Storm rubrics presentation
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

Storm rubrics presentation

on

  • 769 views

 

Statistics

Views

Total Views
769
Views on SlideShare
769
Embed Views
0

Actions

Likes
1
Downloads
5
Comments
0

0 Embeds 0

No embeds

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

Storm rubrics presentation Storm rubrics presentation Presentation Transcript

  • Riana Almolsch Katherine Buhrer Paulette Eloy-Bell Angel Patillo
  • • A rubric is a scoring tool that explicitly represents the performance expectations for an assignment or piece of work. • Typically features a stated objective, uses some sort of range to rate performance, and contains specific performance criteria which indicate the degree to which the standard has been met. • Rubrics typically create a range of performance from 1-4 with 1 being the lowest score and 4 being the highest score. • Often created by a teacher to guide student performance on a project, essay, paper, etc. • It also provides opportunities for peer evaluation, self review, & reflection.
  • • You are writing the same comments for multiple students. • You are spending a lot of time making comments, especially corrective comments. • You get questions from your students about assignment requirements, even after you’ve. • Handed back the marked assignments. • You have students asking for more detailed justifications of the marks they received. • You have teaching assistants marking assignments. • You require students to submit a first draft of an assignment and you want to give
  • #1: Reflect on what you want your students to do, why you created the assignment, what happened the last time you assigned it, and what expectations you have #2: List the details of the assignment, identify the learning objectives you hope to fulfill, and determine the highest expectations you have for your students’ achievement #3: Establish your criteria based upon the highest levels of achievement you can expect #4: Apply a description of each level of achievement you see possible to a rubric grid based upon criteria, performance, and a clear scoring system
  • Create/Import and Grade
  • • Select your Blackboard course • Under “Control Panel,” click “Course Tools,” click “Rubrics,” then click “Create Rubric” • Name your rubric and give a brief description • Select your “Rubric Type” • Add columns and rows as necessary according to criteria and level of achievement • Use drop-down arrows next to fields names to edit the field title or the delete the column/row • Click “Levels of Achievement” and “Criteria” to choose your order of organization • Assign values in scoring fields • Complete content fields with a description of each level of achievement (Note: you can prepare a Microsoft table or spreadsheet to copy/paste to Blackboard) • Once you click “Submit,” you will see your new rubric listed under the “Rubrics” link • To edit a rubric, use the drop-down arrow next to the rubric title and click “Edit”
  • • Go to a content area in Blackboard, and under the field “Create an Assessment” click “Create an Assignment” • Name and describe the assignment, attaching any necessary files • Under the “Grading” section of this page, bring your cursor to the “Associated Rubrics” • You will have the option to “Select Rubric,” “Create New Rubric,” or “Create From Existing” • To use a rubric you have already created, click “Select Rubric” • Choose rubric you wish to use and click “Submit” • Click “OK” to assign the rubric’s “Maximum Points” as the “Points Possible” • Once a rubric is associated with an assignment, you can change, view, and show rubrics to students • Students can click “View Rubric” in the link for the assignment before they begin
  • • Go to the “Grade Center” under the “Control Panel” and click either “Needs Grading” or “Full Grade Center” • If you click “Needs Grading,” click “Grade All” • If you click “Full Grade Center,” bring your cursor over boxes with green exclamation points, and use the drop-down arrow to select “View Grade Details” and click “Grade Attempt” • Under the “Assignment Details” click “View Rubric” beside the empty “Attempt” grade field • When the rubric appears, you may select the levels of achievement for each criterion by clicking the corresponding box on the grid • You will be given an option to leave “Feedback” in a textbox • Once you have selected a score for each criterion, the rubric will calculate a “Raw Score,” but you have the option to enter a number higher or lower in the actual grade field • Click “Save” to save the grade, and click “Save and Next” to submit the grade for that student and begin grading the next assignment
  • Improve student performance by making expectations clear: • Help define “quality” • Help students identify problems within their own and other student’s work • Provide concrete informative feedback to students
  • Reduced time spent evaluating students: • Provides clearly defined assessment criteria based on a benchmark for success • Keeps grading objective, levels of achievement are the same for everyone • Allows the instructor to focus on key areas of importance, grading time is reduced
  • Rubrics assess the finished product: • Some students may focus on the end product, not the learning process • Students with learning disabilities may need to have a different rubric which includes effort, progress and alternative tasks • In fields such as music or art, it may be difficult to use rubrics that assess creativity and inspiration
  • • Find rubrics online that are similar to your needs and try to adapt them to your purposes • Keep the number of dimensions manageable: • Limit the rubric to one page • Limit the number of dimensions to the 5-8 most important criteria for assessment (Limit the nit- picking!) • Make language clear and similar between columns • Try to limit the use of negative words such as none, never and seldom in the lower levels of achievement • Assign points to categories and make the assignment worth that number of points rather than translating the rubric values into a score
  • • Make the rubric available to students in advance so they clearly understand expectations. • Use terms to evaluate that are descriptive and specific
  • 1. Stevens, D. D. & Levi, Antonia J. (2005). Introduction to rubrics: An assessment tool to save grading time, convey effective feedback, and promote student learning. Sterling, VA: Stylus. Retrieved from: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=StxOKUgThhQ and https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yhmxz8V3V8k 2. Middleweb. (2013). Rubrics. Retrieved from: http://www.middleweb.com/CSLB2rubric.html 3. Handrade, H. (2013). Understanding rubrics. Retrieved from: http://learnweb.harvard.edu/alps/thinking/docs/rubricar.htm 4. Teach-nology. (1999-2010). Rubrics. Retrieved from: http://www.teach- nology.com/web_tools/rubrics/rubricprocon.htm 5. Suthor, M. (2008. Teaching tip: creating and using rubrics. Retrieved from: http://www.helium.com/items/1158203-creating-and-using-rubrics 6. FITB. (2013). Rubrics. Retrieved from: http://www.eutopia.org/blog/designing-usingrubrics- andrew-miller 7. Meador, D. (2013). Rubrics. Retrieved from: http://teaching.about.com/od/J- Rteachingvocabulary/g/Rubric.htm 8. Carnergie Mellon. (2013). Grading and performance in rubrics. Retrieved from: http://www.cmu.edu/teaching/designteach/teach/rubrics.html 9. Simkis, M. (2013). Designing great rubrics. Retrieved from: http://sblc.registereastconn.org/greatrubrics.pdf 10. Mullinix, B. (2004). Rubrics. Retrieved from: http://www.tltgroup.org/resources/Rubrics.htm