Project Management and Personality Type
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Project Management and Personality Type

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Effective project management demands that products are delivered on time, on budget, and with the expected level of quality. How can you prevent personality conflicts from getting in the way?

Effective project management demands that products are delivered on time, on budget, and with the expected level of quality. How can you prevent personality conflicts from getting in the way?

Join me at the at the Management Progression at the 2012 STC Summit on Tuesday, May 22 from 10-11 a.m.

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    Project Management and Personality Type Project Management and Personality Type Presentation Transcript

    • ProjectManagementand Personality Type
    • Personality Type Myers-Briggs Type Indicator Measures personality on 4 scales
    • 1. OrientationExtraversion (E) Introversion (I)Gain energy from the Gain energy from theexternal world of internal world ofpeople, objects, and thoughts, ideas, andevents emotions
    • 2. Gathering informationSensation (S) Intuition (N)Trust facts and Trust insight and focusfocus on detail on the big picture
    • 3. Making DecisionsThinking (T) Feeling (F)Seek to objectively Seek to empatheticallyremove themselves project themselves intofrom a situation when a situation when makingmaking decisions decisions
    • 4. AttitudeJudgment (J) Perception (P)Seek closure and make Keep their options opendecisions as soon as as long as possible insufficient facts are case new facts orknown opportunities arise
    • Extraversion: Project Mgmt Style Brainstorm and present ideas off the top of their head Communicate regularly with other team members to discuss ideas and check on status Prefer verbal to written communication
    • Extraversion: Conflict Sources May spend more time communicating about tasks than working on them Risk scope creep by verbalizing impulsive ideas that sound like decisions To avoid conflict, ask, “Will this discussion move the project forward?”
    • Introversion: Project Mgmt Style Consider their ideas carefully before discussing them with the group Focus their time and energy on completing their tasks as individual contributors Prefer written to verbal communication
    • Introversion: Conflict Sources Fail to adequately communicate decisions and delays to the entire team Take action without considering the effect on the team To avoid conflict, ask, “Do I need to discuss this with anyone first?”
    • Sensation: Project Mgmt Style Think in terms of present needs and the practical benefits of the product Rely on past successes to build approaches to future projects Break projects down into an assortment of small tasks
    • Sensation: Conflict Sources View tasks at such a granular level that they overlook opportunities to combine them Fail to develop an overall vision that they can succinctly articulate to management To avoid conflict, ask “What are the implications? What patterns are emerging?”
    • Intuition: Project Mgmt Style Take a long-term view and consider how current changes will affect future iterations Innovate new and better ways of approaching the project View the project from a high level and fill in the details as the need arises
    • Intuition: Conflict Sources Underestimate needed resources because they haven’t documented all tasks involved Fail to articulate specific benefits to management and customers To avoid conflict, ask, “Does this solution address today’s practical needs?”
    • Thinking: Project Mgmt Style Focus on an objective set of criteria Consider problems before people Challenge statements made by others, looking for holes and opportunities for improvement
    • Thinking: Conflict Sources Assign tasks without considering needs of team members, leading to alienation Risk failure by developing a product that meets specs but that no one wants to buy To avoid conflict, ask “What would customers and stakeholders think about this?”
    • Feeling: Project Mgmt Style Focus on pleasing customers and stakeholders Assign tasks based on the skills and preferences of the individual Encourage a team spirit and praise individual contributions, stating disagreement indirectly
    • Feeling: Conflict Sources Maintain harmony by leaving tasks unassigned or not pointing out when deliverables are late Discourage debate that could lead to hurt feelings but also better solutions To avoid conflict, ask, “What would I do if I weren’t worried about people’s feelings?”
    • Judgment: Project Mgmt Style Measure progress based on whether tasks are completed Organize meetings according to an agenda and stick to it Avoid scope creep, which could place the deadline at risk
    • Judgment: Conflict Sources Focus more on project management than on the end product Appear inflexible to customers, stakeholders, and other team members To avoid conflict, ask, “Can I adapt the schedule to accommodate new information?”
    • Perception: Project Mgmt Style Recognize that conditions evolve, so they focus on the ultimate goal rather than a schedule Work intensely as the deadline approaches rather than steadily throughout the project Develop informal projects when gaps are identified in existing projects or product offerings
    • Perception: Conflict Sources Take action without getting buy-in, leading to questions of who agreed to what Focus more on the learning process than on completing tasks on time To avoid conflict, ask, “Will exploring this option place the deadline at risk?”
    • Examples
    • ESTJ Questions “Will this discussion move the project forward?” “What are the implications? What patterns are emerging?” “What would customers and stakeholders think about this?” “Can I adapt the schedule to accommodate new information?”
    • INFP Questions “Do I need to discuss this with anyone first?” “Does this solution address today’s practical needs?” “What would I do if I weren’t worried about people’s feelings?” “Will exploring this option place the deadline at risk?”
    • Bibliography Baron, Renee. What Type Am I? New York, NY: Penguin Group, 1998. Myers, Isabel Briggs with Peter B. Myers. Gifts Differing. Mountain View, CA: Davies-Black Publishing, 1980, 1995. Tucker, Jennifer. Introduction to Type and Project Management. Mountain View, CA: CPP Inc, 2008. Jung Typology Test at https:// www.humanmetrics.com
    • Contact InfoAndrea J. WengerPresident, STC Carolina ChapterMembership Mgr., Technical Editing SIGawengerstc@yahoo.comwww.WriteWithPersonality.com