The culture of cmmi

1,150 views
1,049 views

Published on

An attempt to make sense out of CMMI implementations in several cultures around the world. How large is the influence of the US and DoD culture?
And an attempt to using principles from exegesis and hermeneutics to interpret CMMI correctly.

Published in: Spiritual, Technology
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
1,150
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
348
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
27
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide






  • Power Distance Index that is the extent to which the less powerful members of organizations and institutions (like the family) accept and expect that power is distributed unequally. This represents inequality (more versus less), but defined from below, not from above. It suggests that a society's level of inequality is endorsed by the followers as much as by the leaders. Power and inequality, of course, are extremely fundamental facts of any society and anybody with some international experience will be aware that 'all societies are unequal, but some are more unequal than others'.
  • Individualism on the one side versus its opposite, collectivism, that is the degree to which individuals are inte-grated into groups. On the individualist side we find societies in which the ties between individuals are loose: everyone is expected to look after him/herself and his/her immediate family. On the collectivist side, we find societies in which people from birth onwards are integrated into strong, cohesive in-groups, often extended families (with uncles, aunts and grandparents) which continue protecting them in exchange for unquestioning loyalty. The word 'collectivism' in this sense has no political meaning: it refers to the group, not to the state. Again, the issue addressed by this dimension is an extremely fundamental one, regarding all societies in the world.
  • Masculinity versus its opposite, femininity, refers to the distribution of roles between the genders which is another fundamental issue for any society to which a range of solutions are found. The IBM studies revealed that (a) women's values differ less among societies than men's values; (b) men's values from one country to another contain a dimension from very assertive and competitive and maximally different from women's values on the one side, to modest and caring and similar to women's values on the other. The assertive pole has been called 'masculine' and the modest, caring pole 'feminine'. The women in feminine countries have the same modest, caring values as the men; in the masculine countries they are somewhat assertive and competitive, but not as much as the men, so that these countries show a gap between men's values and women's values.
  • Uncertainty Avoidance Index deals with a society's tolerance for uncertainty and ambiguity; it ultimately refers to man's search for Truth. It indicates to what extent a culture programs its members to feel either uncomfortable or comfortable in unstructured situations. Unstructured situations are novel, unknown, surprising, different from usual. Uncertainty avoiding cultures try to minimize the possibility of such situations by strict laws and rules, safety and security measures, and on the philosophical and religious level by a belief in absolute Truth; 'there can only be one Truth and we have it'. People in uncertainty avoiding countries are also more emotional, and motivated by inner nervous energy. The opposite type, uncertainty accepting cultures, are more tolerant of opinions different from what they are used to; they try to have as few rules as possible, and on the philosophical and religious level they are relativist and allow many currents to flow side by side. People within these cultures are more phlegmatic and contemplative, and not expected by their environment to express emotions.
  • Long-Term Orientation versus short-term orientation: this fifth dimension was found in a study among students in 23 countries around the world, using a questionnaire designed by Chinese scholars It can be said to deal with Virtue regardless of Truth. Values associated with Long Term Orientation are thrift and perseverance; values associated with Short Term Orientation are respect for tradition, fulfilling social obligations, and protecting one's 'face'. Both the positively and the negatively rated values of this dimension are found in the teachings of Confucius, the most influential Chinese philosopher who lived around 500 B.C.; however, the dimension also applies to countries without a Confucian heritage.

  • Implications on CMMI:
    IDV - roles and responsibilities are assumed to be assigned to individuals
    IDV - tasks are assumed to be assigned to individuals
    MAS - managers are assumed to take leadership, manage and control
    LTO – low LTO needs to be compensated for in plans and strategies
    PDI – low PDI needs to be compensated for in authority by role, and backing by senior management
    IDV – low IDV needs to be compensated for, team work (IPPD) does not come automatically
  • High PDI – so less control needed
    Low IDV – group think
    Low MAS
    Very high UAI – the longest risk lists in world? (Second rank after Greece)



  • Als een auteur een geschiedenis beschrijft, dan begint dat met zijn perceptie van die geschiedenis.
    Afhankelijk van zijn wereldbeeld heeft hij meer/minder oog voor bepaalde zaken, bijv. Lucas de arts heeft veel meer oog voor de wonderen die Jezus deed dan de andere evangelisten.
    Veel dingen die in die tijd normaal waren worden niet beschreven of slechts kort aangestipt. Bijvoorbeeld de positie van een hereboer in “de verloren zoon”.

    Dan beschrijft de auteur het verhaal. Daarbij maakt hij keuzes. Op sommige zaken wil hij bewust de nadruk leggen, andere zaken laat hij weg.

    De lezer heeft zijn wereldbeeld. Dat is natuurlijk - na enkele duizenden jaren - geheel anders dan dat van de auteur. Met dit wereldbeeld wordt de tekst gelezen en geinterpreteeerd.

    Na interpretatie kan de gelovige dan Gods woord in de praktijk brengen.

    De ongeschoolde lezer pakt vaak gewoon de tekst op, interpreteert die, en gaat ermee aan de slag. Hieraan is wel het risico van misinterpretatie verbonden.
    De theologische wetenschap zegt dat we de interpretatie in 2 stappen moeten uitvoeren. Eerst exegese, dan hermeneutiek.
  • Als een auteur een geschiedenis beschrijft, dan begint dat met zijn perceptie van die geschiedenis.
    Afhankelijk van zijn wereldbeeld heeft hij meer/minder oog voor bepaalde zaken, bijv. Lucas de arts heeft veel meer oog voor de wonderen die Jezus deed dan de andere evangelisten.
    Veel dingen die in die tijd normaal waren worden niet beschreven of slechts kort aangestipt. Bijvoorbeeld de positie van een hereboer in “de verloren zoon”.

    Dan beschrijft de auteur het verhaal. Daarbij maakt hij keuzes. Op sommige zaken wil hij bewust de nadruk leggen, andere zaken laat hij weg.

    De lezer heeft zijn wereldbeeld. Dat is natuurlijk - na enkele duizenden jaren - geheel anders dan dat van de auteur. Met dit wereldbeeld wordt de tekst gelezen en geinterpreteeerd.

    Na interpretatie kan de gelovige dan Gods woord in de praktijk brengen.

    De ongeschoolde lezer pakt vaak gewoon de tekst op, interpreteert die, en gaat ermee aan de slag. Hieraan is wel het risico van misinterpretatie verbonden.
    De theologische wetenschap zegt dat we de interpretatie in 2 stappen moeten uitvoeren. Eerst exegese, dan hermeneutiek.
  • Als een auteur een geschiedenis beschrijft, dan begint dat met zijn perceptie van die geschiedenis.
    Afhankelijk van zijn wereldbeeld heeft hij meer/minder oog voor bepaalde zaken, bijv. Lucas de arts heeft veel meer oog voor de wonderen die Jezus deed dan de andere evangelisten.
    Veel dingen die in die tijd normaal waren worden niet beschreven of slechts kort aangestipt. Bijvoorbeeld de positie van een hereboer in “de verloren zoon”.

    Dan beschrijft de auteur het verhaal. Daarbij maakt hij keuzes. Op sommige zaken wil hij bewust de nadruk leggen, andere zaken laat hij weg.

    De lezer heeft zijn wereldbeeld. Dat is natuurlijk - na enkele duizenden jaren - geheel anders dan dat van de auteur. Met dit wereldbeeld wordt de tekst gelezen en geinterpreteeerd.

    Na interpretatie kan de gelovige dan Gods woord in de praktijk brengen.

    De ongeschoolde lezer pakt vaak gewoon de tekst op, interpreteert die, en gaat ermee aan de slag. Hieraan is wel het risico van misinterpretatie verbonden.
    De theologische wetenschap zegt dat we de interpretatie in 2 stappen moeten uitvoeren. Eerst exegese, dan hermeneutiek.
  • Als een auteur een geschiedenis beschrijft, dan begint dat met zijn perceptie van die geschiedenis.
    Afhankelijk van zijn wereldbeeld heeft hij meer/minder oog voor bepaalde zaken, bijv. Lucas de arts heeft veel meer oog voor de wonderen die Jezus deed dan de andere evangelisten.
    Veel dingen die in die tijd normaal waren worden niet beschreven of slechts kort aangestipt. Bijvoorbeeld de positie van een hereboer in “de verloren zoon”.

    Dan beschrijft de auteur het verhaal. Daarbij maakt hij keuzes. Op sommige zaken wil hij bewust de nadruk leggen, andere zaken laat hij weg.

    De lezer heeft zijn wereldbeeld. Dat is natuurlijk - na enkele duizenden jaren - geheel anders dan dat van de auteur. Met dit wereldbeeld wordt de tekst gelezen en geinterpreteeerd.

    Na interpretatie kan de gelovige dan Gods woord in de praktijk brengen.

    De ongeschoolde lezer pakt vaak gewoon de tekst op, interpreteert die, en gaat ermee aan de slag. Hieraan is wel het risico van misinterpretatie verbonden.
    De theologische wetenschap zegt dat we de interpretatie in 2 stappen moeten uitvoeren. Eerst exegese, dan hermeneutiek.
  • Als een auteur een geschiedenis beschrijft, dan begint dat met zijn perceptie van die geschiedenis.
    Afhankelijk van zijn wereldbeeld heeft hij meer/minder oog voor bepaalde zaken, bijv. Lucas de arts heeft veel meer oog voor de wonderen die Jezus deed dan de andere evangelisten.
    Veel dingen die in die tijd normaal waren worden niet beschreven of slechts kort aangestipt. Bijvoorbeeld de positie van een hereboer in “de verloren zoon”.

    Dan beschrijft de auteur het verhaal. Daarbij maakt hij keuzes. Op sommige zaken wil hij bewust de nadruk leggen, andere zaken laat hij weg.

    De lezer heeft zijn wereldbeeld. Dat is natuurlijk - na enkele duizenden jaren - geheel anders dan dat van de auteur. Met dit wereldbeeld wordt de tekst gelezen en geinterpreteeerd.

    Na interpretatie kan de gelovige dan Gods woord in de praktijk brengen.

    De ongeschoolde lezer pakt vaak gewoon de tekst op, interpreteert die, en gaat ermee aan de slag. Hieraan is wel het risico van misinterpretatie verbonden.
    De theologische wetenschap zegt dat we de interpretatie in 2 stappen moeten uitvoeren. Eerst exegese, dan hermeneutiek.

  • Als een auteur een geschiedenis beschrijft, dan begint dat met zijn perceptie van die geschiedenis.
    Afhankelijk van zijn wereldbeeld heeft hij meer/minder oog voor bepaalde zaken, bijv. Lucas de arts heeft veel meer oog voor de wonderen die Jezus deed dan de andere evangelisten.
    Veel dingen die in die tijd normaal waren worden niet beschreven of slechts kort aangestipt. Bijvoorbeeld de positie van een hereboer in “de verloren zoon”.

    Dan beschrijft de auteur het verhaal. Daarbij maakt hij keuzes. Op sommige zaken wil hij bewust de nadruk leggen, andere zaken laat hij weg.

    De lezer heeft zijn wereldbeeld. Dat is natuurlijk - na enkele duizenden jaren - geheel anders dan dat van de auteur. Met dit wereldbeeld wordt de tekst gelezen en geinterpreteeerd.

    Na interpretatie kan de gelovige dan Gods woord in de praktijk brengen.

    De ongeschoolde lezer pakt vaak gewoon de tekst op, interpreteert die, en gaat ermee aan de slag. Hieraan is wel het risico van misinterpretatie verbonden.
    De theologische wetenschap zegt dat we de interpretatie in 2 stappen moeten uitvoeren. Eerst exegese, dan hermeneutiek.
  • Als een auteur een geschiedenis beschrijft, dan begint dat met zijn perceptie van die geschiedenis.
    Afhankelijk van zijn wereldbeeld heeft hij meer/minder oog voor bepaalde zaken, bijv. Lucas de arts heeft veel meer oog voor de wonderen die Jezus deed dan de andere evangelisten.
    Veel dingen die in die tijd normaal waren worden niet beschreven of slechts kort aangestipt. Bijvoorbeeld de positie van een hereboer in “de verloren zoon”.

    Dan beschrijft de auteur het verhaal. Daarbij maakt hij keuzes. Op sommige zaken wil hij bewust de nadruk leggen, andere zaken laat hij weg.

    De lezer heeft zijn wereldbeeld. Dat is natuurlijk - na enkele duizenden jaren - geheel anders dan dat van de auteur. Met dit wereldbeeld wordt de tekst gelezen en geinterpreteeerd.

    Na interpretatie kan de gelovige dan Gods woord in de praktijk brengen.

    De ongeschoolde lezer pakt vaak gewoon de tekst op, interpreteert die, en gaat ermee aan de slag. Hieraan is wel het risico van misinterpretatie verbonden.
    De theologische wetenschap zegt dat we de interpretatie in 2 stappen moeten uitvoeren. Eerst exegese, dan hermeneutiek.
  • Als een auteur een geschiedenis beschrijft, dan begint dat met zijn perceptie van die geschiedenis.
    Afhankelijk van zijn wereldbeeld heeft hij meer/minder oog voor bepaalde zaken, bijv. Lucas de arts heeft veel meer oog voor de wonderen die Jezus deed dan de andere evangelisten.
    Veel dingen die in die tijd normaal waren worden niet beschreven of slechts kort aangestipt. Bijvoorbeeld de positie van een hereboer in “de verloren zoon”.

    Dan beschrijft de auteur het verhaal. Daarbij maakt hij keuzes. Op sommige zaken wil hij bewust de nadruk leggen, andere zaken laat hij weg.

    De lezer heeft zijn wereldbeeld. Dat is natuurlijk - na enkele duizenden jaren - geheel anders dan dat van de auteur. Met dit wereldbeeld wordt de tekst gelezen en geinterpreteeerd.

    Na interpretatie kan de gelovige dan Gods woord in de praktijk brengen.

    De ongeschoolde lezer pakt vaak gewoon de tekst op, interpreteert die, en gaat ermee aan de slag. Hieraan is wel het risico van misinterpretatie verbonden.
    De theologische wetenschap zegt dat we de interpretatie in 2 stappen moeten uitvoeren. Eerst exegese, dan hermeneutiek.
  • Als een auteur een geschiedenis beschrijft, dan begint dat met zijn perceptie van die geschiedenis.
    Afhankelijk van zijn wereldbeeld heeft hij meer/minder oog voor bepaalde zaken, bijv. Lucas de arts heeft veel meer oog voor de wonderen die Jezus deed dan de andere evangelisten.
    Veel dingen die in die tijd normaal waren worden niet beschreven of slechts kort aangestipt. Bijvoorbeeld de positie van een hereboer in “de verloren zoon”.

    Dan beschrijft de auteur het verhaal. Daarbij maakt hij keuzes. Op sommige zaken wil hij bewust de nadruk leggen, andere zaken laat hij weg.

    De lezer heeft zijn wereldbeeld. Dat is natuurlijk - na enkele duizenden jaren - geheel anders dan dat van de auteur. Met dit wereldbeeld wordt de tekst gelezen en geinterpreteeerd.

    Na interpretatie kan de gelovige dan Gods woord in de praktijk brengen.

    De ongeschoolde lezer pakt vaak gewoon de tekst op, interpreteert die, en gaat ermee aan de slag. Hieraan is wel het risico van misinterpretatie verbonden.
    De theologische wetenschap zegt dat we de interpretatie in 2 stappen moeten uitvoeren. Eerst exegese, dan hermeneutiek.
  • Als een auteur een geschiedenis beschrijft, dan begint dat met zijn perceptie van die geschiedenis.
    Afhankelijk van zijn wereldbeeld heeft hij meer/minder oog voor bepaalde zaken, bijv. Lucas de arts heeft veel meer oog voor de wonderen die Jezus deed dan de andere evangelisten.
    Veel dingen die in die tijd normaal waren worden niet beschreven of slechts kort aangestipt. Bijvoorbeeld de positie van een hereboer in “de verloren zoon”.

    Dan beschrijft de auteur het verhaal. Daarbij maakt hij keuzes. Op sommige zaken wil hij bewust de nadruk leggen, andere zaken laat hij weg.

    De lezer heeft zijn wereldbeeld. Dat is natuurlijk - na enkele duizenden jaren - geheel anders dan dat van de auteur. Met dit wereldbeeld wordt de tekst gelezen en geinterpreteeerd.

    Na interpretatie kan de gelovige dan Gods woord in de praktijk brengen.

    De ongeschoolde lezer pakt vaak gewoon de tekst op, interpreteert die, en gaat ermee aan de slag. Hieraan is wel het risico van misinterpretatie verbonden.
    De theologische wetenschap zegt dat we de interpretatie in 2 stappen moeten uitvoeren. Eerst exegese, dan hermeneutiek.



  • The culture of cmmi

    1. 1. The Culture of CMMI Understanding and implementing CMMI in different cultures
    2. 2. Contents Experience Hofstede Application to CMMI Analysis of text Conclusions 2
    3. 3. Experience Netherlands Estimation Sheet Germany Estimation Model Sweden Consensus USA Quick decisions South Korea Truth in pub only India Draft Findings Presentation 3
    4. 4. Contents Experience Hofstede Application to CMMI Analysis of text Conclusions 4
    5. 5. even an iPhone app! 5
    6. 6. The Five Dimensions PDI Power Distance IND Individuality MAS Masculinity UAI Uncertainty Avoidance LTO Long Term Orientation 6
    7. 7. Power Distance • How much the less powerful members of institutions and organizations expect and accept that power is distributed unequally. • In cultures with small power distance (e.g. Australia, Austria, Denmark, Ireland, New Zealand), people expect and accept power relations that are more consultative or democratic. People relate to one another more as equals regardless of formal positions. Subordinates are more comfortable with and demand the right to contribute to and critique the decisions of those in power. In cultures with large power distance (e.g. Malaysia), the less powerful accept power relations that are autocratic or paternalistic. Subordinates acknowledge the power of others based on their formal, hierarchical positions. • Thus, Small vs. Large Power Distance does not measure or attempt to measure a culture's objective, "real" power distribution, but rather the way people perceive power differences.. 7
    8. 8. Individuality • How much members of the culture define themselves apart from their group memberships. • In individualist cultures, people are expected to develop and display their individual personalities and to choose their own affiliations. In collectivist cultures, people are defined and act mostly as a member of a long-term group, such as the family, a religious group, an age cohort, a town, or a profession, among others. This dimension was found to move towards the individualist end of the spectrum with increasing national wealth 8
    9. 9. Masculinity • The value placed on traditionally male or female values (as understood in most Western cultures). In so-called 'masculine' cultures, people (whether male or female) value competitiveness, assertiveness, ambition, and the accumulation of wealth and material possessions. In so- called 'feminine' cultures, people (again whether male or female) value relationships and quality of life. • This dimension is often renamed by users of Hofstede's work, e.g. to Quantity of Life vs. Quality of Life 9
    10. 10. Uncertainty avoidance • What is different is dangerous • How much members of a society are anxious about the unknown, and as a consequence, attempt to cope with anxiety by minimizing uncertainty. In cultures with strong uncertainty avoidance, people prefer explicit rules (e.g. about religion and food) and formally structured activities, and employees tend to remain longer with their present employer. In cultures with weak uncertainty avoidance, people prefer implicit or flexible rules or guidelines and informal activities. Employees tend to change employers more frequently 10
    11. 11. Long Term Orientation • A society's "time horizon," or the importance attached to the future versus the past and present. In long term oriented societies, people value actions and attitudes that affect the future: persistence/perseverance, thrift, and shame. In short term oriented societies, people value actions and attitudes that are affected by the past or the present: normative statements, immediate stability, protecting one's own face, respect for tradition, andreciprocation of greetings, favors, and gifts. 11
    12. 12. 110 Some numbers 83 55 28 0 PDI IDV MAS UAI LTO Netherlands Spain Portugal France Germany Russia Great Britain United States 12
    13. 13. CMMI is an american model 13
    14. 14. and Portugal? 14
    15. 15. Contents Experience Hofstede Application to CMMI Analysis of text Conclusions 15
    16. 16. Analysis of text Lessons from philosophy and theology 16
    17. 17. Interpreting texts • ex·e·ge·sis • to explain, interpret • What it meant – in the original context • her·me·neu·tic • 1: the study of the methodological principles of interpretation (as of the Bible) 2 : a method or principle of interpretation • What it means – in the current context 17
    18. 18. Exegesis and hermeneutics Perception Choices Perception Choices World view Intentions World view Intentions Reality Adoption Author Reader Exegesis Hermeneutics “what did it mean?” “what does it mean?” 18
    19. 19. Exegesis and hermeneutics American culture • plan driven Perception Choices World view Intentions • hierarchy Defence • few, large projects • safety Reality • embedded software Author CMMI Team • experience Exegesis • frustrations “what did it mean?” 19
    20. 20. Exegesis and hermeneutics What is my vision on Perception Choices mature organisations? World view Intentions • positive experience • education What is my “political” Reality aspiration? Author • CMU faculties • personal ambitions •… Exegesis “what did it mean?” 20
    21. 21. Exegesis and hermeneutics Dutch culture Perception Choices World view Intentions • anti-authoritarian • consensus Services-economy • smaller projects Adoption Personal experience Reader • matrix organisation • leadership Hermeneutics • drop back in level “what does it mean?” 21
    22. 22. Perception Choices World view Intentions Achieve business goals • better, faster, cheaper • better work environment • learning organisation Adoption Reader Level hunting Carier for SPI officer Hermeneutics Revenue for SPI consultant “what does it mean?” 22
    23. 23. A worked example • PMC SP 1.6 - Conduct Progress Reviews • Regularly communicate status on assigned activities and work products to relevant stakeholders. … • Review the results of collecting and analyzing measures for controlling the project. … • Identify and document significant issues and deviations from the plan. • Document change requests and problems identified in any of the work products and processes. • Document the results of the reviews. • Track change requests and problem reports to closure. 23
    24. 24. Exegesis and hermeneutics Perception Choices Perception Choices World view Intentions World view Intentions Reality Adoption Author Reader Exegesis Hermeneutics “what did it mean?” “what does it mean?” 24
    25. 25. Exegesis and hermeneutics Perception Choices American culture World view Intentions • plan driven • individualistic • Large, multi-site project • No automatic overview Reality Author Meetings and reports are really needed Exegesis “what did it mean?” 25
    26. 26. Exegesis and hermeneutics What is my vision on Perception Choices mature organisations? World view Intentions • positive experience • education What is my “political” Reality aspiration? Author • CMU faculties • personal ambitions •… Exegesis “what did it mean?” 26
    27. 27. Exegesis and hermeneutics Perception Choices Dutch culture World view Intentions • frequent informal meetings • open door policy • limited hierarchy • feminine culture Adoption Reader • Small projects: 3 man, 1 room • running list of action Hermeneutics “what does it mean?” points 27
    28. 28. Perception Choices World view Intentions Achieve business goals • better, faster, cheaper • better work environment • learning organisation Adoption Reader Level hunting Carier for SPI officer Hermeneutics Plug my tracker tool “what does it mean?” 28
    29. 29. Contents Experience Hofstede Application to CMMI Analysis of text Conclusions 29
    30. 30. Conclusions • Models compensate for cultural patterns • Be aware when transferring models across cultures 30
    31. 31. In one sentence Something is not true because it is in CMMI, but something is in CMMI because it is true in the original context 31

    ×