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A hybrid Organizational Framework for Open Course Design - version for openSE project
 

A hybrid Organizational Framework for Open Course Design - version for openSE project

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The framework will introduce a hybrid approach to SE that builds upon the way learning and knowledge creation at the participatory web takes place, in particular within the Open Source communities. ...

The framework will introduce a hybrid approach to SE that builds upon the way learning and knowledge creation at the participatory web takes place, in particular within the Open Source communities. This is to say that on the hand the openSE environment will be open for participation of any individual interested at the subject (inviting in), and on the other hand SE students are engaging at students driven small scale learning projects, with each of those being associated to an open source project (sending out). This combination of ‘inviting in’ and ‘sending out’ is what we like to call a hybrid approach.
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    A hybrid Organizational Framework for Open Course Design - version for openSE project A hybrid Organizational Framework for Open Course Design - version for openSE project Presentation Transcript

    • open educational Framework for computer science Software Engineering This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This document reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein. 503641-LLP-1-2009-1-PT-ERASMUS-ECUE
    • OpenSE Organizational Framework Andreas Meiszner Oxford Meeting 4 – 5 of February 2010 2
    • OpenSE Organizational Framework » Aim ● To develop the openSE organizational framework » Activities ● Develop a requirements specification document (RSD) for the organizational structure, this includes ways of interaction and collaboration scenarios of the various stakeholders: educational institutions, open source projects/enterprises and formally enrolled students / free learners outside of formal education. The framework will also consider the interplay of humans and technology. ● The framework will be revised and adapted after each pilot round to meet actual user expectations and draw on the lessons learnt. 3
    • OpenSE Organizational Framework » Rationale ● The framework will introduce a hybrid approach to SE that builds upon the way learning and knowledge creation at the participatory web takes place, in particular within the Open Source communities. This is to say that on the hand the openSE environment will be open for participation of any individual interested at the subject (inviting in), and on the other hand SE students are engaging at students driven small scale learning projects, with each of those being associated to an open source project (sending out). This combination of ‘inviting in’ and ‘sending out’ is what we like to call a hybrid approach. 4
    • OpenSE Organizational Framework » Outline ● Fundamentals of hybrid Open Course Design ● Motivations & Gains ● Layers of hybrid Open Course Design ● The concept of Learning Projects, Directories and SVN type Systems 5
    • OpenSE Organizational Framework » Point of view: Course Perspective 6
    • OpenSE Organizational Framework » Fundamentals of hybrid Open Course Design ● Start from traditional course design and be aware of the ‘core’ ● Commitment to Openness & Inclusivity ● Accept an extended Group of Stakeholder to be involved ● Prepare for less Control and constant Change ● Consider Co-operation & Collaboration Arrangements ● Consider Legal Aspects 7
    • Fundamentals of hybrid Open Course Design » Start from traditional course design and be aware of the 'core' ● Keep the structuredness of traditional course design with regard to: ● clearly articulated learning objectives and outcomes, ● instructional materials, a set of learning materials that would allow to master the course, assignments and practices, and lectures or tutorials. ● Analogue to the Open Source case this ‘basic’ course might be seen as a ‘core’ that should only be changed by the ‘core developer’, e.g. the course team. ● Such a core does not only provide the level of structuredness participants likely require, but it also facilitates to deal with less control and constant change. 8
    • Fundamentals of hybrid Open Course Design » Commitment to Openness & Inclusivity ● Pre-requirement to any type of hybrid Open Course provision ● Free access, transparent structures, openly accessible, access not only to learning resources, but also communications, discussions and interactions, e.g. through forums, mailing lists or chats sessions. ● However, openness and inclusivity might be limited within a number of ways. ● To assure assessment of formally enrolled students, ‘openness to change’ might be limited for the works that formally enrolled students engage at. ● Inclusivity perhaps will be limited with regards to guaranteed support provision through educators, which likely can be taken as granted only for formally enrolled students. 9
    • Fundamentals of hybrid Open Course Design » Accept an extended Group of Stakeholders to be involved ● Possible stakeholders are: (1) fellow students and educators, (2) ‘free learners’ learners outside of formal education and (3) practitioners. ● Accept that free learners might have different expectations and motivations than their formally enrolled counterparts, that they perhaps only view what is going on, or engage in self-studying activities, but perhaps might also be very active, or that they decide to not follow the overall course but only some of its parts. ● Identify and involve practitioners of a given online ecosystems and their communities that might be involved within an Open Course scenario, such as Open Source projects. ● Considered how each stakeholder group might impact the course or engages at it, or which type of co-operation and collaboration agreements might be established. 10
    • Fundamentals of hybrid Open Course Design » Prepare for less Control and constant Change ● The involvement and use of external spaces or communities within a given Open Course might come at the price of giving up a certain degree of control or certainty. ● External communities and spaces have their established structures, practices, rules or culture and formally enrolled students that wish to engage at those would be required to behave in accordance. ● External spaces might also relate to those ones established or maintained by course participants themselves and brought into the course as a part of their active co-designer role, therefore ownership and control remains with those course participants and not the course team. ● This must be considered within Open Course design scenarios and core course components should preferably be kept within the control of the course team. 11
    • Fundamentals of hybrid Open Course Design » Consider Co-operation & Collaboration Arrangements ● Embedding external and well-established online ecosystems and their communities within Open Course scenarios comes as well with advantages as potential drawbacks. ● Potential drawbacks are a lower degree of control of those external spaces or a non-optimal use of resources, be it of a human, technological or learning resource nature. ● For this reason it might be considered to agree on certain types of collaboration and collaborations, or at the very least to be well aware about the way those ecosystems and their communities function and what the potential risks are. ● The same holds valid for courses of fellow institutions that might form a part of a given Open Course, though likely cooperation and collaboration options are more predictable. 12
    • Fundamentals of hybrid Open Course Design » Consider Legal Aspects ● Such as licensing aspects, copyright, quality assurance, or formal degree and certification aspects... 13
    • OpenSE Organizational Framework » Motivations & Gains 14
    • Motivations & Gains » Formally enrolled Students ● Motivations likely relate to exams, assignments or evaluation. ● Ex-ante those factors seem to be the strongest motivational factor for formally enrolled students to participate and become active, meanwhile ex-post it could be seen that ‘the learning experience and outcome’ appeared to be also of a high value. ● For this reason a right balance must be established between voluntary and mandatory participation. ● For formally enrolled students the submission of concrete outcomes, such as work on assignments and projects, should be an element of their overall evaluation, with clearly outlined and defined dates on what they are expected to 'deliver'. 15
    • Motivations & Gains » For Free Learners outside of formal Education ● The basic motivation seems to be ‘personal interest at the subject area’. ● In addition to this there must be the opportunity ‘to gain something’ and that this ‘gain’ must be visible; therefore adding a value to their CV. ● Such gains might be provided through visualizing the learning outcomes of participants within such an Open Course scenario and that might include a number of parameters that feature learning outcomes and allow others to assess what has been learned. ● Individual performances and commitment, artifacts created, or review of peers and crediting good contributions might be possible elements of such a portfolio. ● From a more traditional perspective, one gain might be to allow free learners outside of formal education to obtain some type of formal certificate issued through an educational institution. 16
    • Motivations & Gains » Formally enrolled Students & Free Learners ● The opportunity to produce something that participants see as their own work and can showcase to others is also a motivational factor. ● Participant should be enabled to actively shape their own learning space, so it would match their expectations and they see it as 'their' own product. ● Involvement in the openSE environment, e.g. Through wish-lists or roadmaps or co-developing opportunities, is therefore suggested. 17
    • Motivations & Gains » Educators & Practitioners ● Need to provide a win / win solutions for both of the sides involved – the formal educational side as well as the virtual community. ● The interest of both sides must mach, as well as the willingness to accept and draw on established best practices. ● Thus practitioners should be involved in the openSE design process and asked for their feedback on the pilots. 18
    • OpenSE Organizational Framework » Layers of hybrid Open Course Design 19
    • Layers of hybrid Open Course Design » Layers might be looked at from a course or overall openSE environment perspective and include: 1. Content layer 1.1 Static resources internally provided 1.2 Static resources externally provided 1.3 Dynamic resources 2. Teaching / Lecturing layer 2.1 Educator / Lecturer layer 2.2 Practitioner layer 2.3 Peer layer 3. Learning layer 3.1 Pedagogical layer 3.2 Assignment & Practice layer 3.3 Studying (silent) layer 3.4 Motivational layer 4. Assessment layer 5. Social layer 6. Technological layer 6. 1 Internal technological layer 6. 2 External technological layer 7. Economic layer 7.1 Financial economic layer 8. SER layer See WP2 draft document for details!!! 20
    • OpenSE Organizational Framework » The concept of Learning Projects, Directories & SVN type Systems 21
    • The concept of Learning Projects, Directories & SVN type Systems » Learning Projects ● The projects have to be small and must be easily to fulfil within the given time and participants should be able to complete the projects with a certain degree of study and scaffolding from the educational material. ● Every project should also have a strict deadline. ● Establish a 'release early' culture and provide rewards for early releases and frequent updates. ● Explain participants at the beginning that they will be expected to showcase and present their project and to make all outcomes available (e.g. within the learning project directory). 22
    • The concept of Learning Projects, Directories & SVN type Systems » What students want – lessons learnt @Aristotle's ISE course (1/3): (1) Roadmap for each project type ● Guide through each step of the project and possible solutions for common problems (2) OSS project list of previous years students ● List with projects that previous years students have worked with and comments about the way the community faced them (3) “Marketplace” ● A place where OSS projects can ask for collaboration with students (4) RSS Feeds ● Instant update of other students activity/ OSS project looking for contributor 23
    • The concept of Learning Projects, Directories & SVN type Systems » What students want – lessons learnt @Aristotle's ISE course (2/3): (5) OSS project members as mentors of students ● Space where students will be able to find names of OSS developers that are willing to guide the students through the project (6) OSS project environment simulation ● Environment where the student will be able to experiment on how OSS projects are organized before getting involved in a real open source project (7) Learning clubs creation ● Students can create groups in order to exchange opinions about their project ● Gathering of students with same project interests ● Avoid isolation of student 24
    • The concept of Learning Projects, Directories & SVN type Systems » What students want – lessons learnt @Aristotle's ISE course (3/3): (8) SVN-like repository for students' activities ● Students will be able to report gradually their “achievements” ● Automatic report extraction of their project 25
    • The concept of Learning Projects, Directories & SVN type Systems » What WE want for the students and lessons learnt @Aristotle's ISE course ● We want basically the same than the students suggested ● The overall purpose and concept of the space and how it shall be used needs to be better explained to the students ● Provision of sample learning projects that allow students to easily understand of what they are expected to do. ● Include MANDATORY elements - the submission of concrete outcomes, such as work on assignments and projects, should be a mandatory element of their overall evaluation, with clearly outlined and defined dates on what they are expected to 'deliver'. 26
    • The concept of Learning Projects, Directories & SVN type Systems » So how should the openSE space ultimately look like? ● Perhaps a bit like Sourceforge?!? ● With better integration of underlying courses?!? ● Else?!? 27
    • The concept of Learning Projects, Directories & SVN type Systems » The Sourceforge case (1/3) 28
    • The concept of Learning Projects, Directories & SVN type Systems » The Sourceforge case (1/3) 29
    • The concept of Learning Projects, Directories & SVN type Systems » The Sourceforge case (1/3) 30
    • thanks!!! 31