Beyond the Open Educational Resource move – towards Open and Participatory Learning Ecosystems   Andreas Meiszner The Open...
Agenda Part 1  Introduction: Web 2.0 from an educational perspective Part 2   The case of Free / Libre Open Source Softwar...
Part 1 Web 2.0 from an educational perspective
Web 2.0 – a message beyond the hype I think we're --in a lot of ways --in a period  of the most profound reinvention of .....
Web 2.0 – the impact ICT and the web 2.0 ENABLES us to do things different and more efficiently, but they are also signifi...
Knowledge sharing & learning as an active creation process  in disperse environments Web 2.0 – or so it’s called
<ul><li>What does the future expect from us? </li></ul><ul><li>Ability of being self-taught & self-learning </li></ul><ul>...
Web 2.0 – what it brings along for our citizens
Part 2 The case of Free / Libre Open Source Software (FLOSS)  Communities
<ul><li>The diverse FLOSS learning ecosystem </li></ul>Today – The FLOSS Case
<ul><li>Content & Support in FLOSS  </li></ul>Today – The FLOSS Case
<ul><li>What does the FLOSS case show us? </li></ul><ul><li>Looking at informal virtual learning environments, like Free /...
<ul><li>A  greater   range of inputs  – not just from the educator, but from all contributors so the collective is the sou...
Part 3 The Open Educational Resource (OER) movement  A first step towards Free / Open Education!?!
Today – The OER Case, high quality, largely static Teaser & Courses from  EXPERTS
Today – OER vs. Web 2.0 & FLOSS OER from a traditional educational understanding Open education resources are little used ...
Part 1 OER from a modern understanding Open education resources are widely used… …  and also re-used and adapted… but mayb...
Today – OER vs. Web 2.0 & FLOSS Static OER vs. dynamic Web 2.0
Today – OER vs. Web 2.0 & FLOSS Re-using revised: How (re-)useful is your learning activity?
Towards OPLE Who designs what, for which reason and to which extend? <ul><li>Traditional OER are build </li></ul><ul><li>B...
<ul><li>In which way is the Web 2.0 & FLOSS approach different from the OER movement? </li></ul>Today – OER vs. Web 2.0 & ...
Part 4 Towards open and participatory learning ecosystems (OPLE) – The NetGeners.Net pilot course
Towards OPLE How could a future OPLE model look like?
<ul><li>Existence of  a great  range of inputs  with dynamic content from manifold resources </li></ul><ul><li>Sharing of ...
<ul><li>Meta-design & Courses as Seeds (also inspired by FLOSS): </li></ul><ul><li>Making changes must be possible  </li><...
<ul><li>Meta-design & Courses as Seeds (also inspired by FLOSS): </li></ul><ul><li>Creating a culture of collective inquir...
Towards OPLE Learn more about this  at the Panel Discussion  on FLOSS-like approaches in educational settings  and also th...
Thank you for your attention! Contact:  [email_address]   <ul><li>And finally...be invited to join: </li></ul><ul><li>The ...
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Beyond the Open Educational Resource move – towards Open and Participatory Learning Ecosystems

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FKFT Free Knowledge, Free Technology
Education for a free information society
First International Conference, Barcelona July 15th to 17th 2008

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Beyond the Open Educational Resource move – towards Open and Participatory Learning Ecosystems

  1. 1. Beyond the Open Educational Resource move – towards Open and Participatory Learning Ecosystems Andreas Meiszner The Open University (UK) / Sociedade Portuguesa de Inovação (PT) FKFT Free Knowledge, Free Technology Education for a free information society First International Conference, Barcelona July 15th to 17th 2008                       
  2. 2. Agenda Part 1 Introduction: Web 2.0 from an educational perspective Part 2 The case of Free / Libre Open Source Software (FLOSS) Communities Part 3 The Open Educational Resource (OER) movement Part 4 Towards open and participatory learning ecosystems (OPLE) - The NetGeners.Net pilot course
  3. 3. Part 1 Web 2.0 from an educational perspective
  4. 4. Web 2.0 – a message beyond the hype I think we're --in a lot of ways --in a period of the most profound reinvention of ...education and how people need to learn since the invention of literacy. Tim O'Reilly
  5. 5. Web 2.0 – the impact ICT and the web 2.0 ENABLES us to do things different and more efficiently, but they are also significantly CHANGE the way we live and work REQUIRING us to acquire new skills and mindsets
  6. 6. Knowledge sharing & learning as an active creation process in disperse environments Web 2.0 – or so it’s called
  7. 7. <ul><li>What does the future expect from us? </li></ul><ul><li>Ability of being self-taught & self-learning </li></ul><ul><li>Having a mental model of how the world works to let you figure out what's important </li></ul><ul><li>A new &quot;digital divide&quot; between those who know how to think about search and those who don't; those who know where the current hot information is being shared, and those who don't </li></ul><ul><li>The importance of &quot;doing things,&quot; &quot;tinkering,&quot;, and &quot;exploratory learning&quot; </li></ul><ul><li>That &quot;engagement&quot; is not new to Web 2.0, but the opportunity is being democratized by the technology </li></ul><ul><li>Source: Tim O'Reilly, May 2007 </li></ul>Web 2.0 – what it brings along for our citizens
  8. 8. Web 2.0 – what it brings along for our citizens
  9. 9. Part 2 The case of Free / Libre Open Source Software (FLOSS) Communities
  10. 10. <ul><li>The diverse FLOSS learning ecosystem </li></ul>Today – The FLOSS Case
  11. 11. <ul><li>Content & Support in FLOSS </li></ul>Today – The FLOSS Case
  12. 12. <ul><li>What does the FLOSS case show us? </li></ul><ul><li>Looking at informal virtual learning environments, like Free / Libre Open Source Software (FLOSS) communities, shows that: </li></ul><ul><li>Content is not something static but dynamic </li></ul><ul><li>Learning resources are manifold </li></ul><ul><li>Users are also active creators </li></ul><ul><li>Support and learning resources are closely connected </li></ul><ul><li>Open and transparent structures foster re-use and discourse , but also continuous improvement and evolutionary growth </li></ul><ul><li>Existence of a wide range of possible activities to engage at around the core product </li></ul><ul><li>Self-studying and learning from what others did are pre-dominant forms of learning, plus gaining soft skills “on the fly” </li></ul>Today – The FLOSS Case
  13. 13. <ul><li>A greater range of inputs – not just from the educator, but from all contributors so the collective is the source of knowledge, not one individual </li></ul><ul><li>A more personalized learning experience – instead of learning objectives that apply to a whole cohort, this approach allows learners to gather the elements of knowledge they require. </li></ul><ul><li>Greater sharing of knowledge – in (higher) education much of the previous input is lost, whereas here the dialogue, resources, and outputs remain as learning resources. </li></ul><ul><li>Peer production – active engagement in producing something with a set of peers is a powerful motivational and educational driving force. </li></ul><ul><li>Real activities – engaging in legitimate activities that are not restricted to an artificial educational setting also provides valuable experience. </li></ul><ul><li>Peer support – a large support network provided voluntarily by peers in a collaborative manner nearly 24/7. </li></ul><ul><li>Open learning environmen t – The whole is bigger than the sum of its parts, thus there is the need of providing new educational models and scenarios that are not limited to students formally enrolled at a course. </li></ul>What type of learning environment does FLOSS provides? Today – The FLOSS Case
  14. 14. Part 3 The Open Educational Resource (OER) movement A first step towards Free / Open Education!?!
  15. 15. Today – The OER Case, high quality, largely static Teaser & Courses from EXPERTS
  16. 16. Today – OER vs. Web 2.0 & FLOSS OER from a traditional educational understanding Open education resources are little used and still less adapted and repurposed Graham Attwell 2007
  17. 17. Part 1 OER from a modern understanding Open education resources are widely used… … and also re-used and adapted… but maybe not the way we thought off Today – OER vs. Web 2.0 & FLOSS
  18. 18. Today – OER vs. Web 2.0 & FLOSS Static OER vs. dynamic Web 2.0
  19. 19. Today – OER vs. Web 2.0 & FLOSS Re-using revised: How (re-)useful is your learning activity?
  20. 20. Towards OPLE Who designs what, for which reason and to which extend? <ul><li>Traditional OER are build </li></ul><ul><li>By Professionals </li></ul><ul><li>In a static manner </li></ul><ul><li>For formal settings (or similar) </li></ul><ul><li>Within a given (funded) period </li></ul><ul><li>Modern/Future OER are build </li></ul><ul><li>By professionals and passionate user </li></ul><ul><li>Involving stakeholders from formal and informal education </li></ul><ul><li>In dynamic ways and </li></ul><ul><li>Within continuous evolving environments </li></ul>
  21. 21. <ul><li>In which way is the Web 2.0 & FLOSS approach different from the OER movement? </li></ul>Today – OER vs. Web 2.0 & FLOSS <ul><li>At the current OER movement </li></ul><ul><li>We create repositories , but not learning communities </li></ul><ul><li>Content is defined and produced in the traditional way </li></ul><ul><li>Content is static , not manifold and rarely updated </li></ul><ul><li>Formal students do not directly engage with OER and thus do not engage with external students or free learners </li></ul><ul><li>Students' / Free learners' learning process and learning outcome does not become part of something (course, learning resource, product, etc)‏ </li></ul><ul><li>Support and learning resources are not connected </li></ul><ul><li>We don't really look at motivations and activities to attract free learners to become active contributors </li></ul>
  22. 22. Part 4 Towards open and participatory learning ecosystems (OPLE) – The NetGeners.Net pilot course
  23. 23. Towards OPLE How could a future OPLE model look like?
  24. 24. <ul><li>Existence of a great range of inputs with dynamic content from manifold resources </li></ul><ul><li>Sharing of knowledge and peer production with users being active creators </li></ul><ul><li>Personalized learning experience with engagement in personally meaningful activities </li></ul><ul><li>Real activities with a wide range of possible activities to engage at around the core product (e.g. think about Firefox Add-Ons ) </li></ul><ul><li>Peer support where s upport and learning resources are closely connected </li></ul><ul><li>Open learning environment with open and transparent structures that allows users to adapt them and a continuous “evolution” </li></ul><ul><li>Self-studying and learning from what others did are pre-dominant forms of learning, plus gaining soft skills “on the fly” </li></ul>FLOSS aspects that might be considered: Towards OPLE
  25. 25. <ul><li>Meta-design & Courses as Seeds (also inspired by FLOSS): </li></ul><ul><li>Making changes must be possible </li></ul><ul><li>Open to change during use time and involve all stakeholders in the design process during design time and use time Changes must be technically feasible </li></ul><ul><li>Benefits must be perceived </li></ul><ul><li>Environments must support tasks that people engage in </li></ul><ul><li>Low barriers must exist to share changes </li></ul><ul><li>Systems need to be underdesigned at design time to allow users (“owner of problems”) to create solutions at use time. </li></ul><ul><li>Taken from dePaula, Fischer, Giaccardi … for details please see: http://wiki.netgeners.net/index.php?title=Rationale </li></ul>Concepts that might be considered: (1/2) Towards OPLE
  26. 26. <ul><li>Meta-design & Courses as Seeds (also inspired by FLOSS): </li></ul><ul><li>Creating a culture of collective inquiry where... </li></ul><ul><li>Students take an active role in their own learning process that is... </li></ul><ul><li>Embedded in collaborative activities and... </li></ul><ul><li>Supported by innovative technologies... </li></ul><ul><li>With students adapting a mindset that understands that initial plans must not correspond to final outcomes and that they are... </li></ul><ul><li>Prepared for interpreting unexpected results, and... </li></ul><ul><li>Where discussions and decisions are captured and therefore... </li></ul><ul><li>Become artifacts that help future students in their learning process and... </li></ul><ul><li>Create an environment of current improvement and building upon what others built </li></ul><ul><li>Taken from dePaula, Fischer, Giaccardi … for details please see: http://wiki.netgeners.net/index.php?title=Rationale </li></ul>Concepts that might be considered: (2/2) Towards OPLE
  27. 27. Towards OPLE Learn more about this at the Panel Discussion on FLOSS-like approaches in educational settings and also the NetGeners.Net pilot
  28. 28. Thank you for your attention! Contact: [email_address] <ul><li>And finally...be invited to join: </li></ul><ul><li>The discussion on future Free / Open educational approaches at http://www.netgeners.net/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=30&Itemid=2 </li></ul><ul><li>The 2 nd course round of the NetGeners.Net pilot, starting in September 2008 at www.netgeners.net </li></ul><ul><li>For further information on the FLOSSCom project see: www.flosscom.net </li></ul>
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