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The Herculean Conversion of a
Small Branch
ILF Annual Conference
October 22, 2013
Indianapolis, IN
Andrea Kappler, Catalog...
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Large public library in Evansville (SW IN)
Central Library, 7 branches, 1 bookmobile
Population served (2...
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East Branch, Stringtown Branch, West Branch
Hours/Staffing:
 Closed 2 days/week
 Minimal staffing

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Square footag...
2012 Holdings by Branch
*East

Stringtown

*West

Books/Magazines: 15,765

Books/Magazines: 17,681

Books/Magazines: 24,48...
2012 Circulation by Branch
*East

Stringtown

*West

Books/Magazines: 17,108

Books/Magazines: 28,312

Books/Magazines: 33...
Pilot project:
 Smallest collection
 Lowest annual circulation
 Declining circulation statistics
 Lower educational/ec...
One
bite
at
a
time!
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Lots of research
Defined scope of project
Created Wiki page
Notified internal and external players
Conver...
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“Taxonomy” = classification of things or
concepts
Reference staff, branch staff, LIS intern,
cataloger(s)
G...
Many, many of them!
 Fast-track directive
 Thinking outside the box
 BISAC’s weaknesses and quirks
 Executive vs. grou...
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Spine label limitations
Stickers
Assigning BISAC call numbers
Re-labeling existing books
Moving shelves
Dev...
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Vacations, conferences, other projects, crises
Retirements, loss of intern
ILS migration
Training CD staff,...
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Existing stock:
 Shelf ready vendor
 Audiobooks/Playaways

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Must include:
 Prefixes- (R, J, YA, foreign language s...
CAREERS
COLLEGE
PORTABLE

TRAVEL
FL
FLORIDA
2012

BIO
ANTONIA
JORDAN

ART
GENERAL
AUDUBON
BLAUGRUN

TRUCRIME
MURDER
MILLER...
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Spreadsheet-based (1 for adult; 1 for juvenile)
39 unique top-level categories (adult)
Countries/Peoples spread...
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All titles & copies in collection
Missing, billed, lost & paid
Tabs
Sort-able
Countable
Dewey # and BISAC...
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Dewey/BISAC spreadsheet
Done at East Branch
Supplies & equipment
TSD staff time
Case-by-case decisions
Adult NF:
 One month (August 2012)
 Two catalogers
 Part-time (20-25 hrs/week)
 2,300+ adult NF books converted
 125 ...
Juvenile NF:
 Multiple months (Oct. 2012, Mar. 2013, July
2013)
 Two catalogers, then one cataloger
 Part-time (15-20 h...
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Dewey call # in bibliographic record
BISAC call # in item record(s)
BISAC headings in most bibliographic records
...
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Project 1: Create Adult BISAC taxonomy and spine
labeling scheme
 Re-label adult NF books, audiobooks, and Playaways

...
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Non-cataloger appreciation for classification?
Eliminated some location codes
Eliminated low-use collecti...
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Sort of, but not really
Circulation
 By BISAC category
 Converted vs. New

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Year-to-Year
Withdrawals
East’s p...
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BISAC categories with highest circulation:
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COOKING
BIO
LEISURE
HEALTH
HISTORY
RELIGION
TESTS
MATH

8%
...
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Books (after 6 mos. & 1 yr.)
 Converted
▪ No circ: 78%; 63%
▪ 1-4 circs each: 20%; 24%
▪ 5+ circs each: 5 books; 9 boo...
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CD Audiobooks and Playaways (after 6 mos.)
 Converted
▪ 93% had no circ
▪ 7% had 1+ circ
 New
▪ 100% had no circ
Circulation of East’s BISAC
Books & Magazines at East
Aug 2011- Aug 2012 Sept 2012 – Sept 2013 % Change
# of Checkouts

# ...
Books withdrawn (year-end totals):
 2009: 3,385
 2010: 5,111
 2011:
3,234
 2012: 2,319
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3,100+ patrons
49% in zip code 47713
65% adult, 8% juvenile, 2% YA
14% are 43-52 years old
11% are 23-27 or 2...
Manual Blocks
*East

Stringtown

*West

Credit Bureau: 21%

Credit Bureau: 14%

Credit Bureau: 12%

Amount owed: $78,027.5...
Annual Compilations of Quarterly
In-house Usage Stats
*East

Stringtown

*West

2010: 6,487

2010: 6,955

2010: 8,671

201...
Maintenance issues:
 Changing BISAC headings
 Call numbers in taxonomy
 Spine labels
 Bibliographic records

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No a...
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Avoid fads
Don’t re-invent the wheel
Know your ILS
Weed heavily
Goals and timeline
Committee/Team
Schedul...
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Listen!
Communicate/Discuss
Document decisions
Credit/Praise
Coordinate
Dark chocolate
Don’t look back!
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Strength in numbers
Organization is crucial
Pick your battles
Delegate!
Don’t judge a book by its cover (...
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Local history collection
Other neighborhood branches?
“Start by doing what’s necessary;
then do what’s possible;
and suddenly you are doing the
impossible”
– St. Francis of Ass...
Contact information:
Andrea Kappler
Cataloging Manager
Evansville Vanderburgh Public Library
andreak@evpl.org
812-428-8398
Transforming from Dewey to BISAC: The Herculean Conversion of a Small Branch
Transforming from Dewey to BISAC: The Herculean Conversion of a Small Branch
Transforming from Dewey to BISAC: The Herculean Conversion of a Small Branch
Transforming from Dewey to BISAC: The Herculean Conversion of a Small Branch
Transforming from Dewey to BISAC: The Herculean Conversion of a Small Branch
Transforming from Dewey to BISAC: The Herculean Conversion of a Small Branch
Transforming from Dewey to BISAC: The Herculean Conversion of a Small Branch
Transforming from Dewey to BISAC: The Herculean Conversion of a Small Branch
Transforming from Dewey to BISAC: The Herculean Conversion of a Small Branch
Transforming from Dewey to BISAC: The Herculean Conversion of a Small Branch
Transforming from Dewey to BISAC: The Herculean Conversion of a Small Branch
Transforming from Dewey to BISAC: The Herculean Conversion of a Small Branch
Transforming from Dewey to BISAC: The Herculean Conversion of a Small Branch
Transforming from Dewey to BISAC: The Herculean Conversion of a Small Branch
Transforming from Dewey to BISAC: The Herculean Conversion of a Small Branch
Transforming from Dewey to BISAC: The Herculean Conversion of a Small Branch
Transforming from Dewey to BISAC: The Herculean Conversion of a Small Branch
Transforming from Dewey to BISAC: The Herculean Conversion of a Small Branch
Transforming from Dewey to BISAC: The Herculean Conversion of a Small Branch
Transforming from Dewey to BISAC: The Herculean Conversion of a Small Branch
Transforming from Dewey to BISAC: The Herculean Conversion of a Small Branch
Transforming from Dewey to BISAC: The Herculean Conversion of a Small Branch
Transforming from Dewey to BISAC: The Herculean Conversion of a Small Branch
Transforming from Dewey to BISAC: The Herculean Conversion of a Small Branch
Transforming from Dewey to BISAC: The Herculean Conversion of a Small Branch
Transforming from Dewey to BISAC: The Herculean Conversion of a Small Branch
Transforming from Dewey to BISAC: The Herculean Conversion of a Small Branch
Transforming from Dewey to BISAC: The Herculean Conversion of a Small Branch
Transforming from Dewey to BISAC: The Herculean Conversion of a Small Branch
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Transforming from Dewey to BISAC: The Herculean Conversion of a Small Branch

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Presentation at the 2013 ILF Annual Conference, October 22, 2013, Indianapolis, IN. I discussed why the Evansville Vanderburgh Public Library chose to convert the nonfiction books at our smallest branch from Dewey to BISAC, how we did it, and whether or not it increased circulation at that branch.

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  • This picture is from our website. The large tree on the left and the large shrubs on either side of the door are gone. They’ve been replaced with smaller plants and it’s easier to see the building.
  • Why we chose BISAC for East NF:Smallest branch in terms of circulationDeclining circulation stats Inner city neighborhood; lower educational/economic backgroundWe’ve already done a lot to keep the branch open (reduced hours, re-aligned staff, ramp up programming, reevaluated collection development policies and eliminated underused collections)Impact of:Local public schools eliminated media specialist positions in k-8 schools 8 years ago; staffed by media “aides” now. Who is teaching DDC to students?Wanted to try having a browsing collection (Power Shelving)
  • This was a project of ginormous size! How would we ever accomplish it?
  • One bite at a time!
  • BISAC Prep:I researched what other libraries had done (Maricopa Co., Rangeview Library District, Topeka and Shawnee County PL, etc.). I noticed none of them were Indiana libraries!Contacted them w/questionsDefined the scope of the project (adult and juvenileNF & magazines; was not needed for fiction, music CDs, videos- those collections already had non-Dewey call numbers)Created a Wiki page on ourstaff Intranet to gather info & communicate w/individuals involved in the projectGave Marketing & Communications Dept. the heads-upGave Maintenance Dept. the heads-upGave IT Dept. the heads-up (setting up printer for spine labels @ East)Gave B&T the heads-upConverted magazine collection first to topic-based organization (no re-labeling needed, just new signage). This was based on what the Baldwin Public Library, Baldwin, NY had done with their magazine collection.Involved a LIS intern (free labor!). He was intelligent, thoughtful, and motivated, and he gave us wonderful inputCreated a committee (included the LIS intern)Did heavy withdrawals (intern helped with that), but not so heavy that we had little left to convert
  • The BISAC Taxonomy Team:I chose the word “taxonomy” because it meant "a classification of things or concepts" (from Wikipedia)I included reference staff, branch staff, & the LIS internI outlined the goals of the committee & gave them a timeline for this projectI choose 4 other libraries as our models (Maricopa, Rangeview, Pierce Co., Langley-Adams). We reviewed their work & based our taxonomy on what they had done, yet made changes where we felt it would serve us best (no need to reinvent the wheel!)I broke outthe individualBISAC categories into separate spreadsheets (for both the adult & juvenile committee members)I assigned BISAC categories to committee members- w/deadlines for completionI expected them to edit spreadsheets & post on Intranet (rather than work on paper)We decided to create 2-level category-based call numbers (we needed space on spine labels for prefixes, foreign language symbols, double-cuttered names, vol. info.; we also kept in mind users of the collection & the small size of the collection at East)I created a special Wiki page on our Intranet and we used the discussion area of the Wiki page to post questions and debate call numbers. I also posted our agendas, our documentation, and our timeline there. Our Wiki page allowed us to set up alerts when new discussions were posted, existing discussions had comments, or documents were uploaded/edited. (The Wiki page was easier for me to track progress of the committee without sending them a bunch of emails.)
  • Many, many challenges!The director issued a fast-track directive- she wanted us to be the first library in Indiana to accomplish this!Much thinking outside of the box needed- for both me and the committee members, especially public services staff not used to thinking about classificationBISAC had more weaknesses and quirks than I could have imagined, especially with the children’s booksI had to figure out when it was best to make an executive decision for the group vs. letting group evaluate the evidence and make a binding decision (e.g., 8-character main entry letters)I was very careful to document our decisions, because if I didn’t, we (or later the catalogers or B&T) would ask a question that needed an answer and I didn’t want to try remembering what was said in a committee meetingI worked hard at keeping the group (and myself!) focused on consistency, which was important to rolling this out for existing books, as well as using our taxonomy on new books
  • More challenges…Our spine labels limited us to the number of characters we could use and the number of BISAC category breakdowns we could have (more on this in a later slide).Public libraries love their stickers, so we had to discuss which ones were worth keeping, and which weren’t, because they were eliminated by the BISAC categories (e.g., Careers, Tests, Adult Christmas, Science Project were eliminated).Assigning BISAC call numbers to books on a spreadsheet based on their title is challenging, even if you can look at their BISAC headings in TS3.Re-labeling existing books was lots of manual work to add an item call number, add special prefixes, place the new label over the old one, and cover it with a label protector. Catalogers had to know which books were keeping stickers and which weren’t.Moving the shelves was lots of physical work for our maintenance team, including cleaning the marks off the floor after the move.Developing documentation meant putting all of our decisions into a format that could be understood by catalogers and B&T’s cataloging staff.Coordinating the whole process with B&T involved setting up a separate account for these orders, sending them a test order, checking it and giving them feedback, then going into production. Still a challenge because it requires us to have two bibliographic records when we order: one with all of the branches except East; the other with just East’s BISAC copy. This confuses both our public services staff and B&T from time-to-time.
  • And more challenges…Vacations, conferences, other projects, and the usual day-to-day crises (e.g., ALA Annual Conference, EVSC patron records project, MediaBank problems).Retirements & loss of intern:One cataloger (end of Nov. 2012), Public Services Manager (end of Sep. 2012), my boss (end of May 2012); intern wasn’t able to finish term on juvenile taxonomy committee due to FT job at Best Buy in Nov. 2012.ILS migration: Not a migration of the whole system, but of the staff interface. New staff interface was beset with massive problems that affected mostly the catalogers (and me!)Training: Collection Development staff had a difficult time using our documentation for selection; they’ve since retired and training the replacement staff is planned. Catalogers haven’t had any official training; public services have had none.Marketing/Publicity: I had a little difficulty at first conveying the magnitude of what we had done to the head of Marketing. Although they had done signage and were aware of the move, they thought it was superficial and didn’t understand how “big” it is in the library community to drop Dewey and use BISAC to organize a nonfiction book collection.Tracking/Evaluating circ: This wasn’t as easy to see in Collection HQ as I had thought I would be. It has also been difficult to measure in Sierra without reviewing each item individuallyRepeat performance: Doing it all over again with the juvenile NF!
  • We could not change our spine label stock for a number of reasons:We had to consider what our shelf ready vendor B&T could do when making our spine labels (no fancy colors, fonts, or size). We also had to consider what were using on adult audiobooks & Playaways, as well as any books cataloged in-house.We had to leave room for prefixes and volume/part numbering, as well as the BISAC call numbers and main entry letters.We were limited by spine labels that could accommodate 8 characters across and have up to 7 lines top-to-bottom
  • We developed separate BISAC taxonomies for the adult and juvenile collections.There were 39 unique top-level categories for the adult collection (I haven’t counted them for the juvenile).We had to develop a separate Countries/Peoples spreadsheet for the CULTURE category in the juvenile taxonomy.The CONCEPTS audience cutoff uses the Audience filters in TitleSource 3. We chose to have the first 3 audience levels, including Kindergarten, Age 5-6, go into the CONCEPTS call number. If the audience level was higher than Kindergarten, but the BISAC heading CONCEPTS had been assigned, we decided to ignore it and choose another appropriate BISAC heading as the call number.We created documentation that could be used by both our catalogers and B&T’s catalogers, for the ease of updating it over time
  • 48 BISAC categoriesEach one on a separate tabColumns for BISAC 1 and BISAC 2 levels of descriptionPlaceholder columns for Main Entry and Vol/YrNo placeholder column for ‘R’ (reference) or foreign language symbols (staff understand those are implied)Each of these tabs was broken out into a separate spreadsheet for BISAC taxonomy committee members to work on.A sample of this spreadsheet is available as a hand-out
  • This Master List helped keep all of the BISAC 1 and BISAC 2 call numbers straight for each BISAC category, since it was easy to overlook things when they were broken up into separate tabs on a spreadsheet. Using this also helped with consistency of spelling and the categories themselves.
  • There were 59 juvenile BISAC categories, but so many of them were 1-topic areas that we decided not to put them on separate tabs in the final spreadsheet. Committee members did work on them as separate spreadsheets though.Most would fit into our BISAC 1 and BISAC 2 breakdownSeveral of them have a BISAC 3 instruction with an asterisk and bracketed text highlighted in yellow. Those are topics where we decided we needed to break out to a BISAC 3 level to properly express the topic of the book, like ANIMALS BIRDS PENGUINS. This is one of the areas where BISAC fell short of Dewey, where there are specific classification numbers for things like the different animals, planets, states, countries, and people.A sample of this spreadsheet is available as a handout.
  • Countries around the world and Native American peoples posed special challenges for us for books assigned the BISAC heading People & Places, which we decided to call culture. Many different people and places were represented here and having a 2-level taxonomy presented special challenges when getting to the level of specificity needed to properly place children’s books according to their subject matter. We decided to go to a 3rd level for these books and use this chart, because the heading wasn’t always properly assigned or the people/place covered by the book had alternative names or a conflicting geographic location.A sample of this spreadsheet is available as a handout; one sample each for Countries and People.
  • All titles/copies in collection: I exported from our system all of the data for the adult and juvenile NF collections and then created spreadsheets for each one.Missing, billed, lost & paid: Easy to spot them and not waste time assigning BISAC call numbers to those things, then hunting them downTabs: Helpful for the additional adult NF collections at East, such as reference, tests, careers, etc.Sort-able: Sort by any column of data- Dewey #, BISAC 1 and BISAC 2, etc., to see data on the spreadsheetCountable: Easy to quickly count the number of books to be converted and the number of books in each BISAC category. This was helpful to East Branch staff when re-shelving them and deciding where to place them on the shelves.Dewey # and BISAC #: Easy to see where books were going from and to. Catalogers would be seeing the books shelved by Dewey, so they needed to know that number too.Tested BISAC taxonomy: It really put the BISAC taxonomy to the test to apply it to books on the spreadsheet before actually converting them at the branch. Easy to highlight problem books needing closer review before assigning their BISAC call #.Consistency, errors, making decisions: It really helped me to be consistent with spelling BISAC terms, finding errors, and making decisions about the more challenging titles in their collection.
  • The adult NF Dewey/BISAC spreadsheetColumns: Local Bibliographic record #, BISAC 1, BISAC 2, Dewey Call#, Checkmark for conversion, Title of bookThis was what I used to assign the BISAC taxonomy call numbers to the existing books in the collection for the conversion of both the adult and juvenile NF collections at East Branch.Catalogers printed it off and took it to the branch with them, placing a checkmark next to the title after converting it.A sample of this spreadsheet is available as a handout.
  • Conversion Process:Spreadsheet w/titles, Dewey #s and BISAC call #s for catalogers to use at the branch.Books stayed at East; catalogers went there for conversion. IT set up a dot-matrix printer at one of the staff computers at East.How much TSD staff time spent (20-25 hrs/week for the month of August 2012).Had to make some case-by-case decisions (e.g., A book about the Chickasaw Indians in the juvenile collection w/title main entry and BISAC 2 category lookedconfusing in the computer and on the spine label with the new call number of CULTURE CHICKSAW CHICKASA).How many books converted? Over 2,300 adult and 2,400 juvenile
  • Cataloger Jeanne Bullock at East Branch,re-labeling books from Dewey to BISAC call numbers
  • Converted books ready for re-shelving, after the shelving units were turned.
  • Our juvenile CDaudiobooks and Playaways have never had Dewey numbers assigned to them. This may go back to the days of the cassette/book combinations in hanging bags, which made it impossible to label them with Dewey #s and keep them “shelved” in Dewey order when they were hanging from a bar.
  • We decided to retain the Dewey # in the 092 field of the bibliographic record, even if East Branch had the only copy of a title in the entire system.The BISAC call number was added to East’s item records in field 099, which displays in the public catalog.We added BISAC headings to all of the “problem” records during while assigning BISAC call numbers on the spreadsheets. We didn’t go back and add them to all of the records for the converted books. We’re adding them to all new titles going into East (and so is B&T adding them).We still don’t have BISAC authority records. Marcive is unable to get permission from OCLC and the BISG to create them. Some of them do create conflicts in our catalog, but we’ve left them in the bibliographic records, since they’re correct for BISAC.
  • The location of BISAC headings in a TS3 record. We copy/paste these into our bibliographic records into field 650 _7 with $2 bisacsh
  • The 092 field contains our local Dewey #The 650 _7 fields contain the BISAC headings copied from TS3
  • The staff view of a book with a copy at East BranchThe Dewey # in the 092 field is visible in the top half of the record.The BISAC call number in East’s item record.
  • East’s item record opened to full view. The BISC call number and main entry letters are in the 099 field of their item record.
  • East’s BISC call number displaying next to their location name. The Dewey # is coming from the 092 field of the bibliographic record. East’s BISAC call number is coming from the 099 field of their item record.
  • This is how the room looked before the adult NF shelves were turned to be parallel with the computer table in the front of the picture.
  • Keeping patrons informed and offering assistance.
  • The proposedfloor plan.
  • East Branch staff member Catherine Howard and LIS intern Scott XXXX clearing the shelves so they can be turned.
  • Mike Ruder and maintenance staff unbolting shelving units from the floor and turning them.
  • Mike and Stan moving a shelving unit.
  • Neil mopping the floor and removing marks left behind by the outline of basees of the shelving units.
  • East Branch Manager Beth Heil with the master shelving plan to guide them in re-shelving the books by BISAC category.
  • East Branch staff member Cindy re-shelving converted books.
  • The new shelving array by BISAC category, with open spaces for face-out displays of books.
  • A close-up view of the EDUCATE collection, which shows the foreign language symbol ‘Sp’ on the spine labels, as well as the year on an annual publication.
  • A close-up of the COOKING section, with clip-onshelf label signage made by our Marketing & Communications Dept.
  • A view of the GARDEN category, with space for a front-facing “Power Shelving” display of a book.
  • The new room arrangement after the shelves were re-positioned and converted books re-shelved by BISAC categories.
  • Benefits:Hopefully an appreciation by non-cataloging staff of how difficult it can be to classify books, even when using a word-based classification system we devised ourselves. Maybe even devising the BISAC taxonomy was harder than they might have thought it wasReduced the number of location codes in our ILS for East adult collection (eliminated Tests, Careers, adult Christmas, Science Project)Eliminated little-used Large Type NF collection @ EaTSD staff working in a branch- different perspectives for both them and branch staffIncreased ability to market seasonal books by moving them into more prominent areas towards the front of the NF section. The most popular topics like CRAFTS, LEISURE, are always in the front sections. Right now HOLIDAY books have been moved up front and will remain there until January. Come springtime, they’ll move the GARDENING and NATURE books to the front.Anecdotal reports of East users discovering books they never knew we had, of being impressed we did this for them, have generally liked the switch. A few are disappointed to find out the Dewey numbers aren’t on the books, because they came from a branch, where staff there gave them the Dewey #. They like going to a particular section, like COOKING, and seeing all the books grouped there, then separated by topics like general, healthy, desserts, etc., (although WE knew Dewey did that already!).Increased circulation?? It doesn’t look like it
  • No magical jump in circulation
  • Looking at which BISAC categories had the highest circulation 6 months after the conversion, it appears as though the conversion has boosted circulation of adult nonfiction books at East Branch.
  • The breakdown of circulation comparing it for converted books, CD audiobooks, and Playaways to new materials in each of those collections. The majority of converted materials didn’t circ at all following the conversion, yet a higher percentage of new materials appear to be circulating more than they might otherwise have done.Circulation Data (as of March 2013)Converted books (existing in collection as of 7/27/2012, before their conversion):78% had 0 circ20% had 1+ circs2% undetermined (checked out during conversion)3 books went out more than 5 times eachOldest books seemed not to benefit from relabeling to BISAC Circ for new books (added to collection after 8/27/12):41% had 0 circ59% had 1+ circsSome books have gone out 6, 7 and 8 timesNewest books seem to benefit most from relabeling to BISAC CD Audiobooks & PlayawaysCirc since conversion (existing in collection as of 7/27/12, before their conversion)93% had 0 circ7% had 1+ circ Circ for new items (added after 8/27/12)100% had 0 circ
  • The breakdown of circulation comparing it for converted books, CD audiobooks, and Playaways to new materials in each of those collections. The majority of converted materials didn’t circ at all following the conversion, yet a higher percentage of new materials appear to be circulating more than they might otherwise have done.Circulation Data (as of March 2013)Converted books (existing in collection as of 7/27/2012, before their conversion):78% had 0 circ20% had 1+ circs2% undetermined (checked out during conversion)3 books went out more than 5 times eachOldest books seemed not to benefit from relabeling to BISAC Circ for new books (added to collection after 8/27/12):41% had 0 circ59% had 1+ circsSome books have gone out 6, 7 and 8 timesNewest books seem to benefit most from relabeling to BISAC CD Audiobooks & PlayawaysCirc since conversion (existing in collection as of 7/27/12, before their conversion)93% had 0 circ7% had 1+ circ Circ for new items (added after 8/27/12)100% had 0 circ
  • A year-to-year comparison of circulation of East’s BISAC books and magazines at East (not sent for circulation elsewhere, nor sent to East for hold pick-up) shows an average decline of -48% across these categories.
  • East didn’t withdraw too many books in preparation for the BISAC conversion. They had done their heaviest withdrawals from 2009-2011 and withdrew the fewest books in 2012.
  • For one week every quarter, public services staff count materials left on tables, carts, etc., record usage in the item records of those materials, and IT staff tally those figures from our statistical module. The result is multiplied by 13 weeks to get an estimate of in-house use by branch for that quarter. Figures from 2013 are estimates, due to bugs in the new ILS staff interface and staff oversight in remembering to count them the most recent quarter.
  • Did we put lipstick on a pig?
  • Maintenance issues:Like LCSH and Sears, BISAC headings will change as new topics emerge in the book publishing industry.This affects call numbers in the taxonomy, spine labels, and headings in bibliographic records.No authority records to handle cross-references or new terms that appear.Difficult to know when the BISG has changed headings. Need to update our documentation, communicate changes to our catalogers and B&T’s catalogers, and update bibliographic records.
  • Don’t do this just because other libraries are doing it! Look at what other libraries have done and pattern your BISAC call numbers on the backs of their work, yet creatign customization where you need it.Know your ILS and how it indexes and displays call numbers in the 092 and 099 fields.Weed heavily, but not so heavily that you decimate the collection you’re planning to convert to BISAC.Decide on goals of the project and determine a reasonable timeline for completing it.Select your committee/team members and include staff from public services areas, especially the one targeted for conversion to BISAC.Schedule as many meetings in advance as you can, preferably while you’re at a meeting. Use technology and get it into everyone’s electronic calendars. No forward movement if you can’t even plan meetings for face-to-face discussions.Don’t be afraid to delegate to others, even if they’re not on the committee. This doesn’t mean not doing the work assigned to you, but asking for help when needed, especially when trying to meet deadlines. Look for staff with particular strengths who are interested in helping, whether or not they’re on the committee.
  • Listen to all committee members and really hear what they’re saying. Remember, you’ve asked them to be on the committee because you wanted their input- make sure you’re open to hearing it, even if it’s not what you expected to hear nor want to hear.Communicate regularly with committee members between meetings, to keep the dialog/discussion going. Try to avoid email if possible, since not everyone remembers to hit the ‘Reply All’ button when replying to a group email topic. Communicate with the public your intentions with this project.Document all decisions as soon as they’re made, whether they’re made via online discussions or in a face-to-face meeting. You won’t remember every word of every conversation during a meeting. Share documented decisions with the committee ASAP, while memories are fresh, in case it needs clarification or revision.Give credit where credit is due! Thank all committee members and any non-committee members who’ve taken time from their regular duties to serve on this committee or do side projects related to it.Coordinate with other areas that may be involved during the process, such as marketing, public services staff not on the committee, etc.Eat lots of dark chocolate- or whatever sooths and calms you, but is legal and within the guidelines of your personnel handbook.Don’t look back! It’s a huge project, but with teamwork, organization, and determination, you can do it!
  • What I learned:There is strength in numbersOrganization is crucialDelegate!Don't judge a book by its cover (or its title on a spreadsheet)Ignorance is bliss (e.g., too much research just opens Pandora's box)Definition of ASSUME- i.e., The obvious isn't always so obviousPerfection isn't possible; Sanity is desirableThere's another collection to convert to BISAC
  • We’ve created a BISAC categorization system for our local history collection in our Indiana Room. We’re in the process of working through a similar Dewey/BISAC spreadsheet for the books in that collection. I’m not sure if we’ll roll this out to our other two neighborhood branches just yet, although I had assumed we would do this once we were finished with East’s conversion. The low circulation statistics at East make it a tough sell to the library’s administration and library board at this time.
  • Transcript of "Transforming from Dewey to BISAC: The Herculean Conversion of a Small Branch"

    1. 1. The Herculean Conversion of a Small Branch ILF Annual Conference October 22, 2013 Indianapolis, IN Andrea Kappler, Cataloging Manager Evansville Vanderburgh Public Library
    2. 2.         Large public library in Evansville (SW IN) Central Library, 7 branches, 1 bookmobile Population served (2010 Census): 179,703 2012 total registered borrowers: 114,552 2012 total operating fund: $11.8 million 2012 total physical holdings: 806,922 2011 visits: 1.8 million 2011 circulation: 3.1 million (2012 was 2.6 M)
    3. 3.   East Branch, Stringtown Branch, West Branch Hours/Staffing:  Closed 2 days/week  Minimal staffing  Square footage:  6,902 sq. ft. (East & West)  4,428 sq. ft. (Stringtown)  East & West:  Carnegie library buildings (100 yrs old)  Located in small parks
    4. 4. 2012 Holdings by Branch *East Stringtown *West Books/Magazines: 15,765 Books/Magazines: 17,681 Books/Magazines: 24,485 Music CDs/Audiobooks: 2,944 Music CDs/Audiobooks: 2,884 Music CDs/Audiobooks: 3,583 DVDs: 4,448 DVDs: 4,484 DVDs: 4,439 Maps/Other: 0 Maps/Other: 88 Maps/Other: 55 Total items: 23,157 Total items: 25,137 Total items: 32,562
    5. 5. 2012 Circulation by Branch *East Stringtown *West Books/Magazines: 17,108 Books/Magazines: 28,312 Books/Magazines: 33,216 Music CDs/Audiobooks: 7,558 Music CDs/Audiobooks: 7,793 Music CDs/Audiobooks: 8,418 DVDs: 32,366 DVDs: 47,008 DVDs: 44,277 Maps/Other: 1 Maps/Other: 0 Maps/Other: 0 Total items: 57,033 Total items: 83,113 Total items: 84,816
    6. 6. Pilot project:  Smallest collection  Lowest annual circulation  Declining circulation statistics  Lower educational/economic background  Keep branch open Impact of:  Media specialists only in high schools  Power shelving
    7. 7. One bite at a time!
    8. 8.         Lots of research Defined scope of project Created Wiki page Notified internal and external players Converted magazines first Found an intern Formed a committee Withdrew books
    9. 9.        “Taxonomy” = classification of things or concepts Reference staff, branch staff, LIS intern, cataloger(s) Goals and timeline 4 taxonomy models Assignments with deadlines Created 2-level taxonomy (K.I.S.S.) Wiki for communication and documentation
    10. 10. Many, many of them!  Fast-track directive  Thinking outside the box  BISAC’s weaknesses and quirks  Executive vs. group decisions  Documenting decisions  Consistency
    11. 11.        Spine label limitations Stickers Assigning BISAC call numbers Re-labeling existing books Moving shelves Developing documentation Coordination with B&T
    12. 12.        Vacations, conferences, other projects, crises Retirements, loss of intern ILS migration Training CD staff, catalogers, public services Marketing/Publicity Tracking /Evaluating circulation Repeat performance with juvenile NF
    13. 13.  Existing stock:  Shelf ready vendor  Audiobooks/Playaways  Must include:  Prefixes- (R, J, YA, foreign language symbols)  Volume/part numbering  Limitations:  8 characters wide  7 lines top-to-bottom
    14. 14. CAREERS COLLEGE PORTABLE TRAVEL FL FLORIDA 2012 BIO ANTONIA JORDAN ART GENERAL AUDUBON BLAUGRUN TRUCRIME MURDER MILLER R FACTS GENERAL GUINNESS 2012 Sp EDUCATE FORLANG NAVARRO ESL EDUCATE FORLANG GALVIN CD BIO ANGELOU ANGELOU Playaway BIO ANGELOU ANGELOU
    15. 15.      Spreadsheet-based (1 for adult; 1 for juvenile) 39 unique top-level categories (adult) Countries/Peoples spreadsheet (juvenile) CONCEPTS audience cutoff (juvenile) Documentation (staff & B&T)
    16. 16.         All titles & copies in collection Missing, billed, lost & paid Tabs Sort-able Countable Dewey # and BISAC # Tested BISAC taxonomy Consistency, errors, making decisions
    17. 17.      Dewey/BISAC spreadsheet Done at East Branch Supplies & equipment TSD staff time Case-by-case decisions
    18. 18. Adult NF:  One month (August 2012)  Two catalogers  Part-time (20-25 hrs/week)  2,300+ adult NF books converted  125 adult NF audio CDs  22 adult NF Playaways
    19. 19. Juvenile NF:  Multiple months (Oct. 2012, Mar. 2013, July 2013)  Two catalogers, then one cataloger  Part-time (15-20 hrs/week)  2,400+ juvenile NF books converted  No audiobooks or Playaways converted  5,000 spine labels used (adult + juvenile)
    20. 20.     Dewey call # in bibliographic record BISAC call # in item record(s) BISAC headings in most bibliographic records No BISAC authority records
    21. 21.  Project 1: Create Adult BISAC taxonomy and spine labeling scheme  Re-label adult NF books, audiobooks, and Playaways  Project 2: Re-position adult NF shelving units at East Branch  Re-shelve converted books, audiobooks, and Playaways  Label shelves  Project 3: Create Juvenile BISAC taxonomy and spine labeling scheme  Re-label juvenile NF books & label the shelves  No shelf re-positioning done
    22. 22.         Non-cataloger appreciation for classification? Eliminated some location codes Eliminated low-use collection Cleaned up collections TSD staff worked at East Shelving flexibility/Marketing Patron reactions Increased circulation??
    23. 23.   Sort of, but not really Circulation  By BISAC category  Converted vs. New    Year-to-Year Withdrawals East’s patrons
    24. 24.  BISAC categories with highest circulation:         COOKING BIO LEISURE HEALTH HISTORY RELIGION TESTS MATH 8% 4% 4% 3% 3% 3% 2% 1%
    25. 25.  Books (after 6 mos. & 1 yr.)  Converted ▪ No circ: 78%; 63% ▪ 1-4 circs each: 20%; 24% ▪ 5+ circs each: 5 books; 9 books  New ▪ No circ: 41%; 32% ▪ 1-4 circs each: 59%; 59% ▪ 5+ circs each: 6 books ( 2 books had 6 circs, 1 had 7 circs, 1 had 8 circs); 31 books- 6-9 times each (1 book had 13 circs; 1 book had 14 circs)
    26. 26.  CD Audiobooks and Playaways (after 6 mos.)  Converted ▪ 93% had no circ ▪ 7% had 1+ circ  New ▪ 100% had no circ
    27. 27. Circulation of East’s BISAC Books & Magazines at East Aug 2011- Aug 2012 Sept 2012 – Sept 2013 % Change # of Checkouts # of Checkouts Adult Nonfiction 1,669 1,341 -20% Juvenile Nonfiction 1,075 889 -17% Adult Magazines 846 636 -25% Juvenile Magazines 2 0 -100% YA Magazines 60 14 -77%
    28. 28. Books withdrawn (year-end totals):  2009: 3,385  2010: 5,111  2011: 3,234  2012: 2,319
    29. 29.       3,100+ patrons 49% in zip code 47713 65% adult, 8% juvenile, 2% YA 14% are 43-52 years old 11% are 23-27 or 28-32 years old 21% of them sent to Collection Agency
    30. 30. Manual Blocks *East Stringtown *West Credit Bureau: 21% Credit Bureau: 14% Credit Bureau: 12% Amount owed: $78,027.50 Amount owed: $65,553.08 Amount owed: $64,586.02 All other manual blocks: 79% All other manual blocks: 86% All other manual blocks: 88% Amount owed: $24,015.71 Amount owed: $28,060.51 Amount owed: $28,713.41 Total amount owed: $102,043.21 Total amount owed: $93,613.59 Total amount owed: $92,759.41
    31. 31. Annual Compilations of Quarterly In-house Usage Stats *East Stringtown *West 2010: 6,487 2010: 6,955 2010: 8,671 2011: 5,824 2011: 3,822 2011: 6,357 2012: 4,514 2012: 3,328 2012: 5,317 2013 (thru Sept.): 2,466 2013 (thru Sept.): 1,752 2013 (thru Sept.): 4,068
    32. 32. Maintenance issues:  Changing BISAC headings  Call numbers in taxonomy  Spine labels  Bibliographic records   No authority records Communicating changes
    33. 33.         Avoid fads Don’t re-invent the wheel Know your ILS Weed heavily Goals and timeline Committee/Team Schedule meetings Delegate!
    34. 34.        Listen! Communicate/Discuss Document decisions Credit/Praise Coordinate Dark chocolate Don’t look back!
    35. 35.         Strength in numbers Organization is crucial Pick your battles Delegate! Don’t judge a book by its cover (or its title on a spreadsheet) Ignorance IS bliss Definition of ASSUME Perfection isn’t the goal!
    36. 36.   Local history collection Other neighborhood branches?
    37. 37. “Start by doing what’s necessary; then do what’s possible; and suddenly you are doing the impossible” – St. Francis of Assisi
    38. 38. Contact information: Andrea Kappler Cataloging Manager Evansville Vanderburgh Public Library andreak@evpl.org 812-428-8398
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