Crossover UCD Workshop Presentation

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  • The creative businesses of the future will be agnostic so far as distribution channels are concerned; their creative and commercial activity will no longer be confined to a single “silo”. We will see a much greater level of innovation and a more holistic approach to the creation and development of content. Convergence will no longer primarily be about technology platforms, but about the creation of the content itself, and the monetization of that content. Right now, on-line production, for example, still draws heavily on the skills of specialist companies, but this is changing as on-line becomes more mainline and integrated. The creative businesses of the future will no longer be defined by any particular sector of media; they will simply be companies with really good creative people working across as many areas as they can.
  • 30 projects, 12 commissions Universal feedback was that the process was as/more important than the outcome BBC commissioners love it as a way of working with indies Great way of developing real mutual understanding: quality time leads to quality ideas Knowledge and understanding, fun Definitely go for it next year. Want to scale up but to retain quality of interaction and quality of outcome. Wants to have national brief but difficulty with regional funding. Want to lock down RDAs to work with over the next month or so.
  • 30 projects, 12 commissions Universal feedback was that the process was as/more important than the outcome BBC commissioners love it as a way of working with indies Great way of developing real mutual understanding: quality time leads to quality ideas Knowledge and understanding, fun Definitely go for it next year. Want to scale up but to retain quality of interaction and quality of outcome. Wants to have national brief but difficulty with regional funding. Want to lock down RDAs to work with over the next month or so.
  • 30 projects, 12 commissions Universal feedback was that the process was as/more important than the outcome BBC commissioners love it as a way of working with indies Great way of developing real mutual understanding: quality time leads to quality ideas Knowledge and understanding, fun Definitely go for it next year. Want to scale up but to retain quality of interaction and quality of outcome. Wants to have national brief but difficulty with regional funding. Want to lock down RDAs to work with over the next month or so.
  • 30 projects, 12 commissions Universal feedback was that the process was as/more important than the outcome BBC commissioners love it as a way of working with indies Great way of developing real mutual understanding: quality time leads to quality ideas Knowledge and understanding, fun Definitely go for it next year. Want to scale up but to retain quality of interaction and quality of outcome. Wants to have national brief but difficulty with regional funding. Want to lock down RDAs to work with over the next month or so.
  • understand new media ecology share language and culture across sectors interdisciplinary collaboration develop innovative projects re-imagine public service explore of new business models network buyers and producers
  • Understanding the needs of users is one of the most critical success factors for any intranet or website project. Personas allow you to identify and communicate user needs efficiently and effectively. By developing ‘stand in’ users, based on real user data, adesign team can concentrate on designing for these archetypal users with the confidence that the needs of the broader user base will be meet. Personas are a useful tool to use throughout the project, from deciding upon the functionality to include in a release to evaluating the end product.
  • I’ve been using these six spaces to try and get people to think outside of platforms, technology, genres or formats, and to think instead of what users might be *doing* in these spaces, and what they might be doing it *for*. Using these spaces as the inspiration for designing interactions should help us to think about how users’ *feel* about the services they use, and what kinds of implicit expectations they have of the service and other users. It asks questions for people designing services, or projects that are based on these services. Who is in control of what elements of the service? What kind of conversations are users having, and with whom? What kind of behaviours are accepted, and how are they rewarded? What kind of behaviours are rejected, and what are the punishments? Secret Spaces Behaviours: Private, intimate communication, normally with only one or two others, often using private references, slang or code Expectations: Absolute privacy and control over the communication between users, and no unauthorised communication from third parties (eg spam) Examples: SMS, IM Group Spaces Behaviours: Reinforcing the identity of a self-defined group, and your position within the group, eg ‘stroking‘ behaviour to let the group share a sense of belonging, or mild competitiveness to signal hierarchies within the group (eg who has the most friends, posts, tags, etc) Expectations: A shared reference point for the group - eg a band, football club, school, workplace, region, etc. Rules about approving membership of the group, and icons for the group to signal their membership (badges, profiles, etc) Examples: Facebook, Myspace, Bebo, etc Publishing Spaces Behaviours: Creating your own content or showcasing your talents to an audience outside of your usual social group Expectations: The ability to control the context and presentation of your creative content. Ways to receive feedback, comments and advice from other users. Examples: Flickr, Youtube, Revver, etc Performing Spaces Behaviours: Playing a defined role within a game structure. Experimenting through simulation, rehearsal and teamwork to achieve a goal. Iterative exploration or repetition of activities in order to perfect their performance Expectations: A clear set of rules that is understood by all players. Clear rewards for success or failure. The ability to test the boundaries of the game structure, or to perform extravagantly to show off your talents Examples: MMORPGs, Sports, Drama Participation Spaces Behaviours: Co-ordination of lots of small individual acts to achieve a common goal. Shared belief in the goal, and advocacy to encourage participation by others. Expectations: Rules or structures that help co-ordinate activity towards the goal. The ability to create micro-communities within larger participation groups - eg a group of friends going on a political march together, or a workplace group created to train for a marathon Examples: Meetup, Threadless, CambrianHouse.com, MySociety Watching Spaces Behaviours: Passive viewing of a linear event as part of a large group. Organising a group to attend an event, and sharing experiences afterwards Expectations: Spectacle, entertainment, a feeling of thrill or joy. A shared sense of occasion, or of being taking out of your everyday existence for the duration of the event. Mementos or relics of the event (eg programmes, tickets, recordings, photos, etc) Examples: Television, Cinema, Sports, Theatre, etc
  • The study showed that the average adult spent 15 hours 45 minutes awake every day, with most people up by 09:00 and asleep by 00:00. As the study also found that the average adult spent just over seven hours a day with media, it follows that the average adult spends 45% of their waking hours undertaking some form of media or communications activity. average daily media use differs substantially by age group, perhaps reflecting the varying levels of technology access set out in Figure 1.11. People aged 16-24 used media and communications most heavily, at just over nine and a half hours a day in total; this was one fifth (22%) more than adults aged 55 and over, who consumed the lowest volume of communications activity every day - just 7 hours 47 minutes. ... but spend less time doing so The research found that the total amount of media consumed - 8 hours and 48 minutes per day - was compressed into just over 7 hours of actual time ( see Figure 1.17). Five hours and 42 minutes (342 minutes) was spent using media or communications services on their own (‘‘solus’’ activity). The remaining 3 hours 6 minutes comprised media that were being used simultaneously, and was squeezed into just 1 hour 23 minutes (83 minutes) of actual time. 16-24 year olds managed to fit just over nine and a half hours’’ worth of media into a little over six and a half hours of actual time . To achieve this, they consumed around five hours of simultaneous media per day (over half of their total daily media activity) in less than two hours of actual time (29% of the time they spend with media). In terms of actual time spent consuming media, 45-54 year olds spent the most time on an average day (at 7 hours 22 minutes), and 16-24 year olds the least time (6 hours 35 minutes).
  • how well do you really know consumers when you spend all your time trolling demographic statistics? Chances are not much more than vagaries such as age, gender, ethnicity, along with a few averages in categories like income. Demographics worked well in the age of splatter-gun marketing to the masses. At least then demographics made the random messaging a little less random. If new a majority of your brands’ customers were white women ages 25-35, then you could be sure to reach majority of women that fit that profile in between the weekly soap operas. But as we all know, mass-blast advertising isn’t quite as effective as it once was, and now demographics just aren’t making the cut. Consumers want brands that they can relate to and brands that relate to them–brands founded on core, unchanging principles, beliefs and values –and not on ever changing campaigns and taglines, tweaked to fit perceived changes in demographics.
  • how well do you really know consumers when you spend all your time trolling demographic statistics? Chances are not much more than vagaries such as age, gender, ethnicity, along with a few averages in categories like income. Demographics worked well in the age of splatter-gun marketing to the masses. At least then demographics made the random messaging a little less random. If new a majority of your brands’ customers were white women ages 25-35, then you could be sure to reach majority of women that fit that profile in between the weekly soap operas. But as we all know, mass-blast advertising isn’t quite as effective as it once was, and now demographics just aren’t making the cut. Consumers want brands that they can relate to and brands that relate to them–brands founded on core, unchanging principles, beliefs and values –and not on ever changing campaigns and taglines, tweaked to fit perceived changes in demographics.
  • By delaying the move to independent living (through staying in education and/or continuing to live with their parents), many young people are delaying their full entry into many consumer marketplaces. They are less likely to be involved on a regular basis in routine purchases such as grocery shopping. For many, therefore, shopping is much closer to a leisure activity than a chore. The young are, to a greater degree than their elders, ‘leisure’ consumers – that is, consumers of leisure items and services, rather than groceries and mundane purchases. More of their shopping activity will revolve around branded clothing and consumer durables. Especially for those who are earning an income but who are not yet burdened by dependent children or mortgages, consumption will be mainly a question of spending their money on themselves. Those who live at their parents’ home are unlikely to be paying substantial, if any, rent, so that they will have extra money to spend. They are also likely to have more discretionary time for shopping. It is unsurprising, therefore, that young people are most enthusiastic about shopping – and this goes for men as well as women (the above chart shows that the proportion of people who agree that they ‘enjoy shopping and buying new things’ is higher amongst younger groups). Today’s young people might be ideally geared towards the probable shift in the retailers’ offer in the future. It seems likely that we will move more and more towards an ‘experience economy’, with shopping as a social, leisure activity, whilst routine shopping such as groceries will be done increasingly by remote, non-time-consuming means.
  • It could be argued that today’s young don’t need to be rebellious and ground-breaking because they have grown up in a more liberal and tolerant society. They don’t need to assert their freedom - they have it already. Society as a whole has become more tolerant and cosmopolitan in its outlook. Younger people tend to more liberal than older people, but the age gap in terms of liberal values has closed significantly in the last twenty years. For example, a higher proportion of the under-35s express tolerance towards homosexuality than the rest of the population. Almost half of them agree with the statement “Homosexual relations are as acceptable as heterosexual relations.” This represents an increase in tolerance among the young since the mid-1980s. A greater relative shift, however, has occurred among the over-55s – with the number of people agreeing with the statement more than doubling since the mid-1980s – but that is because they began from a smaller base of tolerance. Similarly, the young are most tolerant in their views on nationality. They are more accepting than older age groups in their attitudes towards people from other countries and they are less likely to define themselves by their national background. This is a generation that has always known the UK as a member of the EU – and a generation that was born decades after the World Wars. There has been a decline in nationalist feelings among all age groups over the past two decades and, while the young remain most relaxed in their attitudes, the age gap in terms of tolerance has closed considerably.
  • Tribal alliances are less hard and fast than they once were. The exchange of ideas is more fluid; the social glues that unite people more varied - you might disagree on which band is best, but you could still share a loyalty for Topshop, Sony PlayStation or Channel 4. Thus, understanding the dynamics of tribal UK is essential for brands who wish to engage and, vitally, become part of the conversation..
  • Traditionally, companies focus on demographics to describe their consumers. Things like age, education, income, where they live and, to a degree, what they buy are used to define groups of consumers. That will soon be a thing of the past. Getting back to the lost tribe of America, more useful models of thinking about consumers incorporate the idea of “lifestyle tribes.” The premise is that belief systems and values are used to identify and understand consumer groups. These tribes are held together by a common way of seeing the world. Looking deeper than demographics, or even psychographics, these models give us new ways to see how people group together and show us a new American market emerging right under our noses. This new way of thinking shows consumers clustering around ideas, beliefs and values, not just age or income.
  • Understanding the needs of users is one of the most critical success factors for any intranet or website project. Personas allow you to identify and communicate user needs efficiently and effectively. By developing ‘stand in’ users, based on real user data, adesign team can concentrate on designing for these archetypal users with the confidence that the needs of the broader user base will be meet. Personas are a useful tool to use throughout the project, from deciding upon the functionality to include in a release to evaluating the end product.
  • Crossover UCD Workshop Presentation

    1. 1. artist citizen entrepreneur “ making stuff people-shaped” user-centred design
    2. 2. interdisciplinary collaboration
    3. 3. idea generation
    4. 4. value proposition
    5. 5. user centred design
    6. 6. pitching
    7. 7. meet market
    8. 8. artist citizen entrepreneur story story user story platform story impact story money story five stories
    9. 12. evaluation Going large Straits of Necessity the brief Funnel of Focus groan zone selection Cloud of Potential Concept brainstorming emergent thinking mapping convergent thinking divergent thinking
    10. 15. artist citizen entrepreneur
    11. 16. artist citizen entrepreneur “ Can help your organisation connect better with the people you serve” “ transform data into actionable ideas” “ help you see new opportunities” “ help to increase the speed and effectiveness of creating new solutions” ideo: “ human centered design”
    12. 22. Secret Spaces Mobile, SMS, IM Group Spaces Bebo, Facebook, Tagged, etc Publishing Spaces Livejournal, Blogger, Flickr, Photobucket, etc Performing Spaces Second Life, World of Warcraft, Home, etc Participation Spaces Marches, Meetings, Markets, Events etc Watching Spaces Television, Gigs, Theatre, etc
    13. 23. media use in the UK by age
    14. 24. adoption technology by age
    15. 25. lifestyle and media activity
    16. 26. media usage by age
    17. 27. media activity by the hour
    18. 28. media consumption per day
    19. 29. What’s up with 25-35’s? Insight Team BBC Marketing & Communications Room 800 Broadcasting House
    20. 30. <ul><li>An empowered and open-minded lot </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Phenomenal increases in higher/further education in the last 20 years with 50% of all 15-24 year olds now in full time education </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Dance culture and clubbing democratised these people’s attitudes by bringing together backgrounds </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Attitudes to drugs, safe sex more homogenised than previous generations </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>The liberated consumer </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>liberal and tolerant values </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>spirit of entrepreneurialism and self-reliance </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>active social lives </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>technologically literate - familiar and comfortable with the new technologies </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>keen on mobility and contactability </li></ul></ul>Empowered and Open-minded Insight Team BBC Marketing & Communications TGI Survey 2001
    21. 31. Empowered consumers Proportion who enjoy going to the shops and buying new things, by gender and age How much do you agree or disagree with the following statement: &quot;I enjoy going to the shops and buying new things&quot;: agree strongly/agree/neither agree nor disagree/disagree/disagree strongly/don't know Source: 'Changing Lives', nVision Base: 1000 adults 16+, 2001 Insight team, BBC Marketing & Communications
    22. 32. % who agree that homosexual relations are as acceptable as heterosexual relations, by age, gender and young ABC1 How much do you agree or disagree with the statement: &quot;Homosexual relations are as acceptable as heterosexual relations&quot; (Chart shows those who strongly agree and agree) Source: 'Changing Lives', nVision/Taylor Nelson Sofres Base: 1000 adults 16+ Insight team, BBC Marketing & Communications Open minded generation
    23. 33. artist citizen entrepreneur “ people clustering around ideas, beliefs, values, not just age and income” tribes: rethinking demographics
    24. 35. Potential Triggers ENTERTAIN> For Self & Family DEVELOP> For Self & Family HELP> Beyond Beginner (Guidance)
    25. 37. Entertainment Navigation & Guidance Learning & Development
    26. 39. artist citizen entrepreneur “ fictional representations of target users to help guide decisions about features, navigation and visual design” personas: user archetypes
    27. 41. MY CBBC Personas Arabella Favourite Things: Stickers, Kerching!, Shopping with her mum, Horses, Anne Foye, dogs and puppies Hates: Having to watch what her older brother tells her to on TV. Arabella hates boys who are always messy. Background: Born in Wales but moved to Surrey, lives with her parents in a village to be near the riding school. Internet Use: Bit of a browser. Enjoys MSN'ing friends and is sometimes allowed to download music from iTunes. Telling quote: &quot;I like to have different ways of talking to my friends and showing them cool things I have found.&quot;
    28. 44. newton project
    29. 48. <ul><li>Basic Information </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Name, Age, Gender, Key Characteristics </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>Background </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Home Life/Work Life/Life Style </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>Needs, goals, aspirations </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Get beneath the surface: articulated and unarticulated needs </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>Media </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>TV? Web? Music? Print? Mobile? Etc? </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>Technology Usage and Expertise </li></ul><ul><li>Tribes </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Communities of interest, niches, could be multi-age, multi-background, ethnicity etc </li></ul></ul></ul></ul>template for a persona
    30. 51. artist citizen entrepreneur SRI: Value Creation Important Client Needs Champions Productive Teams Value Creation Process Human Imperatives Organisational Alignment
    31. 52. artist citizen entrepreneur SRI “value proposition” N - A - B - C Customer/Market NEEDS Compelling APPROACH Client BENEFITS Worldwide COMPETITION
    32. 53. artist citizen entrepreneur value creation process develop a value proposition arrange a “wateringhole” pitch re-iterate
    33. 54. “ Watering Holes” support and encouragment for the champion brainstorming new ideas - new perspectives a source of knowledge market domain, technology, business models, customers a source of resources £££, Jungle Guides, colleagues, coaches a place to bring interdisciplinary skills rehearsal
    34. 55. “ Watering Holes” support and encouragment for the champion Brainstorming new ideas - new perspectives a source of knowledge market domain, technology, business models, customers a source of resources £££, Jungle Guides, colleagues, coaches a place to bring interdisciplinary skills rehearsal

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