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Sources Of Sexuality Related Information Among College Students

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  • Internet, peer, media top 3 for both males and females
  • Transcript

    • 1. Sources of Sexuality-Related Information Among College Students Andrea L. DeMaria, MS Ariane V. Hollub, PhD, CHES, OTR Texas A&M University 17 th Texas HIV/STD Conference
    • 2. Background
      • The incidence of sexually transmitted infections (STI) and the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) remains problematic across U.S. 1-3
      • It has been estimated that 19 million new STI cases are diagnosed each year in the U.S. 2
      • Parents, peers, and the media have been found to be the preferred and most influential sources of sexual information for adolescents and college students. 4-6
    • 3. Background
      • Recent research indicates college students are obtaining the majority of their sexuality-related information from the Internet. 7-8
      • Sexuality-related information topics that have been found to be frequently searched by adolescents and college students include: sexual health, STIs, sexual behaviors, contraceptives, abortion, and sexual identity. 7-9
    • 4. Purpose
      • The purpose of this study was to:
        • Identify sexuality-related information sources used by college students,
        • Determine the sexuality-related information topics college students have sought or obtained information about, and
        • Gain insight into college students’ perceived reliability of sexuality-related information sources.
    • 5. Methods
      • Participant recruitment
        • Undergraduate students from Texas A&M University
        • Classroom and email recruitment from health-related undergraduate courses
      • Data collection
        • Online survey instrument
        • 455 completed surveys collected in November 2009
          • Response rate unknown
    • 6. Measures
      • Participant characteristics
        • Includes participant’s age, year in school, college major, sexual orientation, race/ethnicity, and relationship status
      • Sexuality-related information
        • Includes sources of sexuality-related information
        • Sexuality-related topics that students seek or obtain information about
        • Perceived reliability of sexuality-related information sources
    • 7.  
    • 8.  
    • 9.  
    • 10.  
    • 11. Other Measures
      • Sexual history
      • Sexual behaviors
      • Multi-Factor Attitude toward Condoms Scale (MFACS)
    • 12. Participant Characteristics Age (N = 455) Mean SD Age (years) 20.31 ±1.44 Race/ethnicity (N = 455) n % White 345 75.8 Hispanic or Latino 71 15.6 Asian or Asian-American 20 4.4 Black or African-American 11 2.4 Other 8 1.7
    • 13. Participant Characteristics
    • 14. Sexuality-Related Information Topics Other topics: Masturbation, Sex toys, Men’s sexual health, Sexual harassment, Sexual orientation, Anal intercourse, Puberty issues, Sexual dysfunction, Sexual violence, Gender identity Sexual topics (N = 455) n % Contraceptives 288 63.3 Pregnancy 258 56.7 Women’s sexual health 235 51.6 Sexual positions 218 47.9 STIs 212 46.6 Sexual health 199 43.7 Abstinence 198 43.5 Vaginal intercourse 165 36.3 Oral sex 149 32.7 HIV/AIDS 140 30.8
    • 15. Sexuality-Related Information Topics by Gender Female Sexual topics (N = 322) n Contraceptives 227 Women’s sexual health 208 Pregnancy 205 Sexual positions 158 STIs 156 Sexual health 154 Abstinence 146 Vaginal intercourse 118 Oral sex 106 HIV/AIDS 97 Male Sexual topics (N = 133) n Contraceptives 61 Men’s sexual health 60 Sexual positions 60 STIs 56 Pregnancy 53 Abstinence 52 Vaginal intercourse 47 Sexual health 45 Oral sex 43 HIV/AIDS 43
    • 16. Sexuality-Related Information Sources
    • 17. Sexuality-Related Information Sources Sexuality-related information source (N = 455) N % Internet 388 85.3 Search engine 358 90.2 WebMD 245 61.7 Wikipedia 187 47.1 Peer or friend 373 82.0 Female friend 347 90.1 Friend of same age 342 88.8 Friend of older age 309 80.3 Male friend 296 76.9 Significant other 294 76.4 Media 350 76.9 Magazine 332 89.7 Television 258 69.7 Movie 235 63.5
    • 18. Sexuality-Related Information Sources School 303 66.6 Health course 282 91.0 Textbooks 276 89.0 Teacher 190 61.3 Medical professional 278 61.1 Doctor 256 89.5 Nurse 166 58.0 Immediate family 263 57.8 Mother 225 83.0 Father 88 32.5 Sister 86 31.7 Brother 44 16.2 College campus 167 36.7 Flier 122 63.2 Campus health educator 110 57.0 Student health center 99 51.3
    • 19. Sexuality-Related Information Sources Religious 165 36.3 Religious text 143 83.1 Youth group leader 136 79.1 Devotional materials 116 67.9 Member of religious organization 115 66.9 Community health facility 69 15.2 Planned Parenthood 58 80.6 County Health Department 10 13.9 Hope Pregnancy Center 7 9.7
    • 20. Perceived Reliability of Sexuality-Related Information Sources
    • 21. Perceived Reliability of Sexuality-Related Information Sources
    • 22. Implications
      • Understanding where college students obtain sexuality-related information is important.
      • Knowing which sexuality-related topics college students are seeking information about can aid health professionals.
      • Further insight into intervention development related to the sexual health of college students.
      • Open lines of sexual health communication within the college population.
    • 23. Implications
      • Provides suggested outlets for information
        • Internet
        • Search engines
          • Reliability of source?
      • Intervention development same for males and females
      • Importance of HIV/AIDS
        • HIV/AIDS vs STI knowledge and infromation
    • 24. Limitations
      • The current research is limited to its use among a college population.
      • There may have been possible response bias due to the sensitive nature of topics covered in the survey.
      • The utilization of an open online link for survey access lead the researchers to have a lack of control over who accessed and completed the survey.
    • 25. References
      • 1. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. What the CDC is doing. Available from: http://www.cdc.gov/hiv/hispanics/cdc.htm . Accessed September 6, 2008
      • 2. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Trends in reportable sexually transmitted diseases in the United States, 2006. Available from: http://www.cdc.gov/std/stats/pdf/trends2006.pdf . Accessed September 20, 2008.
      • 3. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Sexually transmitted disease surveillance 2006. Available from: http://www.cdc.gov/std/stats/pdf/introductory-sections.pdf . Accessed September 6, 2008.
      • 4. Somers, C.L. & Surman, A.T. (2004). Adolescents' preferences for source of sex education. Child Study Journal, 24, 47-59.
      • 5. Ballard, S.M. & Morris, M.L. (1998). Sources of sexuality information for university students. Journal of Sex Education and Therapy, 23, 278-287.
      • 6. Feigenbaum, R., Weinstein, E. & Rosen, E. (1995). College students’ sexual attitudes and behaviors: Implications for sexuality education. Journal of American College Health, 44, 112-118.
      • 7. Escoffery, C., Miner, K.R., Adame, D.D., Butler, S., McCormick, L. & Mendell, E. (2005). Internet use for health information among college students. Journal of American College Health, 53, 183-188.
      • 8. Borzekowski, D.L. & Rickert, V.I. (2001). Adolescent cybersurfing for health information. Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, 155, 813-817.
      • 9. Epstein, M. & Ward, L.M. (2007). "Always use protection": Communication boys receive about sex from parents, peers, and the media. Journal of Youth and Adolescence, 37, 113-126