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Chapter 2: Foundations of Verbal Language
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Chapter 2: Foundations of Verbal Language

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Presentation created for COMM 107 - Oral Communication: Principles and Practice …

Presentation created for COMM 107 - Oral Communication: Principles and Practice

University of Maryland

Source: Communication: A Social and Career Focus by Berko, Wolvin & Wolvin

Published in: Education

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Transcript

  • 1. Foundation of Verbal Knowledge
  • 2.
    • The name of the grossest insect, bug, or animal you can thing of.
    • The name of your least favorite food.
    • Your mom’s name.
  • 3.
    • What’s your favorite word? Why? What does it bring to mind?
  • 4.
    • Does language create meaning?
    • Does meaning create language?
  • 5.
    • Language is always evolving
    30 seconds
  • 6.
    • How do we process language?
      • Cybernetic process and selective communication
  • 7.  
  • 8.
    • How do we learn language?
      • Language explosion theory
        • Parents 
        • Childhood 
        • School 
        • Peers 
        • Friends 
        • BOOM!
  • 9.
    • How do we learn language?
      • Significant-other theory
        • Individuals have no identity except in relation to others
  • 10.
    • The language and words we learn have the meaning we assign to them
      • We derive meaning through our backgrounds, experiences, perceptions. Thus, people interpret information differently
  • 11.
    • What affects our understanding of meaning?
      • Frame of reference
      • Denotative and connotative meaning
    16:56
  • 12.
    • Emotive language
    • Phatic language
    • Rhetorical language
    • Identifying language
  • 13.
    • Ambiguity
      • Double meaning
    • Vagueness
      • Unclear
      • Doublespeak
    • Inferences
      • Assumptions
  • 14.
    • Slang
    • Inarticulates
    • Non-Standard English dialects
        • High-prestige vs. Low-prestige dialects
      • Ebonics
      • Spanglish
      • Asian-American English
      • Native American Languages
  • 15.
    • “ There are many dialects and some get a lot of respect and some don’t get any. In some cases, the respect given to the dialect is the same amount that is given to the people who speak it.”
    • Pg. 51
  • 16.
    • Cool… What does that even mean?
  • 17.
    • Group topics due today on the blog
      • One, 100-word post
      • Title = your topic
    • If you are not an author on the blog yet, come see me
    • If you still need a picture on the blog, get on that
    • Subscribe to receive future blog posts via email