornos de la concentración o la memoria 5. Alteraciones del sueño 6. Desnutrición 7. Tolerancia disminuida al ejercicio 8. Pérdida de masa muscular o debilidad 9. Oliguria durante el día con nicturia
    31. 31. Examen físico Inspección venosa Ingurgitación yugular (especialmente > 15 cm de H2O) Signo de Kussmaul (ausencia de colapso inspiratorio) Ondas v gigantes en el pulso yugular (insuficiencia tricuspídea severa) Reflujo abdominoyugular (sobrecarga de volumen) Hepatomegalia
    32. 32. Examen físico Inspección arterial Pulsos carotídeos (estenosis aórtica, cardiomiopatía hipertrófica), soplos (aterosclerosis) Disminución de pulsos periféricos (aterosclerosis) Pulso alternante: implica un bajo gasto cardiaco y disfunción sistólica severa del VI
    33. 33. Examen físico Perfusión periférica Extremidades frías o con vasoconstricción, con o sin cianosis leve (GC ↓ y RVS ↑) Edema: 1. Sin ingurgitación yugular: insuficiencia venosa crónica, trombosis venosa, hipoalbuminemia o hepatopatía 2. Ascitis desproporcionada al edema en MsIs: cardiomiopatía restrictiva/constrictiva o insuficiencia tricuspídea severa
    34. 34. Examen físico Palpación y percusión del tórax Latido apexiano: crecimiento cardiaco Latido sostenido con 4R, sugiere HVI Latido paraesternal bajo: HVD Ruido del cierre pulmonar palpable: hipertensión pulmonar Latido apexiano desplazado hacia abajo y hacia fuera: dilatación ventricular Acompañado de un 3R: disfunción sistólica del ventrículo izquierdo
    35. 35. Examen físico Palpación y percusión del tórax Latido apexiano: crecimiento cardiaco Latido sostenido con 4R, sugiere HVI Latido paraesternal bajo: HVD Ruido del cierre pulmonar palpable: hipertensión pulmonar Latido apexiano desplazado hacia abajo y hacia fuera: dilatación ventricular Acompañado de un 3R: disfunción sistólica del ventrículo izquierdo
    36. 36. Examen físico Auscultación Soplos cardiacos: estenosis e insuficiencia aórtica, estenosis e insuficiencia mitral Campos pulmonares: derrame pleural, crepitaciones, sibilancias (asma cardiaca) Ritmo de galope
    37. 37. Insuficiencia cardiaca izquierda
    38. 38. Insuficiencia cardiaca derecha
    39. 39. Clasificación funcional New York Heart Association Clase I.Clase I. La actividad física acostumbrada no provoca síntomas (fatiga, palpitaciones, disnea, angor). Clase II.Clase II. La actividad física acostumbrada provoca síntomas. Clase III.Clase III. La actividad física menor que la acostumbrada provoca síntomas. Clase IV.Clase IV. Síntomas en reposo.
    40. 40. Estudio Framingham MortalidadMortalidad 62 % en hombres a los 5 años 42% en mujeres a los 5 años 75% después de 9 años del inicio clínico Muerte súbitaMuerte súbita 25% en hombres, 13% en mujeres25% en hombres, 13% en mujeres
    41. 41. Pronóstico 5 40 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 Clase I/IIa Clase IV Mortalidadanua Greenberg BH, Hermann DD. Contemporary Diagnosis and Management of Heart Failure, 2002.
    42. 42. Diagnóstico diferencial Disnea con o sin edema 1. Enfermedad parenquimatosa pulmonar, obstructiva crónica o intersticial 2. Enfermedad pulmonar tromboembólica 3. Cor pulmonale 4. Hipertensión pulmonar primaria y secundaria 5. Asma inducida por el ejercicio 6. Anemia severa 7. Estenosis mitral 8. Enfermedad neuromuscular 9. Pericarditis constrictiva 10. Causas metabólicas (acidosis)
    43. 43. Diagnóstico diferencial Edema con o sin disnea 1. Síndrome nefrótico 2. Cirrosis 3. Insuficiencia venosa 4. Insuficiencia vascular combinada 5. Linfedema
    44. 44. Laboratorio 1. Hemograma completo 2. Orina 3. Sodio, potasio, calcio, magnesio 4. Nitrógeno ureico, creatinina 5. Glicemia 6. Función hepática 7. TSH
    45. 45. Exámenes de gabinete 1. ECG de 12 derivaciones y radiografía de tórax. 2. Ecocardiograma bidimensional y doppler. 3. Arteriografía coronaria en pacientes con angina o sospecha de isquemia miocárdica. Una alternativa pueden ser los estudios de imágenes (ecocardiograma con dobutamina, estudio de perfusión miocárdica con sestamibi o Talio), para valorar isquemia y viabilidad.
    46. 46. Otros exámenes Tamizaje por hemocromatosis, apnea del sueño o VIH. Pruebas diagnósticas para enfermedades reumatológicas, amiloidosis o feocromocitoma. Medición del péptido natriurético tipo B (BNP), que puede ser de utilidad en la evaluación de pacientes que se presentan en los servicios de emergencias y en quienes el diagnóstico es incierto.
    47. 47. Sobrevida Morbilidad Capacidad ejercicio Calidad de vida Cambios neurohormonales Progresión de ICC Síntomas OBJETIVOS DEL TRATAMIENTO
    48. 48. Tratamiento no farmacológico 1. Restricción moderada de sodio 2. Medición diaria del peso (uso de dosis más bajas y seguras de diuréticos) 3. Inmunización con vacunas contra influenza y neumococo 4. Actividad fisica (excepto en periodos de descompensación o en miocarditis)
    49. 49. TRATAMIENTO Corrección de factores agravantes MEDICACIONES Endocarditis Obesidad Hipertensión Actividad física Excesos en dieta Embarazo Arritmias (FA) Infecciones Hipertiroidismo Tromboembolismo
    50. 50. TRATAMIENTO TERAPIA FARMACOLOGICA DIURETICOS INOTROPICOS VASODILATORES ANTAGONISTAS NEUROHORMONALES OTROS (Ejemplos: Anticoagulantes, antiarrítmicos)

    ×