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Idea Idea Presentation Transcript

  • WHAT NO CHILD LEFT BEHIND Act of 2001IS Is a United States Act of Congress that is a reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary N Education Act, which included Title I, the government’s flagship aid program for disadvantaged students. C Supports standards based on the premise that setting high standards and establishing measurable goals can improve individual outcomes in education. L Expanded the federal role in public education through annual testing, annual academic progress, report cards, teacher qualifications, and B funding changes. The bill passed in the U.S Congress with bipartisan support.
  • LEGISLATIVE HISTORYThe Legislation was proposed byPresident George W. Bush on January23, 2001.
  • PROVISIONS OF THE ACT No Child Left Behind is requires all public schools receiving federal funding to administer a state-wide standardized test annually to all students. AYP Adequate Yearly Progress (e.g. each year, its fifth graders must do better on standardized tests than the previous year’s fifth graders).
  • IF THE SCHOOL’S RESULTS REPEATEDLY POOR,THEN STEPS ARE TAKEN TO IMPROVE THE SCHOOL. Schools that miss AYP for a second consecutive year are publicly labelled as being “in need of improvement” and are required to develop a two-year improvement plan for the subject that the school is not teaching well. Missing AYP in the third year forces the school to offer free tutoring and other supplemental education services to struggling students. If a school misses its AYP target for a fourth consecutive year, the school is labelled as requiring “corrective action,” which might involve wholesale replacement of staff, introduction of a new curriculum, or extending the amount of time students spend in class. A fifth year of failure results in planning to restructure the entire school; the plan is implemented if the school fails to hit its AYP targets for the sixth year in a row.
  • STATES MUST CREATE AYP OBJECTIVES CONSISTENTWITH THE FOLLOWING REQUIREMENTS OF THE LAW:1. STATES MUST DEVELOP AYP STATE-WIDE MEASURABLEOBJECTIVES FOR IMPROVED ACHIEVEMENT BY ALLSTUDENTS AND FOR SPECIFIC GROUPS:- ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED STUDENTS-STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES AND-STUDENTS WITH LIMITED ENGLISH PROFICIENCY2. THE OBJECTIVES MUST BE SET WITH THE GOAL OF HAVINGALL STUDENTS AT THE PROFICIENT LEVEL OR ABOVE WITHIN12 YEARS.3. AYP MUST BE BASED PRIMARILY ON STATEASSESSMENTS, BUT ALSO INCLUDE ONE ADDITIONALACADEMIC INDICATOR.
  • 4. The AYP must be assessed at the school level.5. School AYP results must be reported separately for each group s of students identified above so that it can be determined whether each student group met the AYP objective.6. At least 95% of each group must participate in state assessments.7. States may aggregate up to 3 years of data in making AYP determinations.
  • EFFECTS ON SCHOOLS, TEACHERS, AND SCHOOLDISTRICTSINCREASED ACCOUNTABILITY( for schools and teachers)-one of the strong positive points of the bill., In addition to and in support of the above points proponents claim that NO CHILD LEFT BEHIND: Links state academic content standards with students outcomes. Measures students performance: a student’s progress in reading and math must be measured annually in grades 3 through 8 and at least once during high school via standardized tests. Provides information for parents by requiring states and school districts to give parents detailed report cards on schools and districts explaining the school’s AYP performance. Establishes the foundation for schools and school districts to significantly enhance parental involvement and improved administration through the use of the assessment data to drive decisions on instruction, curriculum and business practices.
  • SCHOOL CHOICE Gives options to students enrolled in schools failing to meet AYP. Gives school districts the opportunity to demonstrate proficiency, even for subgroups that do not meet State Minimum Achievement standards, through a process called “SAFE HARBOR”, a precursor to growth-based or value –added assessments.
  • Individuals with Disabilities Education Act
  • is a United States federal law that governs howstates and public agencies provide earlyintervention, special education, and relatedservices to children with disabilities.
  • DISABILITIES COVERED UNDERIDEA •Autism •Deafness •Deaf-blindness •Emotional Disturbance •Hearing Impairments •Mental Retardation •Other Health Problems •Orthopedic Impairment •Multiple Disabilities •Specific Learning Disorders •Speech/Language Impairments •Traumatic Brain Injury •Visual Impairment
  • SIX PRINCIPLES 1. Zero Reject - schools must educate all children with disabilities. -rule against excluding any student, cannot exclude no matter how severe the disability. 2. Nondiscriminatory Identification and evaluation
  •  -schools must used non-biased, multifactored methods of evaluation to determine whether a child has a disability and, if, so, whether special education needed. 3. Free, Appropriate Public Education (FAPE) - All children with disabilities, regardless of the type or severity of their disability, shall receive a free, appropriate public education.
  •  4. Least Restrictive Environment (LRE) - mandates that students with disabilities be educated with children without disabilities to the maximum extent appropriate and that students with disabilities be removed to separate classes or schools only when the nature or severity of their disabilities is such that they cannot receive an appropriate education in a general education classroom with supplementary aids and services.
  • 5. Due Process Safeguards- Procedural safeguards are a set of activities whose purpose is to ensure that:>The rights of children with disabilities and their parents are protected.> All information needed to make decisions about the provision of a free appropriate public education to the student is provided to parents of children with disabilities and to the student when appropriate.> Procedures (mediation and due process) are in place to resolve disagreements between parties.
  • 6. Parent and Participation and shared decision making-This principle reinforces the belief that the education of children with disabilities is made more effective by strengthening the role of parents in the special education process. IDEA requires that parents (and students, as appropriate) participate in each step of the special education process. Students must be invited to participate in IEP meetings where transition services are to be discussed. Parent involvement includes:
  • > Equal partnership in the decision-making process.>The right to receive notice.>The right to give consent for certain activities such as evaluations, changes in placement; and release of information to others.>The right to participate in all meetings concerning their childs special education.
  • NCLBReporters: Alfornon, Angelie A. Laganson, Diana Grace Ed-PSE 104 Tth 5:30-7:00pm Ms. April Marie Campo Teacher