New Hampshire
                          School Library Media Association
                          State of New Hampshire’...
You can see that information literacy is taught heavily in elementary school, but is less structured
in the middle schools...
Open positions may be due to budget cuts and less sources of revenue for school districts.
Recently NHSLMA has been approa...
Note the trend of paraprofessionals providing library services. A paraprofessional is by
definition not a library media sp...
Internet and computer access is good, though bandwidth and infrastructure issues continue to be
reported through the list-...
This report shows the average copyright year for non-fiction books. Aged books in a collection
can be partially attributed...
Budgets for e-books were minimal at the time of this data collection, as librarians and teachers
are still working out how...
Works Cited

New Hampshire Department of Education, New Hampshire School Library Media Association.
New Hampshire Public S...
3. Using information accurately and creatively;
                     4. Pursuing information related to personal interests...
(3) In each elementary school, the services of a reading specialist and library media
             specialist to facilitat...
d. Implement effective strategies and techniques to systematically perform
                library management operations, ...
1. The Internet; and
                     2. Electronic databases;
          (4) In the area of teaching and learning, the...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

State Of New Hampshire School Libraries Report

2,073 views

Published on

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
2,073
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
4
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
20
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

State Of New Hampshire School Libraries Report

  1. 1. New Hampshire School Library Media Association State of New Hampshire’s School Libraries In 2009, I sent out a survey to our school libraries through our list-serv asking librarians about budget and staffing changes. The collected data needs to be taken three years in a row in order to show a trend, but the first report was not pleasant. Please note that in our state the certification for a school librarian is “library media specialist”. Fortunately our State Office of Educational Technology headed by Dr. Cathy Higgins has also been collecting and disseminating data on the state of our school libraries. Her data is in a report available online and the graphics are included below, along with some narratives regarding the State of New Hampshire’s School Libraries. Andrea Ange   Advocacy and Government Relations Liaison, New Hampshire School Library Media Association 
  2. 2. You can see that information literacy is taught heavily in elementary school, but is less structured in the middle schools and high schools. Individual school districts have developed k-12 curricula based on AASL and ISTE standards, but there is not currently a statewide curriculum for media literacy. It should also be noted that we do have several schools operating in New Hampshire without the benefit of a library media specialist. “According to our employment records in Credentialing there are 187 schools (elementary, middle or high school) out of 480 or so that do not have someone employed as a Library Media Specialist or a Library Media Supervisor.” – Board of Credentials. A further breakdown shows that Number of credentials by level: Elementary – 149 Middle – 22 High School – 15.” Numbers are from the Bureau of Credentialing, January 2009. Yet the standards for school personnel clearly call for each school to have the services of a library media specialist, see Standard (Ed 306.15) in the additional supporting materials at the end of this report. Andrea Ange   Advocacy and Government Relations Liaison, New Hampshire School Library Media Association 
  3. 3. Open positions may be due to budget cuts and less sources of revenue for school districts. Recently NHSLMA has been approached by our state library about “certification courses” for paraprofessionals that are taking care of libraries without proper training. Our organization would like to make sure that all students are getting the resources they need for a good education but we are concerned that some schools are choosing to use paraprofessionals instead of hiring qualified librarians. For NHSLMA, training these paraprofessionals puts our members between the proverbial “rock and a hard place.” High schools report the heaviest use by non-instructional users, which follows the trend of more flexible scheduling for librarians in the high school setting. Flexible scheduling seems to work best at upper levels, though elementary librarians report difficulty finding enough time for cataloging, collection development, inventory management and collaboration with teaching staff. In addition there seems to be a trend to staff elementary libraries with support staff and having one librarian handle the teaching needs for multiple schools in a district. We have worked hard in our state to get our schools to see the value of teaching media literacy, developing curriculum and integrating state standards into our coursework. The concept of a school librarian being a teacher is not new in New Hampshire, but there is little mention of libraries or librarianship in our teacher education programs. Our organization is working on changing this through our connections with the teacher and administrator education programs in New Hampshire’s colleges. Andrea Ange   Advocacy and Government Relations Liaison, New Hampshire School Library Media Association 
  4. 4. Note the trend of paraprofessionals providing library services. A paraprofessional is by definition not a library media specialist. Administrative rules set out by the department of education describe the Library Media Specialist (Ed 507.21) state that schools must provide the services of a Certified Library Media Specialist (Ed 306.15) and must provide instructional resources that are cataloged using AARC2 rules (Ed 306.08). See additional supporting materials at the end of this report. Andrea Ange   Advocacy and Government Relations Liaison, New Hampshire School Library Media Association 
  5. 5. Internet and computer access is good, though bandwidth and infrastructure issues continue to be reported through the list-serv and the Tech Leader Cohort program. Many school technology leaders and librarians report restricted access to the internet due to filtering and restrictive policies regarding social networking, instant messaging, mp3 players and chat. Technology education regarding social responsibility (safety, cyber bullying and protocol) is on the rise, but policy is not keeping up with technology tools. Andrea Ange   Advocacy and Government Relations Liaison, New Hampshire School Library Media Association 
  6. 6. This report shows the average copyright year for non-fiction books. Aged books in a collection can be partially attributed to several factors, lack of sufficient budget for materials, paraprofessionals being put in charge of libraries not realizing the need for updated information and over-extended librarians not having the time for proper collection maintenance. Andrea Ange   Advocacy and Government Relations Liaison, New Hampshire School Library Media Association 
  7. 7. Budgets for e-books were minimal at the time of this data collection, as librarians and teachers are still working out how best to use these resources. Elementary and middle schools in New Hampshire get a lot of their collection development funds through book fairs. Funding for high school libraries is dependent on the community, grant writing and donations. Andrea Ange   Advocacy and Government Relations Liaison, New Hampshire School Library Media Association 
  8. 8. Works Cited New Hampshire Department of Education, New Hampshire School Library Media Association. New Hampshire Public School Library Survey 2007 Statewide Report in Brief. Concord, NH, 4 April 2010 . New Hampshire School Library Media Association. List-serv. Concord, 06 April 2010. Online Professional Education Network. Tech Leader Cohort Online: Session Dates: 2/1/09 to 3/1/10. 4 April 2010 <http://opennh.net/course/view.php?id=101>. State of New Hampshire, Bureau of Credentialing. New Hampshire School Library Data. Concord, NH, 06 April 2010. State of New Hampshire, General Court. CHAPTER Ed 300 ADMINISTRATION OF MINIMUM STANDARDS IN PUBLIC SCHOOLS. 1 July 2005. 06 April 2010 <http://www.gencourt.state.nh.us/rules/state_agencies/ed300.html>. —. CHAPTER Ed 500 CERTIFICATION STANDARDS FOR EDUCATIONAL PERSONNEL. 24 July 2003. 4 April 2010 <http://www.gencourt.state.nh.us/rules/state_agencies/ed500.html>. Additional Supporting Materials Ed 306.08 Instructional Resources. (a) The local school board shall require that each school: (1) Provides a developmentally appropriate collection of instructional resources, including online and print materials, equipment, and instructional technologies, that shall be current, comprehensive, and necessary to support the curriculum as well as the instructional needs of the total school population; (2) Provides that instructional resources are, as appropriate: a. Catalogued and classified according to practices accepted by the American Library Association as specified in the Anglo-American Cataloguing Rules, Second Edition (AACR2), 2002 edition; b. Organized to make them accessible to students and staff; c. Managed through circulation policies and procedures that are designed to maximize the use of the resources; and d. Utilize community resources; (3) Provides instructional resources to all students and staff from designated space(s) in each school, including: a. Ready access to instructional resources, including those available online or through interlibrary loan; b. Instruction in: 1. Accessing information efficiently and effectively; 2. Evaluating information critically and competently; Andrea Ange   Advocacy and Government Relations Liaison, New Hampshire School Library Media Association 
  9. 9. 3. Using information accurately and creatively; 4. Pursuing information related to personal interests; 5. Appreciating literature and other creative expressions of information; 6. Striving for excellence in information-seeking and knowledge generation; 7. Recognizing the importance of information to a democratic society; 8. Practicing ethical behavior in regard to information and information technology; and 9. Participating effectively in groups to pursue and generate information; and c. Activities to promote the development of reading, viewing, and listening skills; and (4) Implements a written plan for the ongoing development, organization, acquisition, maintenance, replacement, and updating of instructional resources necessary to support the needs of the user population and the curriculum. (b) At a minimum, the plan implemented under (a)(4) above shall: (1) Provide an analysis and assessment of the present instructional resources based on: a. The needs of the user population and the curriculum; b. Accessibility of instructional resources to all students and staff; c. Strengths and weaknesses of the present instructional resources; and d. Resources available within the district, the local community, and beyond; (2) Reflect developing instructional technologies; and (3) Establish priorities, criteria, timelines, and procedures for the selection, acquisition, maintenance, and replacement of instructional resources which shall include but not be limited to: a. Online materials, b. Print materials, c. Equipment, and d. Instructional technologies. Source. #2055, eff 6-16-82; ss by #2714, eff 5-16-84; ss by #2787, eff 7-31-84; ss by #4851, eff 6-25-90; ss by #5546, eff 7-1-93; ss by #6366, eff 10-30-96, EXPIRED: 10-30-04 New. #8206, INTERIM, eff 11-18-04, EXPIRED: 5-17-05 New. #8354, eff 7-1-05 Ed 306.15 Provision of Staff and Staff Qualifications. (a) To carry out the educational program established by these rules and local school board policy, the local school board shall require that each school provides: (1) The services of a certified principal, a certified library media specialist and a certified guidance counselor(s); (2) For the hiring and training of teachers certified under Ed 500; Andrea Ange   Advocacy and Government Relations Liaison, New Hampshire School Library Media Association 
  10. 10. (3) In each elementary school, the services of a reading specialist and library media specialist to facilitate the delivery of the language arts and reading program established in Ed 306.37(a); (4) In each middle and high school, a library media specialist to support the instructional resources program and facility requirements of Ed 306.08; and (5) Teachers, including art, music, health, and physical education teachers, in accordance with class size requirements in Ed 306.17. (b) The local school board shall require that in carrying out the guidance plan established by Ed 306.13: (1) The counseling load in each elementary school shall not exceed the equivalent of one full-time guidance counselor per 500 students served; and (2) The counseling load in each middle school and each high school shall not exceed the equivalent of one full time guidance counselor per 300 students served. (c) The local school board shall require that each school with an enrollment of 500 or more students provides the services of an associate principal or 2 or more persons with administrative certification under Ed 506 who together act as a full-time equivalent to carry out administrative duties assigned by the superintendent in accordance with local school board policy. (d) The local school board may provide for each school the services of additional staff to facilitate the use of the instructional resources described in Ed 306.08 and the technological resources needed to facilitate the information and communication technologies program described in Ed 306.42. (e) Pursuant to RSA 189:24 and in accordance with Ed 500 and Ed 600, the local school board shall require that each professional staff member is certified for assignment by the department. (f) In accordance with Ed 509, the local school board shall require that each professional staff member shall improve the content knowledge and teaching skills through participation in a local professional development plan. Source. #5546, eff 7-1-93; ss by #6366, eff 10-30-96, EXPIRED: 10-30-04 New. #8206, INTERIM, eff 11-18-04, EXPIRED: 5-17-05 New. #8354, eff 7-1-05 Ed 507.21 Library Media Specialist. The following requirements shall apply to the certification of a library media specialist in grades K-12: (a) To be certified as a library media specialist, the candidate shall have a bachelor’s degree. (b) A candidate for certification as a library media specialist shall have the following skills, competencies, and knowledge through a combination of academic and supervised practical experiences in the following areas: (1) In the area of administration, the ability to: a. Collaborate with other educators to create a mission statement and develop long-range program goals; b. Develop and implement policies and procedures to acquire, process, organize, disseminate, maintain and continually assess collections of information resources, essential equipment, and latest technologies; c. Train, supervise, and evaluate support staff, volunteers, and student helpers; Andrea Ange   Advocacy and Government Relations Liaison, New Hampshire School Library Media Association 
  11. 11. d. Implement effective strategies and techniques to systematically perform library management operations, including, but not limited to: 1. Budgeting; 2. Staffing; 3. Scheduling; and 4. Managing and maintaining resources; e. Assess the strengths and weaknesses of the library media program; f. Set program goals for a library media program consistent with school-wide objectives; g. Design, manage, and maintain the library media facility to support the collaborative and independent work of all learners; h. Participate in local, state, and national education and technology initiatives, to ensure integration of current research findings and best practices into the library media program; i. Promote the library media center as an essential link to the larger learning community; j. Align the library media program with national library information literacy standards; k. Provide staff development opportunities to acquaint teachers with the use of new resources; and l. Offer strategies for the inclusion of new resources into curriculum planning and classroom instruction; (2) In the area of ethical, legal, and responsible use of information, the ability to: a. Develop policies consistent with: 1. School, district, state, and national standards; 2. Relevant laws and legislation; 3. Privacy rights; 4. Equity of access; and 5. Tenets of intellectual freedom; b. Design and implement student learning activities which address ethical issues in the use of information; c. Model and promote compliance with copyright laws and fair use guidelines; and d. Model and promote the highest standard of ethics and integrity in the use of information resources; (3) In the area of collection development, the ability to: a. Create and implement a collection development policy that demonstrates knowledge of principles related to selection, acquisition, organization, evaluation, and reconsideration of library resources; b. Select current, relevant, and balanced resources for the diverse needs of the school community that support the curriculum and provide leisure reading materials; c. Implement standard procedures for classifying, cataloging, and processing that facilitate resource sharing; and d. Employ existing and emerging technologies to access, evaluate, and disseminate information including, but not limited to: Andrea Ange   Advocacy and Government Relations Liaison, New Hampshire School Library Media Association 
  12. 12. 1. The Internet; and 2. Electronic databases; (4) In the area of teaching and learning, the ability to: a. Promote literacy and the use and integration of information systems to enrich the curriculum and enhance learning; b. Design effective instruction by applying knowledge of: 1. Literature; 2. Information; and 3. The learner; c. Model and teach information problem-solving; d. Collaborate with educators to plan, implement, and assess units of study that integrate multimedia, research, and information literacy into classroom instruction; e. Assist learners in choosing, evaluating, and utilizing the most appropriate information resource to enhance: 1. Decision-making; 2. Problem-solving; 3. Research; 4. Communication; and 5. Productivity; f. Create an environment that fosters and supports individual and collaborative inquiry, appropriately employing group management strategies; g. Demonstrate a working understanding of the design, production, and use of educational technology tools; and h. Collaborate with teachers and principals to assess student learning of content and information literacy goals; and (5) In the area of literature, the ability to: a. Encourage and engage students in reading, viewing, and listening for understanding and enjoyment; b. Use knowledge of literature to guide and encourage students to read a variety of fiction and non-fiction resources for personal and informational needs; c. Introduce students to a range of genres in both print and digital formats by creating events, activities, and displays that encourage reading; d. Promote quality literature and authors reflecting a variety of cultures and themes; e. Model the appreciation and enjoyment of literature; and f. Collaborate with teachers to expand the effective uses of literature in the curriculum. Source. #6349, eff 10-5-96; ss by #7925, eff 7-24-03 Andrea Ange   Advocacy and Government Relations Liaison, New Hampshire School Library Media Association 

×