Theo van Doesburg : an art history and analysis

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Theo van Doesburg : an art history and analysis

  1. 1. Theo Van Doesberg Born August 30, 1883 in Utrecht, Netherlands Painter. Writer. Designer. Art critic. Influenced industrial design, typography, architecture, literature and music. Died March 7, 1931 in Davos, Switzerland Photographed in Cafe L’Aubette. 1927.
  2. 2. c. 1915 With the mobilization of Dutch forces, he was sent to Tillburg near the Belgium front in WWI.
  3. 3. c. 1915 With the mobilization of Dutch forces, he was sent to Tillburg near the Belgium front in WWI.
  4. 4. c. 1915 With the mobilization of Dutch forces, he was sent to Tillburg near the Belgium front in WWI.
  5. 5. c. 1915 With the mobilization of Dutch forces, he was sent to Tillburg near the Belgium front in WWI.
  6. 6. c. 1915 With the mobilization of Dutch forces, he was sent to Tillburg near the Belgium front in WWI.
  7. 7. c. 1915 With the mobilization of Dutch forces, he was sent to Tillburg near the Belgium front in WWI.
  8. 8. Piet Mondrian. Composition ii in red, blue and yellow. 1930.
  9. 9. Piet Mondrian. Composition ii in red, blue and yellow. 1930. Theo van Doesburg. Counter composition xiv. 1925.
  10. 10. 1917-1931 van Doesburg published and edited De Stijl magazine.
  11. 11. De Stijl A collectivist, Dutch art movement that influenced art internationally through the 1920s. Committed to a unity of the arts, it appealed to fine artists, designers and architects because it sought an objective abstraction through primary color schemes and geometric shapes. The movement also had utopian ideals of unity and universal visual language, likely a response to beginning of WWI and a reflection of Western European neutrality. De stijl postcard. 1920.
  12. 12. De Stijl A collectivist, Dutch art movement that influenced art internationally through the 1920s. Committed to a unity of the arts, it appealed to fine artists, designers and architects because it sought an objective abstraction through primary color schemes and geometric shapes. The movement also had utopian ideals of unity and universal visual language, likely a response to beginning of WWI and a reflection of Western European neutrality.
  13. 13. De Stijl A collectivist, Dutch art movement that influenced art internationally through the 1920s. Committed to a unity of the arts, it appealed to fine artists, designers and architects because it sought an objective abstraction through primary color schemes and geometric shapes. The movement also had utopian ideals of unity and universal visual language, likely a response to beginning of WWI and a reflection of Western European neutrality. De stijl journal cover. 1917.
  14. 14. De Stijl A collectivist, Dutch art movement that influenced art internationally through the 1920s. Committed to a unity of the arts, it appealed to fine artists, designers and architects because it sought an objective abstraction through primary color schemes and geometric shapes. The movement also had utopian ideals of unity and universal visual language, likely a response to beginning of WWI and a reflection of Western European neutrality.
  15. 15. The Cow.
 c. 1916.
  16. 16. Constructivism Constructivism grew from a blend of Cubism and Futurism mixed together with the revolutionary political climate in Russia before WWI and the communist takeover. Borrowed collage and turned it into bas-relif, then free standing sculpture and architectural constructions. Archipenko. Medrano II. 1913.
  17. 17. Constructivism Constructivism grew from a blend of Cubism and Futurism mixed together with the revolutionary political climate in Russia before WWI and the communist takeover. Borrowed collage and turned it into bas-relif, then free standing sculpture and architectural constructions.
  18. 18. Constructivism Constructivism grew from a blend of Cubism and Futurism mixed together with the revolutionary political climate in Russia before WWI and the communist takeover. Borrowed collage and turned it into bas-relif, then free standing sculpture and architectural constructions. van Doesburg. Woman dancing, 1 and 2. 1916.
  19. 19. Constructivism Constructivism grew from a blend of Cubism and Futurism mixed together with the revolutionary political climate in Russia before WWI and the communist takeover. Borrowed collage and turned it into bas-relif, then free standing sculpture and architectural constructions.
  20. 20. Constructivism Constructivism grew from a blend of Cubism and Futurism mixed together with the revolutionary political climate in Russia before WWI and the communist takeover. Borrowed collage and turned it into bas-relif, then free standing sculpture and architectural constructions. van Doesburg. The scarecrow page. 1925.
  21. 21. Constructivism Constructivism grew from a blend of Cubism and Futurism mixed together with the revolutionary political climate in Russia before WWI and the communist takeover. Borrowed collage and turned it into bas-relif, then free standing sculpture and architectural constructions.
  22. 22. Constructivism Constructivism grew from a blend of Cubism and Futurism mixed together with the revolutionary political climate in Russia before WWI and the communist takeover. Borrowed collage and turned it into bas-relif, then free standing sculpture and architectural constructions. van Doesburg. Still life. 1916.
  23. 23. Constructivism Constructivism grew from a blend of Cubism and Futurism mixed together with the revolutionary political climate in Russia before WWI and the communist takeover. Borrowed collage and turned it into bas-relif, then free standing sculpture and architectural constructions.
  24. 24. Constructivism Constructivism grew from a blend of Cubism and Futurism mixed together with the revolutionary political climate in Russia before WWI and the communist takeover. Borrowed collage and turned it into bas-relif, then free standing sculpture and architectural constructions. van Doesburg. Card Players. 1916.
  25. 25. clockwise from top left:
 
 Theo van Doesburg. Composition XII. 1918.
 
 
 
Piet Mondrian. Pier and Ocean. 1915.
 
 Theo van Doesburg. typeface. 1919.
  26. 26. clockwise from top left:
 
 Theo van Doesburg. Composition XII. 1918.
 
 
 
 Theo van Doesburg. typeface. 1919.
  27. 27. Gerrit Rietveld. Child’s chair. 1920. clockwise from top left:
 
 Theo van Doesburg. Composition XII. 1918.
 
 
 
 Theo van Doesburg. typeface. 1919.
  28. 28. Gerrit Rietveld. Child’s chair. 1920. clockwise from top left:
 
 Theo van Doesburg. Composition XII. 1918.
 
 
 
 Theo van Doesburg. typeface. 1919.
  29. 29. Gerrit Rietveld. Child’s chair. 1920. 
 
 
 Theo van Doesburg. typeface. 1919.
  30. 30. Theo van Doesburg. Card Players. 1917. Gerrit Rietveld. Child’s chair. 1920. 
 
 
 Theo van Doesburg. typeface. 1919.
  31. 31. Clockwise from top, by Gerrit Rietveld:
 
 Red Blue Chair. 1923. 
 Schroder House, exterior, interior. 1920.
  32. 32. Clockwise from top, by Gerrit Rietveld:
 Red Blue Chair. 1923.
  33. 33. Clockwise from top, by Gerrit Rietveld:
 Red Blue Chair. 1923. Theo van Doesburg. Simultaneous Countercomposition. 1929.
  34. 34. clockwise from top: Cafe L’Aubette plans. Gouache. 
 c 1928 Cafe L’Aubette
 architectural model
 c. 1992 Cafe L’Aubette
 Cinema, dance hall. 
 c. 1928.
  35. 35. DADA Nihilistic precursor of surrealism c. 1915-1923 that began in Zurich in response to WWI. Design prior to DADA was almost exclusively used to promote commercial interests and in 1914, political propaganda. ANTI-EVERYTHING What is DADA cover. 1923.
  36. 36. DADA Nihilistic precursor of surrealism c. 1915-1923 that began in Zurich in response to WWI. Design prior to DADA was almost exclusively used to promote commercial interests and in 1914, political propaganda. ANTI-EVERYTHING
  37. 37. DADA Nihilistic precursor of surrealism c. 1915-1923 that began in Zurich in response to WWI. Design prior to DADA was almost exclusively used to promote commercial interests and in 1914, political propaganda. ANTI-EVERYTHING DADA event poster with Kurt Schwitters. 1922.
  38. 38. DADA Nihilistic precursor of surrealism c. 1915-1923 that began in Zurich in response to WWI. Design prior to DADA was almost exclusively used to promote commercial interests and in 1914, political propaganda. ANTI-EVERYTHING
  39. 39. DADA Nihilistic precursor of surrealism c. 1915-1923 that began in Zurich in response to WWI. Design prior to DADA was almost exclusively used to promote commercial interests and in 1914, political propaganda. ANTI-EVERYTHING DADA event poster with Kurt Schwitters. 1922.
  40. 40. DADA Nihilistic precursor of surrealism c. 1915-1923 that began in Zurich in response to WWI. Design prior to DADA was almost exclusively used to promote commercial interests and in 1914, political propaganda. ANTI-EVERYTHING
  41. 41. DADA Nihilistic precursor of surrealism c. 1915-1923 that began in Zurich in response to WWI. Design prior to DADA was almost exclusively used to promote commercial interests and in 1914, political propaganda. ANTI-EVERYTHING Mechano cover. 1923.
  42. 42. 1921 - 1923 van Doesburg lived in Weimar, Germany and used his home to promote de stijl to staff and students of bauhaus. Bauhaus had an overriding commitment to architecture that rejected any division between decorative and constructional techniques; as such it was closely related to de stijl and constructivism, but as far away from DADA as one can get.
  43. 43. 1922 van Doesburg convened an international conference of constructivists and DADAists in Weimar.
  44. 44. 1930 published “A Manifesto of Art Concret”

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