Differentiated Instruction for Digital Natives Portfolio 2008  Andrea Feeney
Differentiated Instruction for Digital Natives
Index <ul><li>Hypothesis </li></ul><ul><li>Essential questions </li></ul><ul><li>Definitions: </li></ul><ul><li>Informatio...
Hypothesis <ul><li>Bearing in mind that according to behavioural and educational experts : </li></ul><ul><li>Current young...
Essential Questions <ul><li>Which are the best Web 2.0 tools to use with our students? </li></ul><ul><li>How can teachers ...
Information Age Information Age  is a term that has been used to refer to the present era, generally considered as beginni...
Web 2.0 <ul><li>  “ This term was coined by O’Reilly in 2004 to refer to a second Web generation based on communities of u...
  Web 2.0 <ul><li>“ This term was coined by O’Reilly in 2004 to refer to a second Web generation based on communities of u...
<ul><li>The social Web is no more than “the people’s web”, which is what the Web should have always been.  A space for the...
Comparative chart Function: produce, design, build and share information with different supports Function: spread informat...
Digital Natives <ul><li>It is the children and the young  the ones that make evident these great changes in the different ...
<ul><li>alphabetization and personal management of knowledge. The truth of the matter is that most people do not have acce...
Differentiated Instruction <ul><li>Differentiated instruction  (sometimes referred to as  differentiated learning ) is a w...
<ul><li>In its pursuit of this foundational goal, differentiated instructional methods attempt to qualitatively, as oppose...
My Blog <ul><li>http://2ndCycleDigitalCommunity.blogspot.com </li></ul>
Conclusions <ul><li>I have set up this blog in order to continue researching on this topic all along next year together wi...
Bibliography <ul><li>Tomlinson, Carol (2001). How to Differentiate Instruction in Mixed-Ability Classrooms (2 ed.). Alexan...
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Grey Template Differentiated Instruction For Digital Natives

  1. 1. Differentiated Instruction for Digital Natives Portfolio 2008 Andrea Feeney
  2. 2. Differentiated Instruction for Digital Natives
  3. 3. Index <ul><li>Hypothesis </li></ul><ul><li>Essential questions </li></ul><ul><li>Definitions: </li></ul><ul><li>Information Age </li></ul><ul><li>Web 2.0 </li></ul><ul><li>Comparative Chart </li></ul><ul><li>Web 1.0 vs. Web 2.0 </li></ul><ul><li>Digital Natives </li></ul><ul><li>Differentiated Instruction </li></ul><ul><li>My blog </li></ul><ul><li>Conclusions </li></ul><ul><li>(of a work in progress) </li></ul><ul><li>Bibliography </li></ul>
  4. 4. Hypothesis <ul><li>Bearing in mind that according to behavioural and educational experts : </li></ul><ul><li>Current young students have started their conventional alphabetization </li></ul><ul><li>process simultaneously with their digital alphabetization process. </li></ul><ul><li>They can look for and find information in a non-linear way from great </li></ul><ul><li>corpuses of knowledge, not only from texts but also from audiovisual mediums. </li></ul><ul><li>They manage digital interfaces intuitively. </li></ul><ul><li>Our students are going to live, study and work in technology-oriented societies </li></ul><ul><li>in which the main merchandise is going to be information, instead of goods </li></ul><ul><li>(as it has been since the Industrial Revolution) </li></ul><ul><li>Teachers should plan their classes taking into consideration these resources </li></ul><ul><li>which our students are already using and are part of their everyday life. </li></ul><ul><li>Learning processes can be enhanced and enriched by their use </li></ul>
  5. 5. Essential Questions <ul><li>Which are the best Web 2.0 tools to use with our students? </li></ul><ul><li>How can teachers merge into the digital culture? </li></ul><ul><li>Which differentiated performances and resources for digital natives should we include in our planning? </li></ul>
  6. 6. Information Age Information Age is a term that has been used to refer to the present era, generally considered as beginning in the 1990’s. The name alludes to the global economy’s shift in focus away from the production of physical goods - as exemplified by the industrial age- and towards the manipulation of information. The Information Age was preceded by the Space Age .
  7. 7. Web 2.0 <ul><li> “ This term was coined by O’Reilly in 2004 to refer to a second Web generation based on communities of users and a range of special services, such as social networks, blogs, wikis, which foster the collaboration and agile exchange of information among users.” </li></ul><ul><li>“ This term is usually narrowly applied to the software that enables collaborative work functions and computer-mediated communication, with social sites like MySpace and Facebook, media sites like Flicks and You Tube and commercial sites like Amazon.com and eBay. Many of these applications share characteristics like service oriented design and the ability to upload data and media. The term Web 2.0 is also used to describe this style of software. </li></ul><ul><li>The more specific term collaborative software applies to cooperative information sharing systems and is usually narrowly applied to the software that enables collaborative work functions.” </li></ul><ul><li>Many advocates of using these tools believe that they create actual communities, and have adopted the term “online communities” to describe the resulting social structures . </li></ul><ul><li>“ The famous boom of the so called Web 2.0 is linked to the development of a series of social software tools which have enabled ordinary people to communicate, cooperate and publish in a totally transparent way. [ </li></ul>
  8. 8. Web 2.0 <ul><li>“ This term was coined by O’Reilly in 2004 to refer to a second Web generation based on communities of users and a range of special services, such as social networks, blogs, wikis, which foster the collaboration and agile exchange of information among users.” </li></ul><ul><li>“ This term is usually narrowly applied to the software that enables collaborative work functions and computer-mediated communication, with social sites like MySpace and Facebook, media sites like Flicks and You Tube and commercial sites like Amazon.com and eBay. Many of these applications share characteristics like service oriented design and the ability to upload data and media. The term Web 2.0 is also used to describe this style of software. </li></ul><ul><li>The more specific term collaborative software applies to cooperative information sharing systems and is usually narrowly applied to the software that enables collaborative work functions.” </li></ul><ul><li>Many advocates of using these tools believe that they create actual communities, and have adopted the term “online communities” to describe the resulting social structures . </li></ul><ul><li>“ The famous boom of the so called Web 2.0 is linked to the development of a series of social software tools which have enabled ordinary people to communicate, cooperate and publish in a totally transparent way. </li></ul>
  9. 9. <ul><li>The social Web is no more than “the people’s web”, which is what the Web should have always been. A space for the shared generation of knowledge, for cooperative distance working and the publishing on a universal scale of all kinds of contents (text, images, sounds and videos). We are re-discovering an elementary trait of our species: people want to communicate and cooperate with other people. Today we finally have very accessible tools to do so on a planetary level. </li></ul>
  10. 10. Comparative chart Function: produce, design, build and share information with different supports Function: spread information Free software for the user Software with paid licenses Sites with a diversity of purposes, most of the times communities of interests that share practice and information Sites with a commercial purpose, mainly Design and production don’t need great information on TICs. Accessible and practical Design and production depend on those who know about computing sciences Contents and sites which are flexible and in permanent transformation Contents and sites with a tendency to be still Information in constant change Information seldom updated Broad range of contents managed by users Sites of low and high quality managed by a webmaster Decentralized information Centralized information Web 2.0 Web 1.0
  11. 11. Digital Natives <ul><li>It is the children and the young the ones that make evident these great changes in the different ways of communicating, by means of integrating languages and resources and setting a sort of naturalization of this simultaneity between the physical and the virtual world. Likewise, their skills are different than those of the adults, for their contact with technology does not spring from something strange they have to incorporate but something that takes place simultaneously with their traditional alphabetization process and they manage to maximize the uses according to their needs. Many times we are surprised when we see the young ones who in a few seconds have understood the functioning of a game, a software or the elaborate mechanisms for multiple interactions which they establish by means of combining instant messages, several readings, videos and a broad overview of a quick zapping through any site that arouses their interest. It would be useful then to reflect as regards which are the learning processes they capitalize from these mediums, how can we, digital immigrants, enrich these shared worlds with digital natives so as to empower the processes to acquire knowledge. </li></ul><ul><li>“ Technology by itself has never solved any social nor political problem, that has been and still is a demobilizing myth. It is the people who, by means of taking ownership for technology, have to transform the world, and in order to do so, need education. We are still in a very early stage as regards digital </li></ul>
  12. 12. <ul><li>alphabetization and personal management of knowledge. The truth of the matter is that most people do not have access to the technologies we are referring to, most people who do have access to them do not know how to used them and few of those who know how to use them understand how they can learn and work in a new way with them. </li></ul><ul><li>If we cannot manage that education, digital alphabetization and civic awareness make progress in a parallel way to the one of technological developments, then the new tools will be useful to better manipulate a bigger quantity of people who – besides , will be convinced that they are very modern and participative” </li></ul><ul><li>. [1] Educ.ar,”Nuevas tendencias de aprendizaje en la red WEB 2.0”, April 2008 </li></ul><ul><li>http://portal.edu.ar/debates/educaciónytic/nuevos-alfabetismos/conversando-sobre-la-web-20.php, José Luis Orihuela, April 2008 </li></ul>
  13. 13. Differentiated Instruction <ul><li>Differentiated instruction (sometimes referred to as differentiated learning ) is a way of thinking about teaching and learning . Differentiating instruction involves providing students with different avenues to acquiring content; to processing, constructing, or making sense of ideas; and to developing teaching products so that all students within a classroom can learn effectively, regardless of differences in ability. </li></ul><ul><li>Because each learner comes to school with a different set of learning needs, examples of which include differing educational, personal, and communal contexts and varying degrees of academic skill development, differentiated instruction advocates that the educator proactively plans a variety of instruction methods so as to best facilitate effective learning experiences which are suited to the various learning needs within the classroom. In its pursuit of this foundational goal, differentiated instructional methods attempt to qualitatively, as opposed to quantitatively, match learners' abilities with appropriate material; include a blend of whole-class, group, and individual instruction; use numerous approaches to facilitating input, processing, and output; and constantly adapt to learners' needs based upon the teacher's constant assessment of all students. </li></ul>
  14. 14. <ul><li>In its pursuit of this foundational goal, differentiated instructional methods attempt to qualitatively, as opposed to quantitatively, match learners' abilities with appropriate material; include a blend of whole-class, group, and individual instruction; use numerous approaches to facilitating input, processing, and output; and constantly adapt to learners' needs based upon the teacher's constant assessment of all students needs based upon the teacher's constant assessment of all students. </li></ul><ul><li>Often referred to as an educational philosophy , differentiated instruction is viewed as a proactive approach to instruction and an idea that has as many faces as practitioners. The model of differentiated instruction requires teachers to tailor their instruction and adjust the curriculum to students’ needs rather than expecting students to modify themselves to fit the curriculum. Teachers who are committed to this approach believe that who they teach shapes how they teach because who the students are shapes how they learn . </li></ul><ul><li>4. Tomlinson, Carol (2001). How to Differentiate Instruction in Mixed-Ability Classrooms (2 ed.). Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development. ISBN 0871205122 </li></ul>
  15. 15. My Blog <ul><li>http://2ndCycleDigitalCommunity.blogspot.com </li></ul>
  16. 16. Conclusions <ul><li>I have set up this blog in order to continue researching on this topic all along next year together with the other 2nd Cycle Teachers of English. </li></ul>
  17. 17. Bibliography <ul><li>Tomlinson, Carol (2001). How to Differentiate Instruction in Mixed-Ability Classrooms (2 ed.). Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development. ISBN 0871205122 </li></ul><ul><li>[1] Educ.ar,”Nuevas tendencias de aprendizaje en la red WEB 2.0”, April 2008 </li></ul><ul><li>http://portal.edu.ar/debates/educaciónytic/nuevos-alfabetismos/conversando-sobre-la-web-20.php </li></ul><ul><li>Educ.ar,”Nuevas tendencias de aprendizaje en la red WEB 2.0”, April 2008 </li></ul><ul><li>http://portal.edu.ar/debates/educaciónytic/nuevos-alfabetismos/conversando-sobre-la-web-20.php, José Luis Orihuela, April 2008 </li></ul>

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